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By Ray Frager | February 17, 2009
Ken Burns' Baseball 8 p.m. [MLB Network] The edition of the documentary deals with the dominant Yankees, Dodgers and Giants of the 1950s, and it's the "seventh inning" - which means halfway through the show, Harry Caray (left) will come on and sing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame." Or perhaps we'll get a clip of John Denver doing "Thank God I'm a Country Boy."
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SPORTS
By Ray Frager | February 17, 2009
Ken Burns' Baseball 8 p.m. [MLB Network] The edition of the documentary deals with the dominant Yankees, Dodgers and Giants of the 1950s, and it's the "seventh inning" - which means halfway through the show, Harry Caray (left) will come on and sing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame." Or perhaps we'll get a clip of John Denver doing "Thank God I'm a Country Boy."
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SPORTS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
He was loud. He was obnoxious. He was the worst homer in the history of baseball broadcasting.But Harry Caray was my buddy.What year was it -- 1964? We are in the old Chevy, Mom and Dad in the front seat, my brother and I leaning forward. (This was long before seat belts.) It's a Sunday afternoon, I remember that, and the visors are pulled down to block the sun and we're driving past another cornfield in Iowa, and we're straining to hear the scratchy voice on the car radio.The Cardinals are winning, the Phillies are losing, the National League pennant is up for grabs and Harry Caray is going nuts.
SPORTS
By From staff reports | February 21, 1998
BaseballSheffield a no-show, gets OK to report six days late to campGary Sheffield says he can best prepare for the season by skipping the first week of spring training, and the Florida Marlins say they believe him.Sheffield failed to show up yesterday for the first full-squad workout with the Marlins, who were already short of familiar faces. The team gave Sheffield permission at the last minute to report six days late so he could continue working out at home in St. Petersburg, Fla., with his personal trainer.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
Someone else will have to preside over the seventh-inning stretch at Wrigley Field now that Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray has passed away, but his friends, fans and colleagues are certain of one thing.No one will ever replace him."Harry Caray was one of a kind, first and foremost a baseball fan," said Dodgers broadcasting legend Vin Scully. "As a fan, he used a microphone to release his emotions. He could be critical, contentious and bombastic, or he could be lovable and full of praise."
NEWS
February 20, 1998
HARRY CARAY died Wednesday. With him went one of broadcasting's last links to baseball of yesteryear, when fans who couldn't be at the game felt just as privileged to hear it described by broadcasters whose skills could be nearly as spectacular as those of the players on the field.Mel Allen, Red Barber -- Mr. Caray may not have been as good as they were as descriptive announcers. But like Dizzy Dean, he brought into the broadcasting booth an exceptional knowledge of baseball and a comforting ability to portray the game from the perspective of the fan.Listening to Mr. Caray on the radio or later on television during his 53-year career, you couldn't help but relax and enjoy.
SPORTS
By From staff reports | February 21, 1998
BaseballSheffield a no-show, gets OK to report six days late to campGary Sheffield says he can best prepare for the season by skipping the first week of spring training, and the Florida Marlins say they believe him.Sheffield failed to show up yesterday for the first full-squad workout with the Marlins, who were already short of familiar faces. The team gave Sheffield permission at the last minute to report six days late so he could continue working out at home in St. Petersburg, Fla., with his personal trainer.
SPORTS
By Chicago Tribune | July 19, 1994
CHICAGO -- Legendary Chicago Cubs broadcaster Harry Caray, who suffered facial injuries when he fell in Miami before a game June 23, will be back at work Friday.According to a Tribune Broadcasting official, Caray's schedule will be restricted for the rest of the season to most home games and selected road series.
SPORTS
By Chicago Tribune | September 16, 1995
CHICAGO -- WGN Radio apologized Thursday for a remark Chicago Cubs broadcaster Harry Caray made earlier this week during a taping of the pregame "Jim Riggleman Show."Caray's words came Tuesday in a question posed to Riggleman about Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Hideo Nomo, a rookie from Japan who was scheduled to pitch that night.In a joking tone, Caray asked the Cubs manager, "Well, my eyes are slanty enough, how 'bout yours?"Riggleman, clearly flustered, quickly switched the subject to baseball.
SPORTS
June 7, 1998
Cubs: The team hasn't made an error in eight games. Hall of Famer Billy Williams, the team's hitting coach, sang "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" during the Harry Caray memorial seventh-inning stretch.Dodgers: Eric Young stole two bases, giving him 26 for the season, tops in the majors.Indians: Pitcher Jaret Wright reached first on an infield single when he tried to sacrifice and no one fielded his bunt in the eighth. It was his first hit in seven career at-bats.Mariners: Ken Griffey's homer was the 317th of his career, tying him with George Brett for 67th place.
NEWS
February 20, 1998
HARRY CARAY died Wednesday. With him went one of broadcasting's last links to baseball of yesteryear, when fans who couldn't be at the game felt just as privileged to hear it described by broadcasters whose skills could be nearly as spectacular as those of the players on the field.Mel Allen, Red Barber -- Mr. Caray may not have been as good as they were as descriptive announcers. But like Dizzy Dean, he brought into the broadcasting booth an exceptional knowledge of baseball and a comforting ability to portray the game from the perspective of the fan.Listening to Mr. Caray on the radio or later on television during his 53-year career, you couldn't help but relax and enjoy.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
Someone else will have to preside over the seventh-inning stretch at Wrigley Field now that Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray has passed away, but his friends, fans and colleagues are certain of one thing.No one will ever replace him."Harry Caray was one of a kind, first and foremost a baseball fan," said Dodgers broadcasting legend Vin Scully. "As a fan, he used a microphone to release his emotions. He could be critical, contentious and bombastic, or he could be lovable and full of praise."
SPORTS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
He was loud. He was obnoxious. He was the worst homer in the history of baseball broadcasting.But Harry Caray was my buddy.What year was it -- 1964? We are in the old Chevy, Mom and Dad in the front seat, my brother and I leaning forward. (This was long before seat belts.) It's a Sunday afternoon, I remember that, and the visors are pulled down to block the sun and we're driving past another cornfield in Iowa, and we're straining to hear the scratchy voice on the car radio.The Cardinals are winning, the Phillies are losing, the National League pennant is up for grabs and Harry Caray is going nuts.
SPORTS
April 2, 1996
Cardinals: Brian Jordan (Milford Mill) was placed on the 15-day disabled list retroactive to March 31. He injured his right thumb diving for a ball in an exhibition game over the weekend. He will be a cast for a week.Cubs: Northwestern football coach Gary Barnett, who led the school to the Rose Bowl last season, threw out the first pitch and then joined Harry Caray in leading the crowd in the familiar seven-inning stretch singing of "Take Me Out To The Ball Game." . . .Chicago, which plays 15 of its first 20 games at home, is 46-34-1 in home openers at Wrigley Field.
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
"Confessions of a Baseball Purist," by Jon Miller, with Mark Hyman. Simon & Schuster. 269 pages. $24.Move to Baltimore, and two things will happen. Strangers will call you "hon" for no apparent reason. And baseball fans will shake their heads mournfully and say, "You should have heard Jon Miller."If you can imagine Cal Ripken calling in sick, then you can imagine the surprising jolt this city's sports fans felt two years ago when Miller was not offered a new contract and eventually accepted the announcing job for the San Francisco Giants.
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