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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
For Ravens players, Harry Swayne's office is unavoidable. It sits a couple of yards from a side entrance to the locker room and almost directly across from the lounge where players watch television, get haircuts or take naps during rare down time amid the NFL grind. Swayne played 15 years in the NFL and has four Super Bowl rings, but his work space, aside from mementos and a Ray Rice figurine in the center of his desk, more resembles the office of a high school guidance counselor than a long-time football man. A poster of the Ravens' college graduates hangs over his desk.
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Mike Preston | August 4, 2014
In theory, the West Coast offense doesn't appear to be ideal for an East Coast football team. Gary Kubiak's version, though, might be the perfect fit for the Ravens. The short, quick passes still will be a major staple of their offense, but in Kubiak's system, the running game sets up the pass. When John Elway was the Denver Broncos' quarterback, he won back-to-back Super Bowl s in 1998 and 1999 with Kubiak as the offensive coordinator. Elway expects Kubiak to also be successful in Baltimore, where he will debut as the Ravens' offensive coordinator Thursday night against the San Francisco 49ers in their preseason opener.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
As right tackle Leon Searcy underwent surgery, the Ravens did some quick mending of their own. Training camp became a homecoming of sorts yesterday as the loss of Searcy until mid-October meant the promotion of a trusted colleague. Harry Swayne, who unceremoniously lost his starting job to Searcy this off-season, reassumed his spot on the right side - albeit accompanied with some ribbing from his teammates. So while the switch may admittedly be a step backward for the Super Bowl champions, they've already moved on. "From the offensive line standpoint, we haven't dropped a beat," Swayne said.
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By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Football players at Douglass have a full-time academic coach this fall helping them not just to improve their grades, but to navigate the requirements for college admission. The 1st and Goal program is a pilot initiative designed by the Family League of Baltimore. Douglass received a grant from NFL Player Engagement to fund the program, which focuses on improving all aspects of student athletes' lives. Douglass athletic director Tina Queen said she hopes to expand the program next fall to include all sports, but because more student athletes play football than any other sport at the school, the 1st and Goal program is expected to have an immediate impact.
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October 21, 1999
Line: Chiefs by 1.Vs. spread: Chiefs 2-3; Ravens 2-3.Series: First meeting.Quick hits: The Ravens are one of three teams (Vikings and Rams) that have not allowed a 100-yard rusher or a 100-yard receiver this season. The Chiefs have the NFL's No. 2 rushing offense (135 yards per game), even though they have no one with 200 yards rushing. QB Elvis Grbac was 26-for-31 for 268 yards, 1 TD passing and 1 TD rushing in his only start vs. Ravens (with 49ers).InjuriesCHIEFS: Doubtful: DE Dan Williams (knee)
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2007
Harry Swayne's calling has always been the same: lead others to daylight. He did it as a hole-carving offensive tackle for the Ravens' Super Bowl champions in the 2000 season. He does it now as team chaplain for the Chicago Bears. Once, the playbook was his Bible. Now, it's the other way around. For five years, Swayne, 42, has counseled Bears players and coaches on personal matters. He tackles marital concerns and anger management issues and sometimes offers financial advice. "There are guys [in pro football]
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
Orlando Pace could become the most prominent right tackle in Ravens history ... if he's healthy. Injury issues appear to be the biggest question mark for Pace, who is scheduled to meet team officials today. Pace, 33, a seven-time Pro Bowl left tackle, was released last week by the St. Louis Rams after missing 25 games over the past three seasons. If the Ravens are satisfied with the results of his physical examination, they are expected to make a strong run at him. It would probably signal the end for Willie Anderson, whose departure would open up $2.9 million in salary-cap space.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2001
The Ravens suffered a major blow six days into training camp when they learned yesterday that right tackle Leon Searcy will need surgery to repair a torn triceps tendon in his left arm. The former Pro Bowl lineman is expected to be sidelined 10 to 12 weeks. He could return to the team as early as the seventh game of the regular season. Searcy, 31, who signed as a free agent in March from the Jacksonville Jaguars, injured the tendon on the first play of Friday's intrasquad scrimmage. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed the tear yesterday.
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By Jamison Hensley | August 8, 2000
Thumbs up: After dropping a pass in the middle of the field, receiver Jermaine Lewis caught his next three, beating starting cornerbacks Chris McAlister and Duane Starks. Lewis had the longest reception of the day as well, a 40-yard catch in between Starks and safety Corey Harris. Thumbs down: Right guard Mike Flynn drew some heated criticism from coach Brian Billick. The first-year starter had trouble staying on his feet early in practice, then jumped offside on the third play of team drills.
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By Brent Jones and Paul McMullen and Brent Jones and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2001
After yesterday's scrimmage, offensive tackle Harry Swayne has rediscovered the backup's credo: Be ready at all times. Starter Leon Searcy injured his triceps on the first play of the scrimmage, putting Swayne back in his familiar position at right tackle with the first team. Swayne had spent the past week working at left tackle behind Jonathan Ogden. "It was a little strange," Swayne said. "Leon went down early. I pray to God he'll be OK. I haven't flip-flopped like that since my fourth year in the league.
