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By MIKE KLINGAMAN and MIKE KLINGAMAN,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2005
He walked in off the street 51 years ago, a young Korean War veteran seeking work with the fledgling Orioles. Though he never played organized baseball, Harry Dalton landed a small front office job for $45 a week. It was one of the smartest moves the club ever made. Dalton, who died yesterday at 77 of Parkinson's disease at his daughter's home in Scottsdale, Ariz., helped sculpt some of the Orioles' greatest teams. He worked his way up to general manager and ran the franchise in its heyday, from the 1966 to 1971 seasons.
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By MIKE KLINGAMAN and MIKE KLINGAMAN,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2005
He walked in off the street 51 years ago, a young Korean War veteran seeking work with the fledgling Orioles. Though he never played organized baseball, Harry Dalton landed a small front office job for $45 a week. It was one of the smartest moves the club ever made. Dalton, who died yesterday at 77 of Parkinson's disease at his daughter's home in Scottsdale, Ariz., helped sculpt some of the Orioles' greatest teams. He worked his way up to general manager and ran the franchise in its heyday, from the 1966 to 1971 seasons.
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NEWS
March 9, 1999
Franklin Seaney Cooper, 90, a pioneer in speech research whose work was later applied to computerized speech synthesis, died Feb. 20 in Palo Alto, Calif. In 1973, he was one of six experts who were asked to investigate the 18 1/2-minute gap in a tape made by President Richard M. Nixon in the Oval Office, which became a part of the Watergate investigation.Deane F. Johnson, 80, an entertainment industry lawyer and corporate executive prominent in nonprofit institutions, died Feb. 28 in Beverly Hills, Calif.
NEWS
March 9, 1999
Franklin Seaney Cooper, 90, a pioneer in speech research whose work was later applied to computerized speech synthesis, died Feb. 20 in Palo Alto, Calif. In 1973, he was one of six experts who were asked to investigate the 18 1/2-minute gap in a tape made by President Richard M. Nixon in the Oval Office, which became a part of the Watergate investigation.Deane F. Johnson, 80, an entertainment industry lawyer and corporate executive prominent in nonprofit institutions, died Feb. 28 in Beverly Hills, Calif.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 23, 1994
There are no expressions of regret from John Schuerholz when asked about the coveted opportunities he passed over to take on other baseball obligations, preferring instead to remain as general manager of the Atlanta Braves. The Baltimore Orioles contacted him this time a year ago about becoming their chief executive and, only weeks ago, the Chicago Cubs made an extraordinary offer.Tempted? Perhaps. Yet his allegiance to Atlanta overrode any desire to change addresses and inherit new responsibilities, even if Baltimore would have meant coming home to be with family and friends.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1991
DETROIT -- Glenn Davis returned to the Baltimore Orioles' lineup last night after missing five games because of back spasms."He came in and said he wanted to try it," said manager John Oates. "He's fine so he's in there."Davis was hitting .321 in his past nine games before leaving the Sept. 20 game in Cleveland with mid-back pain.Oates was reserving judgment on whether Davis would return to the batting order today."We'll wait to decide on tomorrow's first baseman, depending on how healthy Glenn is," he said.
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By John Steadman | March 10, 1996
CAREFREE, Ariz. -- Halfway up a mountain, where coyotes don't need a moon to strike up a howl and the desert hues paint a picture of breathtaking beauty, lives a prematurely retired baseball executive named Harry Dalton, who helped more than anyone else to shape the career that took Earl Weaver to the summit and, ultimately, Hall of Fame accreditation.When Dalton, driving home from the post office in tiny downtown Carefree, heard a radio report that Weaver had been elected to the highest honor the game bestows, he screamed a one-word reaction: "Sensational!"
SPORTS
By JIM HENNEMAN | December 26, 1993
Looking back, but mostly ahead:All things considered, 1993 was a good year for baseball. It brought expansion, along with the expected higher batting averages and ERAs, and avoided a strike or lockout.And it concluded with one of the most exciting finishes in World Series history, with apologies to Mitch Williams, the ringmaster of excitement.But, of all the memorable happenings, the one that stands out for this observer didn't take place on the field. Instead, it happened in the dugout after the Philadelphia Phillies beat the Atlanta Braves to win the National League pennant.
