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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 15, 1992
A rare appearance by Harry Belafonte will be the highlight of an unusually glittering Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pops lineup next season.Belafonte, who will appear without the BSO, is one of the truly legendary figures in American popular music: He was the first singer to sell more than 1 million copies of an individual album, the first African-American to win an Emmy, and he was also a Tony winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center award.Other performers on the 1992-'93 roster, which the BSO released Wednesday, include the famed a cappella group the Swingle Singers, composer-conductor Henry Mancini, the Smothers Brothers comedy team and BSO music director David Zinman, who will lead the orchestra in music from "Porgy and Bess" and "Carmen Jones."
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
One measure of a great biography is that you start into it thinking you know the subject. and by the end of it, you admit to yourself that you knew only the tip of the iceberg. "Sing Your Song," n HBO documentary film on the life and word of Harry Belafonte premiering at 10 p.m. Monday is a great biography in just that way. Yes, he's the guy who sang "Banana Boat (Day-O)" in the 1950s, and has a huge seller of an album (back when people still knew what record album and LP meant)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 30, 1998
Harry Belafonte will receive the Heritage Lifetime Achievement Award at the Heritage Shadows of a Silver Screen Black Film Museum and Cinema on Nov. 7.Heritage founder Michael Johnson says that Belafonte, who will be in town next week for a gig at the Meyerhoff, will accept the award at an invitation-only brunch, then will put his hands and feet in some cement for the museum's walk of fame. Renovation efforts at the museum's site at 5 W. North Ave. are still under way. Johnson said the Heritage should be open by early 1999.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
Thanks to the Maryland Film Festival, it ought to get good and loud and even lyrical at Station North this Thursday through Sunday with a vital, eclectic slate of music-oriented movies. Alice Donut, for a quarter-century a bulwark of Baltimore's underground rock scene, rockets into above-ground view with "Freaks in Love. " "Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone" should set audiences bobbing to the punk-pop-rock-funk sounds of Los Angeles' favorite sextet. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director Marin Alsop will present "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" — with its galvanizing Ennio Morricone score — to dramatize the operatic glory of inspired movie music.
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By LORI SEARS | April 6, 2006
Harry Belafonte He's been a singer, actor, author and producer. And this weekend, Harry Belafonte will be in Bolton Hill and taking on the role he's most passionate about -- that of civil rights activist. Belafonte will appear at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church on Sunday and will speak on "Life, Race and Nonviolence" at a lecture open to the public. Belafonte will appear at 3 p.m. Sunday at the church, 1316 Park Ave. Tickets are $20 and will be available at the door. Proceeds will benefit the Brown Memorial tutoring program.
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By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
Harry Belafonte's speaking voice has always had a touch of hoarseness, but now, at 79, he sounds like an old New York cabbie who just completed a 10-K run -- uphill. His rasp is more amplified, and with every sentence, it appears he's about to run out of breath. Yet the legendary entertainer and civil rights activist, who is speaking Sunday at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church in Bolton Hill, scarcely has trouble being understood, particularly in recent years, when he has loudly opposed the war in Iraq and the Bush administration.
FEATURES
September 19, 2006
Symposium Harry Belafonte at Hopkins Tonight, the Johns Hopkins Uni versity's Milton S. Eisenhower Speakers Symposium continues with a presentation from singer, actor and activist Harry Bela fonte. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. for the event, which begins at 8 p.m. and takes place at Shriver Hall on the Homewood cam pus, 3400 N. Charles St. It's open to the public, but seating is limited. Reservations can be made by making a donation to the symposium. Information: visit www.jhu.edu/mse/reserve.
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By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1992
Yearning for a valentine from Harry Belafonte, Bill Cosby, Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor or Margaret Thatcher? A sweet sentiment perhaps from Erica Jong, Queen Latifah or the Minnesota Twins?They may not come in the mail, but valentines made or donated by these and other celebrities will be sold at auction this evening at a party to benefit Impact, an organization that provides recreational and educational programs for homeless children in shelters.The cocktail party and auction will be at the Puck Building in Manhattan.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 14, 1992
A rare appearance by Harry Belafonte will be the highlight of an unusually glittering Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pops lineup next season.Belafonte, who will appear without the BSO, is one of the truly legendary figures in American popular music: He was the first singer to sell more than 1 million copies of an individual album, he was the first African-American to win an Emmy, and he was also a Tony winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center award.Other...
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 25, 2002
WASHINGTON -- There's more than one sniper in the news these days. Calling Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice "house slaves" on President Bush's plantation has brought Harry Belafonte more publicity than he's had since his "The Banana Boat Song" roared up the charts in 1957. This time he did not sing, "Day-O!" But a lot of the rest of us say, "Oh, no!" As a liberal political activist, Mr. Belafonte has taken on many worthy causes over the years, but, alas, this time he missed the banana boat.
