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NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 13, 2000
I am not jealous of the woman who writes the Harry Potter books. It does not bother me that her most recent book, "Harry Potter and the Enormous Royalty Check," has already become the best-selling book in world history, beating out her previous book, "Harry Potter Purchases Microsoft." It does not make me bitter to know that this woman's books are selling like crazy, while my own books -- some of which took me hours to write -- have become permanent nesting grounds for generations of bookstore-dwelling spiders.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,sun reporter | July 15, 2007
She knows them well, these books. Many times she's read them, listened to them on tape in her bedroom and on long car rides, debated pet theories with her dad. They are good friends, these books. She is coming of age with them. She was 8 when her father first suggested she might like them; now she is 14, analyzing the characters' actions through older eyes, thinking oh no, you shouldn't have said THAT. Is it any wonder that for Jackie Schiff, like millions of other readers, the imminent release of the final Harry Potter book is bittersweet?
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
GOOD NEWS THIS summer for kids of all ages in Harford County: There have been sightings of Harry Potter books ready for the borrowing at the nine county library branches. J. K. Rowling's best-selling series about Harry's adventures with wizards, witches and Muggles remains hugely popular as the library launches an ambitious summer reading program for children, "but some of the frenzy has subsided," said Phyllis Gallagher, a children's librarian in Harford. The Potter craze also has spawned interest in other classic fantasies, such as J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings," C. S. Lewis' "The Chronicles of Narnia" and T. H. White's "The Once and Future King."
FEATURES
By Motoko Rich and Motoko Rich,New York Times News Service | July 12, 2007
Of all the magical powers wielded by Harry Potter, perhaps none has cast a stronger spell than his supposed ability to transform the reading habits of young people. In what has become near mythology about the wildly popular series by J.K. Rowling, many parents, teachers, librarians and booksellers have credited it with inspiring a generation of kids to read for pleasure in a world dominated by instant messaging and music downloads. And so it has, for many children. But in keeping with the intricately plotted novels themselves, the truth about Harry Potter and reading is not quite so straightforward a success story.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
New Yorkers, even transplanted ones, are testy tenants. Once a comfortable home is found, it's hard to give it up. One long-standing resident is about to get forcibly evicted - albeit relocated to the penthouse suite. After more than 80 weeks on the adult fiction bestseller list, Harry Potter must settle into new digs tomorrow on a separate children's list in the New York Times. Potter's departure from the old fiction lists will immediately open up four spots for more mature fare. The change, while getting mixed reviews, is being watched as a barometer of the increasing influence of children's literature.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2003
Special deliveries in locked boxes don't usually call libraries to mind. But last week, it wasn't a jewelry store or a bank that got the sealed tubs - it was the branches of the Harford County Public Library, as some 70 copies of the much-coveted new Harry Potter book arrived. Not even the librarians got to sneak a peek. "No, absolutely not," said Evelyn Moessinger, the supervisor of the Bel Air Branch's children's department. The library was contractually obligated to keep the tubs locked until the book's official release yesterday, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2004
The third movie made from J.K. Rowling's series of novels about a young wizard, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, opened in theaters this weekend. In August, Rowling's fifth book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, is due out in paperback. Is there any end to Potter-mania? The numbers suggest not. Author J.K. Rowling's birthday: July 31, 1965 Harry Potter's birthday: July 31, 1980 Age Rowling began writing stories: 6 Year Rowling worked for Amnesty International in Africa: 1987 Year Rowling first imagined Harry Potter: 1990 Year Rowling taught English in Portugal: 1991 Year Rowling's daughter Jessica was born: 1993 Publisher's advance for the first book in 1996: $4,000 Number of years Rowling lived on the dole (British welfare)
NEWS
October 22, 1999
We all must support public education and other critical servicesElaine Hanus recently wrote that "perhaps opponents of vouchers should stop and say thanks once in a while to private school parents for the funds that they pay into the public system" ("Private school parents subsidize public education," letters, Oct. 17).Following that logic, does Ms. Hanus owe me thanks because I support the Fire Department and 911 services, even though I have never needed them?And for my contribution to senior centers or health facilities that I don't use?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sam Sessa and Chris Kaltenbach and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2004
Too much funny. Not enough scary. But, all things considered, pretty darn cool. Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, opening today in theaters nationwide, looks to be a crowd-pleaser, judging by the reactions of a half-dozen area elementary and middle-school pupils. The six, all fans of the book series on which the movie is based, struck their best movie-critic poses last week at an advance screening of Lemony Snicket. All enjoyed the movie, though with a few reservations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 31, 2005
DALLAS - Jim Dale must have a bit of a wizard in him. As the narrator of the Harry Potter audiobooks, how else can he explain his uncanny ability to bring to life such varied characters as Harry, Hermione, Ron and wise, old Professor Dumbledore? Well ... perhaps there is a little magic involved. Dale says he "inhabits" his characters. "That's really what an actor does. He inhabits the character from the description the author has given him," he said. He also likes to conjure up an audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 31, 2005
