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Harry Hughes

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By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1995
When William Donald Schaefer was governor, the nicest thing you heard about his predecessor, Harry R. Hughes, was that his dog ruined the rugs in the Governor's Mansion.But with a new governor in Annapolis, it's Mr. Schaefer who is in the doghouse and Mr. Hughes who enjoys a warm welcome.Mr. Hughes has been named to the governing board of the University of Maryland System, while Mr. Schaefer can't get himself appointed to the board of a small rural college.Such is the topsy-turvy nature of politics in Maryland.
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NEWS
By William J. Thompson | June 11, 2014
On September 10, 1978, two days before the Maryland primary election, The Baltimore Sun published a poll showing Lt. Gov. Blair Lee III - who was acting governor in the wake of Gov. Marvin Mandel's political corruption conviction the previous year - leading his nearest Democratic gubernatorial rivals. Mr. Lee was ahead of Baltimore County Executive Theodore G. Venetoulis by 13 points and former state Senator and Transportation Secretary Harry R. Hughes by 14 points, with 22 percent of the primary voters still undecided.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 4, 2008
The State Highway Administration will dedicate its welcome center on Interstate 95 in Howard County to former Gov. Harry R. Hughes next week, honoring a longtime elected official who also was the state's first transportation secretary. Hughes, who is retired and lives in Denton, is expected to attend the ceremony Monday with current Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari, Neil J. Pedersen, the state highway administrator, and current and former legislators. Hughes, an 81-year-old Democrat, was transportation secretary from 1970 to 1977 and governor from 1979 to 1987.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
Patricia D. Hughes, who as Maryland's first lady actively supported women's causes, the arts and educational initiatives, was a key adviser to her husband, Gov. Harry Hughes, and led the way in an accurate historical restoration of Government House, died early Wednesday at her Denton home of Parkinson's disease. Mrs. Hughes was 79. "She was a wonderfully courageous lady who in recent years battled her health challenges with her husband by her side," Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 8, 1994
On mornings like this, the also-rans remember Harry Hughes and imagine his little piece of lightning striking them. The polls say Glendening and Bentley are winners next week, but those trailing the leaders embrace the sacred memory of Hughes, elected governor 16 autumns ago, who thus became Maryland's patron saint of political lost causes.A lost ball in high grass, Harry McGuirk famously called Hughes. People chuckled. A distant, hopeless loser, the pollsters said. Everybody who saw Hughes as bright and shiny after the Mandel years felt sorry for him: Such a nice young man. Such an embarrassment of a campaign.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
Blank Rome Comisky & McCauley LLP, a large Philadelphia law firm, said yesterday that it has added five attorneys -- including former Gov. Harry R. Hughes -- to a one-lawyer practice in Baltimore.The hiring of Hughes and four other lawyers from the Baltimore office of Patton Boggs LLP leaves that high-profile Washington firm without any lawyers in Baltimore."Baltimore is an important market for our expanding regional and national practice," said David F. Girard-diCarlo, Blank Rome's managing partner.
NEWS
June 25, 2006
On June 23, 2006, RICHARD LEE HUGHES, SR., of Street, MD; beloved husband of Lynette Hughes; devoted father of Richard Lee Hughes, Jr., and wife Michele Hughes and Donald Harry Hughes; loving son of Margaret Ledlich Hughes and the late Raymond Harry Hughes; brother of Raymond E. Hughes and his wife Joanna Hughes, Linda Ayres and her husband Arthur Ayres. Also survived by 11 nieces and nephews and 12 grand nieces and nephews. Services will be held at the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, P.A., in Abingdon, MD, on Tuesday, June 27, 2006, at 10:00 A.M. Interment will be in Darlington Cemetery, Darlington, MD. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Monday, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those who desire, may make contributions to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA. 23058.