FEATURES
September 19, 2006
Symposium Harry Belafonte at Hopkins Tonight, the Johns Hopkins Uni versity's Milton S. Eisenhower Speakers Symposium continues with a presentation from singer, actor and activist Harry Bela fonte. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. for the event, which begins at 8 p.m. and takes place at Shriver Hall on the Homewood cam pus, 3400 N. Charles St. It's open to the public, but seating is limited. Reservations can be made by making a donation to the symposium. Information: visit www.jhu.edu/mse/reserve.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 8, 2006
The invitation to the independence day celebration of the "Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela" was addressed to George Kane. Yeah, that's me. George Kane, columnist. What the heck. I decided to go anyway. Who knows, I thought: I might meet someone interesting. Turns out I did. So, cleverly disguised as Sun columnist Gregory Kane, I slipped into the embassy about 7:30 Wednesday night. I was barely inside the door when I looked to my right. Who was standing there but my old pal, Harry Belafonte.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | April 6, 2006
Harry Belafonte He's been a singer, actor, author and producer. And this weekend, Harry Belafonte will be in Bolton Hill and taking on the role he's most passionate about -- that of civil rights activist. Belafonte will appear at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church on Sunday and will speak on "Life, Race and Nonviolence" at a lecture open to the public. Belafonte will appear at 3 p.m. Sunday at the church, 1316 Park Ave. Tickets are $20 and will be available at the door. Proceeds will benefit the Brown Memorial tutoring program.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
Harry Belafonte's speaking voice has always had a touch of hoarseness, but now, at 79, he sounds like an old New York cabbie who just completed a 10-K run -- uphill. His rasp is more amplified, and with every sentence, it appears he's about to run out of breath. Yet the legendary entertainer and civil rights activist, who is speaking Sunday at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church in Bolton Hill, scarcely has trouble being understood, particularly in recent years, when he has loudly opposed the war in Iraq and the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2003
Lethal Weapon movie actor Danny Glover spoke out against a possible war in Iraq yesterday, telling a Baltimore crowd gathered to celebrate the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. that the slain civil rights leader's dreams for peace are "being dismantled as we speak." Speaking to about 500 people at the Johns Hopkins medical campus, Glover was one of three speakers who used King's birthday as a chance to criticize the state of domestic and foreign affairs. "King's teachings and words resonate today like never before," Glover said after a spirited keynote address at Turner Auditorium to hospital staff, faculty and students, some clad in scrubs on their lunch hour.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2002
CHICAGO - Inside the 7,000-square-foot office of a renovated warehouse on south Michigan Avenue, it is almost as if the walls can talk. Boxes of labeled videotapes neatly line shelves where the tales of a century and a people are stored. Some of the stories are familiar, some not so familiar. And some of those telling their stories are famous - Harry Belafonte, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Terry McMillan and Julian Bond - though many are not so famous. But all are deemed to be history makers, their voices and faces captured on tape as lessons for generations to come.
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By Karin Remesch | March 21, 1996
Harry BelafonteDay-O! Day-O! Daylight come and you wanna go hear Harry Belafonte? Listen to some of your favorite island songs when the singer, actor and activist performs in the Super Pops Series at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall at 8: 15 p.m. today through Saturday and 3: 30 p.m. Sunday. The program will include such hits as "Skin to Skin," "Jamaica Farewell," "Banana Boat" and "Matilda." Tickets are priced from $25 to $43. Call (410) 783-8000. The Amazing Marlo can produce a single flower from thin air and, with a hand quicker than the eye, change it into a huge bouquet.
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By Randi Kest | November 5, 1998
Get 'Goosebumps'Everyone will get goosebumps when R.L. Stine's frightening children's books come to life at "Goosebumps Live on Stage!" starting tomorrow. "Goosebumps" is making a 12-show appearance at the Mechanic Theatre, 25 Hopkins Plaza, as part of its two-year U.S. tour. Ticket prices range from $14 to $29. Shows are tomorrow at 7 p.m., Saturday and Nov. 14 at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., Sunday at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Tuesday through Nov. 13 at 7 p.m., and Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. Call 410-752-1200.'Angels' at the Walters"The Invisible Made Visible: Angels from the Vatican," a touring exhibit of angel art from the ninth century B.C. to this century, will be on exhibit Sunday through Jan. 3 at the Walters Art Gallery, 600 N. Charles St. Paintings, sculptures, liturgical vessels and vestments and tapestries from the Vatican Museums, by such artists as Raphael, Reni, Georges Rouault and Salvador Dali, will be on display Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (until 8 p.m. Thursdays and on Nov. 27 and 28, Dec. 26 and Jan. 2)
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 25, 2002
WASHINGTON -- There's more than one sniper in the news these days. Calling Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice "house slaves" on President Bush's plantation has brought Harry Belafonte more publicity than he's had since his "The Banana Boat Song" roared up the charts in 1957. This time he did not sing, "Day-O!" But a lot of the rest of us say, "Oh, no!" As a liberal political activist, Mr. Belafonte has taken on many worthy causes over the years, but, alas, this time he missed the banana boat.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 23, 2002
SO IN THE blink of an eye, the mouths of black America's liberal leadership have clamped shut tighter than the doors on Mumia Abu-Jamal's cell on death row. For a while there, we couldn't seem to shut them up. We had the Revvums Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton getting offended and criticizing jokes disparaging Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks in the movie Barbershop. Then we had Harry Belafonte -- a left-wing activist as well as a singer and actor -- dismissing Secretary of State Colin Powell as President Bush's house slave.
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