Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHarry Houdini
IN THE NEWS

Harry Houdini

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | October 30, 1994
One of Baltimore's most famous spectacles took place April )) 26, 1916, outside the old Sun building on Charles Street. On that date, Houdini, the world-famous magician and escape artist, was suspended 50 feet in the air, upside-down in a straitjacket. The week before, in Washington, he had escaped from a similar situation as a crowd estimated at 100,000 gathered in the streets.In Baltimore, more than 50,000 people were on hand. In about 2 1/2 minutes, he was out of the jacket, to the delight of the huge crowd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
One of author Steven Galloway's most vivid childhood memories is of sitting at a picnic table when he was about 5 years old, playing checkers with his great-uncle Johnny. "He let me beat him, and I knew he let me beat him," Galloway said recently when describing the inspiration for his new book, "The Confabulist. " "But I felt incredibly proud and happy because that meant that I had some merit in his world. "The problem is that Uncle Johnny died the year before I was born. " Since making that unsettling realization, Galloway, now 38, has been fascinated by false recollections.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1998
In the 16th century, a British country gentleman named Reginold Scot published a book on magic tricks, hoping it would stem the tide of witch-hangings, a popular pastime just then in the English countryside. Scot believed that if people understood that magic performances were the result of skillful - but purely human - manipulations, they would be less likely to see the hand of the Devil in every innocent event.Alas, Scot proved an innocent when it came to his own appreciation for the tenacity of ignorance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Baltimore escape artist Spencer Horsman's willingness to almost die in front of an audience is proving a smash on NBC's "America's Got Talent. " "Yeah, apparently they like the fact that I'm willing to almost kill and mangle myself every round," Horsman said with a laugh, just a day after his latest escape earned him a spot in the show's final round, being taped this month in New York. Truly, the 26-year-old, heretofore best known for performing on weekends at his Federal Hill club, Illusions, is going national.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | April 29, 2007
Harry Houdini never gets far from the news. There's always a movie coming out, or a book, and every other magician has to face comparison to the legendary master. Here, the California poet Kay Ryan encapsulates the man and says something wise about celebrity. - Ted Kooser "Houdini" Each escape involved some art, some hokum, and at least a brief incomprehensible exchange between the man and metal during which the chains were not so much broken as he and they blended. At the end of each such mix he had to extract himself.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
FOR SEVERAL weeks, his new owners called this four-legged escape artist Harry Houdini.Every time they left home, so did Harry.This mixed-breed with the face of a blond Labrador and the body TTC of a basset hound was found several months ago wandering in the Govans area where Sue Diffenderffen and Diane Fenton live. They gave him a home but found he had to have company at all times.He was thin, hungry and afraid. One of his ribs stuck out farther than the others, and it is now diagnosed as possibly an oldbreak from a hard kick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 25, 2001
The musical "Ragtime" interweaves the stories of three fictitious families with various historical figures. Here's a rundown of some of the real-life characters: Henry Ford (1863-1947). Automobile manufacturer who pioneered the assembly line, on which 15 million affordable Model T cars were mass-produced between 1908 and 1928. Ford Motor Co. became the world's largest automobile manufacturer; the company's founder kept unions out of his plant until 1941. Emma Goldman (1869-1940). Russian-born anarchist who immigrated to the United States in 1886.
NEWS
By Madeline Bryant and Madeline Bryant,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Children are always looking for a good read - it helps postpone bedtime like nothing else. Here are some titles that stand up equally well in daylight. PICTURE BOOKS Fourteen masters of illustration answer the eternal comedic question Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? (Dial: 40 pp., $16.99). The nearly wordless responses range from the obvious to the absurd. Mo Willems' chicken is being "grilled" by police after running "afowl" of the law, while Jerry Pinkney's wants to attend a lavish tea party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Baltimore escape artist Spencer Horsman's willingness to almost die in front of an audience is proving a smash on NBC's "America's Got Talent. " "Yeah, apparently they like the fact that I'm willing to almost kill and mangle myself every round," Horsman said with a laugh, just a day after his latest escape earned him a spot in the show's final round, being taped this month in New York. Truly, the 26-year-old, heretofore best known for performing on weekends at his Federal Hill club, Illusions, is going national.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | August 9, 1993
Most people display their best china in a dining room cabinet. George Goebel keeps his handcuff collection there.Goebel, a master magician and illusionist who doubles as the owner of a downtown theatrical costuming business, began collecting restraining devices about 40 years ago. His unusual hobby began as an offshoot of his life-long interest in the great Harry Houdini (1874-1926), who was once billed as "the world's handcuff king and prison breaker.""Some people view handcuffs as a military device or piece of police equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
Every Friday night for the past three years, to the delight of an audience, magician Spencer Horsman has escaped from his straitjacket. By his own estimate, he's done the trick 400 times. And until a recent Friday, he'd never made any missteps in a routine, invented by Harry Houdini 100 years ago, that is fraught with peril. Near the end of the routine, while hanging from a crane, he had almost freed himself from the jacket. But suddenly, with all the spinning, a bolt loosened, and the crane, the straitjacket and the 125-pound magician hanging from it all fell on the stage at Federal Hill's Illusions: Magic Bar and Lounge . One minute, the audience was clapping, bartender Ben Rosen recalled; and the next, there was "thud" and "a bunch of gasps.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | April 29, 2007
Harry Houdini never gets far from the news. There's always a movie coming out, or a book, and every other magician has to face comparison to the legendary master. Here, the California poet Kay Ryan encapsulates the man and says something wise about celebrity. - Ted Kooser "Houdini" Each escape involved some art, some hokum, and at least a brief incomprehensible exchange between the man and metal during which the chains were not so much broken as he and they blended. At the end of each such mix he had to extract himself.