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By John Steadman | June 15, 1992
That Essex Community College persevered and prevailed, winning the Junior College World Series, is underlined by a recitation of the numbers. Six-hundred-forty-eight teams, excluding California, were involved, beginning with a regional format and concluding in the grand finale at Grand Junction, Colo. It was fitting that in the process George Henderson, endowed with keen teaching and strategic baseball skills, was proclaimed National Coach of the Year.At one point, Essex won 13 in a row, which helped add up to an overall record of 34-6.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | May 24, 1995
Much of the Baltimore Orioles' past reflects into focus with a return visit of Harry Dalton, who stocked and shaped the once-rich talent lode when the team dominated the supply line of exceptional players flowing from the minors to the major leagues.It was another time, a different era, before the common draft, when intelligence and judgment represented more important factors than today.Dalton, who left the Milwaukee Brewers last October at the urging of club president Bud Selig, is in retirement.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | March 10, 1996
CAREFREE, Ariz. -- Halfway up a mountain, where coyotes don't need a moon to strike up a howl and the desert hues paint a picture of breathtaking beauty, lives a prematurely retired baseball executive named Harry Dalton, who helped more than anyone else to shape the career that took Earl Weaver to the summit and, ultimately, Hall of Fame accreditation.When Dalton, driving home from the post office in tiny downtown Carefree, heard a radio report that Weaver had been elected to the highest honor the game bestows, he screamed a one-word reaction: "Sensational!"
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | May 24, 1995
Much of the Baltimore Orioles' past reflects into focus with a return visit of Harry Dalton, who stocked and shaped the once-rich talent lode when the team dominated the supply line of exceptional players flowing from the minors to the major leagues.It was another time, a different era, before the common draft, when intelligence and judgment represented more important factors than today.Dalton, who left the Milwaukee Brewers last October at the urging of club president Bud Selig, is in retirement.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 23, 1994
There are no expressions of regret from John Schuerholz when asked about the coveted opportunities he passed over to take on other baseball obligations, preferring instead to remain as general manager of the Atlanta Braves. The Baltimore Orioles contacted him this time a year ago about becoming their chief executive and, only weeks ago, the Chicago Cubs made an extraordinary offer.Tempted? Perhaps. Yet his allegiance to Atlanta overrode any desire to change addresses and inherit new responsibilities, even if Baltimore would have meant coming home to be with family and friends.
SPORTS
By JIM HENNEMAN | December 26, 1993
Looking back, but mostly ahead:All things considered, 1993 was a good year for baseball. It brought expansion, along with the expected higher batting averages and ERAs, and avoided a strike or lockout.And it concluded with one of the most exciting finishes in World Series history, with apologies to Mitch Williams, the ringmaster of excitement.But, of all the memorable happenings, the one that stands out for this observer didn't take place on the field. Instead, it happened in the dugout after the Philadelphia Phillies beat the Atlanta Braves to win the National League pennant.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 15, 1992
That Essex Community College persevered and prevailed, winning the Junior College World Series, is underlined by a recitation of the numbers. Six-hundred-forty-eight teams, excluding California, were involved, beginning with a regional format and concluding in the grand finale at Grand Junction, Colo. It was fitting that in the process George Henderson, endowed with keen teaching and strategic baseball skills, was proclaimed National Coach of the Year.At one point, Essex won 13 in a row, which helped add up to an overall record of 34-6.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1991
DETROIT -- Glenn Davis returned to the Baltimore Orioles' lineup last night after missing five games because of back spasms."He came in and said he wanted to try it," said manager John Oates. "He's fine so he's in there."Davis was hitting .321 in his past nine games before leaving the Sept. 20 game in Cleveland with mid-back pain.Oates was reserving judgment on whether Davis would return to the batting order today."We'll wait to decide on tomorrow's first baseman, depending on how healthy Glenn is," he said.
SPORTS
April 3, 2006
Noon Gates open 12:25-1:25 Orioles batting practice 1:25-2:05 Devil Rays batting practice 2:05-2:25 Field preparation 2:25 Ceremonies begin 3:05 Game begins Tributes Commemorating late photographer Jerry Wachter, executive Harry Dalton, outfielder Pat Kelly and player and coach Elrod Hendricks First pitches Hendricks' sons, Ryan and Ian National anthem American tenor Richard Troxell Presenting colors Army (Baltimore Recruiting Battalion)...
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | April 1, 2006
Where am I? Fooled by the unseasonably warm temperature. This is Maryland. The people aren't dressed like they're headed to a nightclub, even when buying milk at the Circle-K. And they're speaking English. I'm weirded out. What I wouldn't give to have one homeless guy in a pink T-shirt trying to sell me a newspaper. The Orioles left themselves open to some criticism this spring, with the Melvin Mora negotiations dragging along and the offense shutting down and their spring training record looking like it should belong to the expansion Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
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