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NEWS
November 5, 1990
With the death yesterday of Harry Weinberg, Baltimore's only billionaire, this region is suddenly principal beneficiary of a foundation reputed to be the world's twelfth largest -- a foundation whose sole mission will be to help poor people. This is the fitting legacy of an American who made it the hard way and never forgot whence he came.The impact on Maryland will be enormous. In size the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation will be in the $900 million to $1 billion range, eight times greater than the city's current leader, the Abell Foundation.
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NEWS
December 22, 2010
As a community foundation that pursues its goals through grant-making, initiatives and advocacy, the Baltimore Community Foundation applauds Aaron Dorman's call for philanthropies to engage in advocacy ( "Smarter grant-making," Dec. 21), but we recognize as well the even more pressing imperative of loyalty to donor intent. At the Baltimore Community Foundation advocacy is important, but donor intent is sacred. Mr. Dorman holds up the Annie E. Casey Foundation as a paragon while suggesting that the Weinberg Foundation is lagging in its civic duty by not engaging in advocacy.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 9, 1991
Harry Weinberg would not let the civic establishment decide how to spend his money in his lifetime, and he's not going to change now.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 26, 2006
Nathan Weinberg, a retired trustee and vice president of a large charitable foundation, and a former transit executive, died of pneumonia yesterday at Sinai Hospital. He was 89 and lived in Pikesville. The son of immigrants from the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, Mr. Weinberg was born in Baltimore. One of seven children, he grew up in a home without indoor plumbing, according to his eldest son, Donn A. Weinberg of Owings Mills. "It is the typical immigrant story," said Donn Weinberg, who replaced his father as vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation upon his father's retirement in 2002.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
When his wife, Jeanette, died last winter, reclusive real estate mogul and billionaire Harry Weinberg made sure that she would have her privacy, even in death.Weinberg bought 72 plots in an open section of Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, near Conkling Street in East Baltimore, and saw to it that Mrs. Weinberg was buried at the center.Tomorrow, Harry Weinberg will be laid to rest beside his wife in private services scheduled to begin at 11 a.m.His outsized purchase of cemetery real estate for himself and his wife is perhaps symbolic of Weinberg's lifetime spent building both a billion-dollar fortune in real estate and a broad moat of privacy for himself and his family.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 26, 2006
Nathan Weinberg, a retired trustee and vice president of a large charitable foundation, and a former transit executive, died of pneumonia yesterday at Sinai Hospital. He was 89 and lived in Pikesville. The son of immigrants from the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, Mr. Weinberg was born in Baltimore. One of seven children, he grew up in a home without indoor plumbing, according to his eldest son, Donn A. Weinberg of Owings Mills. "It is the typical immigrant story," said Donn Weinberg, who replaced his father as vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation upon his father's retirement in 2002.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | December 17, 1991
In an article Dec. 17 on the Weinberg Foundation trustees discussing the group's charitable giving, The Evening Sun reported that the trustees broke a "yearlong silence" in an interview. Actually, the Baltimore Jewish Times interviewed the trustees earlier and published an article on the foundation's workings Dec. 6. The Evening Sun regrets the error.Trustees of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation used a ground-breaking at St. Agnes Hospital to break a year-long silence yesterday, talking publicly about the mission and methods of the huge but reclusive charitable trust.
NEWS
March 14, 1991
Four months after the death of billionaire philanthropist Harry Weinberg, four Baltimore institutions are slated to receive the initial benefits of his magnificent bequest. All are pilot projects for the Weinberg Foundation, the largest in the nation dedicated strictly to help poor people, as the trustees gather experience for later undertakings here and in the rest of the country.A $944,000 grant to the Bais Yaakov School for Girls, a project approved by Mr. Weinberg before his passing, will wipe out that Jewish institution's existing mortgage.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | November 26, 1990
A photo caption in yesterday's MBW incorrectly identified the old Trailways bus station as the Greyhound station.The Sun regrets the errors.December may be approaching, but the feeling around Baltimore's traditional retail district isn't the spirit of Christmas past or Christmas present. It's the spirit of Harry Weinberg.You can see it in the old Stewart's department store, a former hub of shopping activity that now sits largely vacant at the corner of Howard and Lexington streets. And in the handsome but empty loft buildings on two corners of Howard and Saratoga streets.
NEWS
December 22, 2010
As a community foundation that pursues its goals through grant-making, initiatives and advocacy, the Baltimore Community Foundation applauds Aaron Dorman's call for philanthropies to engage in advocacy ( "Smarter grant-making," Dec. 21), but we recognize as well the even more pressing imperative of loyalty to donor intent. At the Baltimore Community Foundation advocacy is important, but donor intent is sacred. Mr. Dorman holds up the Annie E. Casey Foundation as a paragon while suggesting that the Weinberg Foundation is lagging in its civic duty by not engaging in advocacy.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
Baltimore is becoming the town that Harry and Jeanette Weinberg built -- or, at least, a town covered with their names. Mercy Medical Center boasts a new Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center to house its women's health and medicine program. In Waverly, a Harry and Jeanette Weinberg YMCA is to open next year. The Living Classrooms Foundation, which operates from a Weinberg center, is getting a new Weinberg pavilion. Buildings at almost all major medical institutions in the city and Baltimore County bear the Weinberg name, from a cancer center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, to a planned behavioral health center at Kennedy Krieger Institute, to the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Cancer Institute at Franklin Square Hospital Center.