NEWS
By Bradford Jacobs | September 15, 1995
IT'S BUSH league," said a caller on one of the then-budding, radio-talk shows."That stuff went out with horsehair sofas," said another.So it was a little bush, a little horse hairy, this posture The Evening Sun struck in the Spring of 1978. But in its bushy, hairy way it worked. It made a little history.The sniffy remarks were aimed at an editorial endorsing Harry Hughes for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination. Sniffs aside, Mr. Hughes was nominated and, that fall, elected by a record majority.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
ROBERT S. JONES, III, age 71, of Lewes, DE, died Wednesday, December 1, 2004, at his residence. Mr. Jones was born January 22, 1933 in Baltimore, MD to the late Robert S. Jones, Jr. and Ida F. "Fritz" Jones. Mr. Jones was employed by Verizon for 42 years as an engineering assistant. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a member of American Legion Post #28 and AMVETS Post #2. He is survived by his wife Mary E. (Armsworthy) Jones; two daughters, Kathleen Law and Leslie Burgoyne; one son Stephen Jones; and three grandchildren, Courtney Law, Zachary Jones and Kyle Jones.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 24, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- Harry Hughes, said the late Harry J. McGuirk rather smugly just about 16 years ago, ''is a lost ball in the high grass.'' It was a fine phrase, and Mr. McGuirk savored it. It was fine when he said it because it was both cruel and true, but it's only memorable now because its truth had such a short life.In 1978, Harry Hughes was running for governor in the Democratic primary much the way American Joe Miedusiewski began his campaign this year. He knew he didn't have a chance, but he had some things he wanted to say that weren't getting said, and he thought some of the voters might appreciate a little more variety on the ballot.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | January 4, 2008
The State Highway Administration will dedicate its welcome center on Interstate 95 in Howard County to former Gov. Harry R. Hughes next week, honoring a longtime elected official who also was the state's first transportation secretary. Hughes, who is retired and lives in Denton, is expected to attend the ceremony Monday with current Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari, Neil J. Pedersen, the state highway administrator, and current and former legislators. Hughes, an 81-year-old Democrat, was transportation secretary from 1970 to 1977 and governor from 1979 to 1987.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 20, 2007
The autobiography of Harry R. Hughes, 57th governor of Maryland, is a testament to the power of media and image in modern America - and to the ability of one person to achieve profound change. Though he had made an extraordinary witness for integrity in government - resigning as state secretary of transportation to protest bid rigging - Mr. Hughes may be best remembered today for a description of the style he adopted in the governor's office. "Laid back" was the label du jour. It suggested a languid, devil-may-care approach to anything in life.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | November 6, 2006
CENTREVILLE -- The living room of the headmaster's house at the Gunston Day School is tastefully furnished with wingback chairs and a grand piano. But when former Gov. Harry Hughes enters with his lunch on a recent visit, he takes the worst possible seat - a brown plastic folding chair, where he sits and delicately balances a plate on his knee. Someone asks why he didn't choose a more comfortable chair. "This one seemed fine," says Hughes, who will turn 80 next week and hasn't lost the air of modesty and decency that served him well over 30 years in public office.
NEWS
June 25, 2006
On June 23, 2006, RICHARD LEE HUGHES, SR., of Street, MD; beloved husband of Lynette Hughes; devoted father of Richard Lee Hughes, Jr., and wife Michele Hughes and Donald Harry Hughes; loving son of Margaret Ledlich Hughes and the late Raymond Harry Hughes; brother of Raymond E. Hughes and his wife Joanna Hughes, Linda Ayres and her husband Arthur Ayres. Also survived by 11 nieces and nephews and 12 grand nieces and nephews. Services will be held at the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, P.A., in Abingdon, MD, on Tuesday, June 27, 2006, at 10:00 A.M. Interment will be in Darlington Cemetery, Darlington, MD. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Monday, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those who desire, may make contributions to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA. 23058.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
ROBERT S. JONES, III, age 71, of Lewes, DE, died Wednesday, December 1, 2004, at his residence. Mr. Jones was born January 22, 1933 in Baltimore, MD to the late Robert S. Jones, Jr. and Ida F. "Fritz" Jones. Mr. Jones was employed by Verizon for 42 years as an engineering assistant. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a member of American Legion Post #28 and AMVETS Post #2. He is survived by his wife Mary E. (Armsworthy) Jones; two daughters, Kathleen Law and Leslie Burgoyne; one son Stephen Jones; and three grandchildren, Courtney Law, Zachary Jones and Kyle Jones.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
Blank Rome Comisky & McCauley LLP, a large Philadelphia law firm, said yesterday that it has added five attorneys -- including former Gov. Harry R. Hughes -- to a one-lawyer practice in Baltimore.The hiring of Hughes and four other lawyers from the Baltimore office of Patton Boggs LLP leaves that high-profile Washington firm without any lawyers in Baltimore."Baltimore is an important market for our expanding regional and national practice," said David F. Girard-diCarlo, Blank Rome's managing partner.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 20, 2007
The autobiography of Harry R. Hughes, 57th governor of Maryland, is a testament to the power of media and image in modern America - and to the ability of one person to achieve profound change. Though he had made an extraordinary witness for integrity in government - resigning as state secretary of transportation to protest bid rigging - Mr. Hughes may be best remembered today for a description of the style he adopted in the governor's office. "Laid back" was the label du jour. It suggested a languid, devil-may-care approach to anything in life.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1994
Del. Gerry L. Brewster, a Baltimore County Democrat, made official yesterday what has been no secret for a long time. He's running for the 2nd District congressional seat being vacated by Republican Helen D. Bentley.Sounding much like Del. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a GOP candidate for the same seat, Mr. Brewster presented a get-tough-on-crime theme in an address to about 200 supporters in front of the Old Courthouse Building in Towson."Government has clearly failed to fulfill its No. 1 obligation, to protect its citizenry," said Mr. Brewster, 36. "Our kids can't walk home from school without fear of drive-by shootings, and all citizens are not safe walking the streets anymore."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
THE LATE HARRY "Soft Shoes" McGuirk might have called him Diamond Jim in the political rough.The political ruminations of Maryland's former economic development boss, James T. Brady, remind many of 1978, when Harry R. Hughes rose from obscurity to victory by near acclamation. In the midst of a gubernatorial campaign which seems somnolent, Brady's water-testing this year is provocative.It was Senator McGuirk of the Stonewall Democratic Club in Baltimore who, in 1978, called Hughes a lost ball in tall grass.
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