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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
For Ravens players, Harry Swayne's office is unavoidable. It sits a couple of yards from a side entrance to the locker room and almost directly across from the lounge where players watch television, get haircuts or take naps during rare down time amid the NFL grind. Swayne played 15 years in the NFL and has four Super Bowl rings, but his work space, aside from mementos and a Ray Rice figurine in the center of his desk, more resembles the office of a high school guidance counselor than a long-time football man. A poster of the Ravens' college graduates hangs over his desk.
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Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
And then there was one. Kicker Matt Stover's decision to retire from football leaves Ravens' linebacker Ray Lewis as the only active NFL player to have suited up for the team in its first year in Baltimore (1996). Stover, 43, who last kicked for the Indianapolis Colts in 2009, has opted to return to Baltimore, where he played for 13 years and helped the Ravens win a Super Bowl. He and the Ravens were to hold a news conference Thursday, announcing Stover's retirement. The third-most accurate placekicker in NFL history, Stover scored 1,464 points for the franchise, one of five league records he holds.
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By Kevin Cowherd | September 24, 2009
This was at training camp 2008, in the conference room at the Best Western Hotel in Westminster, the place so quiet you could hear hearts beat. O.J. Brigance stood in front of the Ravens with a body ravaged by Lou Gehrig's disease and told them in essence: Don't look at me any differently. Don't feel sorry for me. I'm still here. I'm still one of you. He told ESPN's "Outside the Lines" program that he gave the speech for one simple reason. "They were going to have one of the toughest jobs in the league," he said of the Ravens.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
Orlando Pace could become the most prominent right tackle in Ravens history ... if he's healthy. Injury issues appear to be the biggest question mark for Pace, who is scheduled to meet team officials today. Pace, 33, a seven-time Pro Bowl left tackle, was released last week by the St. Louis Rams after missing 25 games over the past three seasons. If the Ravens are satisfied with the results of his physical examination, they are expected to make a strong run at him. It would probably signal the end for Willie Anderson, whose departure would open up $2.9 million in salary-cap space.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2007
Harry Swayne's calling has always been the same: lead others to daylight. He did it as a hole-carving offensive tackle for the Ravens' Super Bowl champions in the 2000 season. He does it now as team chaplain for the Chicago Bears. Once, the playbook was his Bible. Now, it's the other way around. For five years, Swayne, 42, has counseled Bears players and coaches on personal matters. He tackles marital concerns and anger management issues and sometimes offers financial advice. "There are guys [in pro football]
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
While the Ravens are uncertain about their chances to lock up cornerback Chris McAlister to a long-term deal by today's deadline, they patched up their void at right tackle and severed all ties with free-agent quarterback Kordell Stewart. The Ravens shored up the right side of their line by closing in on an agreement in principle with Orlando Brown last night and signing Ethan Brooks to a two-year contract. But the team's quarterback search will continue as Stewart, who drew fleeting interest from the Ravens, agreed to a two-year deal with the Chicago Bears.
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Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
And then there was one. Kicker Matt Stover's decision to retire from football leaves Ravens' linebacker Ray Lewis as the only active NFL player to have suited up for the team in its first year in Baltimore (1996). Stover, 43, who last kicked for the Indianapolis Colts in 2009, has opted to return to Baltimore, where he played for 13 years and helped the Ravens win a Super Bowl. He and the Ravens were to hold a news conference Thursday, announcing Stover's retirement. The third-most accurate placekicker in NFL history, Stover scored 1,464 points for the franchise, one of five league records he holds.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1999
The Ravens signed veteran Denver Broncos offensive tackle Harry Swayne to a four-year, $13.2 million contract yesterday, including a $5 million signing bonus, and they have had preliminary talks with two teams about moving up into the top six of the NFL draft in April to possibly select a quarterback.The addition of Swayne virtually filled two holes for the Ravens, enabling the team to move swing guard/tackle James Atkins to left guard next season. With Swayne and the recent addition of Charles Evans at fullback, the Ravens still want to find a big wide receiver such as North Carolina State's Torry Holt or Ohio State's David Boston, or a young quarterback to build around like Syracuse's Donovan McNabb or Oregon's Akili Smith.
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By Brent Jones and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2001
Having to watch Tennessee Titans end Jevon Kearse beat All-Pro Jacksonville Jaguars tackle Tony Boselli must be at least disconcerting to some linemen, downright frightening to others. Ravens tackle Jonathan Ogden , who will face Kearse this week, had his own view after watching tape of the matchup between Kearse and Boselli on film. "He played well, but I don't look at how he does against other people," Ogden said. "I just go out there and do my game. I know he's going to come ready to play, and I'm going to come ready to play.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
As right tackle Leon Searcy underwent surgery, the Ravens did some quick mending of their own. Training camp became a homecoming of sorts yesterday as the loss of Searcy until mid-October meant the promotion of a trusted colleague. Harry Swayne, who unceremoniously lost his starting job to Searcy this off-season, reassumed his spot on the right side - albeit accompanied with some ribbing from his teammates. So while the switch may admittedly be a step backward for the Super Bowl champions, they've already moved on. "From the offensive line standpoint, we haven't dropped a beat," Swayne said.
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