NEWS
By Madeline Bryant and Madeline Bryant,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Children are always looking for a good read - it helps postpone bedtime like nothing else. Here are some titles that stand up equally well in daylight. PICTURE BOOKS Fourteen masters of illustration answer the eternal comedic question Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? (Dial: 40 pp., $16.99). The nearly wordless responses range from the obvious to the absurd. Mo Willems' chicken is being "grilled" by police after running "afowl" of the law, while Jerry Pinkney's wants to attend a lavish tea party.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
A sucker for Halloween, our eyes lit up at the City Paper listing for an "Old-Fashioned Seance." None of these New Age seances for us, no sir. Give us a pitch-black room, a red light and the ghost of Harry Houdini ("dead" 75 years) or Elvis any day. We want the earth to move -- or just the table. The listing for the Sunday seance was even a little scary: Due to threats before previous seances, you must call Spiritual Path for the location. We called Robin Cushner, founder and leader of Spiritual Path -- the host of the seance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 25, 2001
The musical "Ragtime" interweaves the stories of three fictitious families with various historical figures. Here's a rundown of some of the real-life characters: Henry Ford (1863-1947). Automobile manufacturer who pioneered the assembly line, on which 15 million affordable Model T cars were mass-produced between 1908 and 1928. Ford Motor Co. became the world's largest automobile manufacturer; the company's founder kept unions out of his plant until 1941. Emma Goldman (1869-1940). Russian-born anarchist who immigrated to the United States in 1886.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
LYNCHBURG, Va. -- If any garden-variety magician can make a lovely assistant vanish, can thousands of the world's magicians, working in concert, perform the same trick on a reviled television program?So far ... no.By all reports, Fox Television has remained unmoved in the face of methods both magical and mundane. To the trepidation of magicians everywhere, the network this fall is going forward with two more of its popular specials in which a magician in disguise reveals how hitherto astounding feats of magic are really accomplished.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
New York -- Maurine Christopher's dark apartment has the eerie aura of a fun house fallen mute. Astral hands and floating heads, a Breughel scene of magic mayhem, and posters of mysterious, long-dead men with gleaming eyes await visitors inside the rambling suite on Central Park West. The curtains are drawn to protect the collection from natural light.Since her husband, the world-famous Baltimore magician and author Milbourne Christopher, died in 1984, Maurine has spent her days painstakingly cataloging his prize possessions, among them thousands of letters and books acquired by his hero, Harry Houdini.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
LYNCHBURG, Va. -- If any garden-variety magician can make a lovely assistant vanish, can thousands of the world's magicians, working in concert, perform the same trick on a reviled television program?So far ... no.By all reports, Fox Television has remained unmoved in the face of methods both magical and mundane. To the trepidation of magicians everywhere, the network this fall is going forward with two more of its popular specials in which a magician in disguise reveals how hitherto astounding feats of magic are really accomplished.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1998
In the 16th century, a British country gentleman named Reginold Scot published a book on magic tricks, hoping it would stem the tide of witch-hangings, a popular pastime just then in the English countryside. Scot believed that if people understood that magic performances were the result of skillful - but purely human - manipulations, they would be less likely to see the hand of the Devil in every innocent event.Alas, Scot proved an innocent when it came to his own appreciation for the tenacity of ignorance.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
New York -- Maurine Christopher's dark apartment has the eerie aura of a fun house fallen mute. Astral hands and floating heads, a Breughel scene of magic mayhem, and posters of mysterious, long-dead men with gleaming eyes await visitors inside the rambling suite on Central Park West. The curtains are drawn to protect the collection from natural light.Since her husband, the world-famous Baltimore magician and author Milbourne Christopher, died in 1984, Maurine has spent her days painstakingly cataloging his prize possessions, among them thousands of letters and books acquired by his hero, Harry Houdini.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.