DALLAS - Jim Dale must have a bit of a wizard in him. As the narrator of the Harry Potter audiobooks, how else can he explain his uncanny ability to bring to life such varied characters as Harry, Hermione, Ron and wise, old Professor Dumbledore? Well ... perhaps there is a little magic involved. Dale says he "inhabits" his characters. "That's really what an actor does. He inhabits the character from the description the author has given him," he said. He also likes to conjure up an audience.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sam Sessa and Chris Kaltenbach and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2004
Too much funny. Not enough scary. But, all things considered, pretty darn cool. Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, opening today in theaters nationwide, looks to be a crowd-pleaser, judging by the reactions of a half-dozen area elementary and middle-school pupils. The six, all fans of the book series on which the movie is based, struck their best movie-critic poses last week at an advance screening of Lemony Snicket. All enjoyed the movie, though with a few reservations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2004
The third movie made from J.K. Rowling's series of novels about a young wizard, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, opened in theaters this weekend. In August, Rowling's fifth book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, is due out in paperback. Is there any end to Potter-mania? The numbers suggest not. Author J.K. Rowling's birthday: July 31, 1965 Harry Potter's birthday: July 31, 1980 Age Rowling began writing stories: 6 Year Rowling worked for Amnesty International in Africa: 1987 Year Rowling first imagined Harry Potter: 1990 Year Rowling taught English in Portugal: 1991 Year Rowling's daughter Jessica was born: 1993 Publisher's advance for the first book in 1996: $4,000 Number of years Rowling lived on the dole (British welfare)
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2003
Special deliveries in locked boxes don't usually call libraries to mind. But last week, it wasn't a jewelry store or a bank that got the sealed tubs - it was the branches of the Harford County Public Library, as some 70 copies of the much-coveted new Harry Potter book arrived. Not even the librarians got to sneak a peek. "No, absolutely not," said Evelyn Moessinger, the supervisor of the Bel Air Branch's children's department. The library was contractually obligated to keep the tubs locked until the book's official release yesterday, she said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
GOOD NEWS THIS summer for kids of all ages in Harford County: There have been sightings of Harry Potter books ready for the borrowing at the nine county library branches. J. K. Rowling's best-selling series about Harry's adventures with wizards, witches and Muggles remains hugely popular as the library launches an ambitious summer reading program for children, "but some of the frenzy has subsided," said Phyllis Gallagher, a children's librarian in Harford. The Potter craze also has spawned interest in other classic fantasies, such as J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings," C. S. Lewis' "The Chronicles of Narnia" and T. H. White's "The Once and Future King."
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
In the summer of 1999, Scott McDonald had a life-altering experience. He cracked open the first of the Harry Potter books and discovered something remarkable: He enjoyed reading. Next week, the Anne Arundel teen will have another memorable experience: breakfast with author J.K. Rowling, Harry's creator. The path that connects these two milestones starts back in 1996, when McDonald finished second grade and still could not read. Testing confirmed his parents' suspicions of a learning disorder, and he was diagnosed with dyslexia.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
In the summer of 1999, Scott McDonald had a life-altering experience. He cracked open the first of the Harry Potter books and discovered something remarkable: He enjoyed reading. Next week, the Anne Arundel teen will have another memorable experience: breakfast with author J.K. Rowling, Harry's creator. The path that connects these two milestones starts back in 1996, when McDonald finished second grade and still could not read. Testing confirmed his parents' suspicions of a learning disorder, and he was diagnosed with dyslexia.
FEATURES
By Motoko Rich and Motoko Rich,New York Times News Service | July 12, 2007
Of all the magical powers wielded by Harry Potter, perhaps none has cast a stronger spell than his supposed ability to transform the reading habits of young people. In what has become near mythology about the wildly popular series by J.K. Rowling, many parents, teachers, librarians and booksellers have credited it with inspiring a generation of kids to read for pleasure in a world dominated by instant messaging and music downloads. And so it has, for many children. But in keeping with the intricately plotted novels themselves, the truth about Harry Potter and reading is not quite so straightforward a success story.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 13, 2000
I am not jealous of the woman who writes the Harry Potter books. It does not bother me that her most recent book, "Harry Potter and the Enormous Royalty Check," has already become the best-selling book in world history, beating out her previous book, "Harry Potter Purchases Microsoft." It does not make me bitter to know that this woman's books are selling like crazy, while my own books -- some of which took me hours to write -- have become permanent nesting grounds for generations of bookstore-dwelling spiders.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
New Yorkers, even transplanted ones, are testy tenants. Once a comfortable home is found, it's hard to give it up. One long-standing resident is about to get forcibly evicted - albeit relocated to the penthouse suite. After more than 80 weeks on the adult fiction bestseller list, Harry Potter must settle into new digs tomorrow on a separate children's list in the New York Times. Potter's departure from the old fiction lists will immediately open up four spots for more mature fare. The change, while getting mixed reviews, is being watched as a barometer of the increasing influence of children's literature.
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