NEWS
October 21, 2001
ALIVE OR DEAD, Harry Weinberg has been a force to contend with. When William Donald Schaefer was mayor in the 1970s and 1980s, he stood in awe of the crafty and cranky speculator who accumulated land and buildings in the old Howard Street department store district and then kept redevelopment at bay by sitting on the holdings. After the self-made financier died in 1990, leaving his fortune to the poor, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke did his best to accommodate the $1 billion Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Johns Hopkins Hospital/Harry and Jeanette Weinberg FoundationSun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | July 28, 1995
An article in Friday's editions of The Sun misstated the amount of money appropriated by the state toward a new comprehensive cancer center at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Maryland General Assembly has authorized $30.5 million for the center.The Sun regrets the error.The Johns Hopkins Hospital has received the single largest gift since its inception 106 years ago -- the pledge of $20 million from the Baltimore-based Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation toward the construction of a clinical building for its comprehensive cancer center.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
In yesterday's editions of The Sun and some editions of The Evening Sun, the first name of Harry Weinberg, the late Baltimore real estate developer and philanthropist, was reported incorrectly.The Sun regrets the errors.With one of the highest concentrations of senior citizens in Baltimore County, the Pikesville area is getting its first apartment building for low-income elderly people.Ground will be broken Monday for Weinberg House, a seven-floor, 116-unit building named for Henry and Jeanette Weinberg, whose private foundation contributed $500,000 as the sponsor's equity in the joint public-private development.
NEWS
December 14, 1992
What's this? The low-profile Weinberg Foundation in the limelight at the Senator Theater to share the stage with Ginger Rogers? Yes, it happened last week to celebrate the opening of the new Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Senior Center at the Govans Presbyterian Church. Representing the $8 billion foundation, one of the largest in the country, was its director, Bernard Siegel, who exulted in the conversion of "a dream into a magnificent reality."The dream has been a triangular affair involving Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the city's Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, the long-established Govans church and the late Jewish philanthropist, Harry Weinberg, who had long been concerned with the plight of old people.
NEWS
By PABLO EISENBERG | October 22, 1992
Recent newspaper articles about the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation in Baltimore highlight the irresponsibility of the foundation and its trustees, the lax standards of accountability required of philanthropic institutions by both the Internal Revenue Service and the general public, and the lack of courage by non-profit organizations and foundations in the face of outrageous behavior by one of their colleague institutions.The five trustees of the Weinberg Foundation have apparently molded the institution in the image of its founder -- secretive, arrogant, contentious and cantankerous.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | November 6, 1990
For the first time in quite a while, Vincent Quayle expected to sleep easier last night. And it's all because of a man he never met but believes he would have liked nonetheless -- Harry Weinberg.Mr. Quayle, the director of the St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center, recently has closed two programs that benefit the poor because of a lack of money. Mr. Weinberg, Baltimore's lone billionaire, who died Sunday, decided that only the poor should benefit from his success and left nearly all of his money to a local foundation to aid the poor.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | March 29, 1992
An article about the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation in Sunday's editions of The Sun said that in life Harry Weinberg was "decried as a slumlord" whose wealth was built at the expense of the poor. In fact, Mr. Weinberg owned relative ly little residential real estate. His holdings were mostly in commercial real estate, much of it in downtown Baltimore and in deteriorated condition.The sun regrets the errors.The angels of mercy are again on the move today, traveling across town in a boxy old Lincoln Continental on their way to East Baltimore and the gleaming new headquarters of Meals-on-Wheels of Central Maryland.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | September 13, 1992
Philanthropy is a curious business. To the outsider it looks lik sheer fun, an endless game of playing Santa Claus. But scratch the surface and the business of philanthropy is serious indeed.Even the casual observer of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation could get the impression that the foundation's five directors are learning that lesson the hard way.The foundation was established in 1959 by Harry Weinberg, a Baltimore native who made a fortune in real estate. Mr. Weinberg died in 1990, and when his estate is fully settled the foundation is expected to be one of the 15 largest in the country.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | March 29, 1992
An article about the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation in Sunday's editions of The Sun said that in life Harry Weinberg was "decried as a slumlord" whose wealth was built at the expense of the poor. In fact, Mr. Weinberg owned relative ly little residential real estate. His holdings were mostly in commercial real estate, much of it in downtown Baltimore and in deteriorated condition.The sun regrets the errors.The angels of mercy are again on the move today, traveling across town in a boxy old Lincoln Continental on their way to East Baltimore and the gleaming new headquarters of Meals-on-Wheels of Central Maryland.
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