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Harry And Jeanette

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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 26, 2006
Nathan Weinberg, a retired trustee and vice president of a large charitable foundation, and a former transit executive, died of pneumonia yesterday at Sinai Hospital. He was 89 and lived in Pikesville. The son of immigrants from the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, Mr. Weinberg was born in Baltimore. One of seven children, he grew up in a home without indoor plumbing, according to his eldest son, Donn A. Weinberg of Owings Mills. "It is the typical immigrant story," said Donn Weinberg, who replaced his father as vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation upon his father's retirement in 2002.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
An aging transportation building and garage in Baltimore has been restored into the $8 million Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Housing and Resource Center, adding to the growing complex of services for the homeless along the Fallsway. The 24-hour facility will provide temporary housing and services to the city's homeless population, which officials believe may exceed 4,000 on any given night. "This is the culmination of one of our goals in our 10-year plan to end homelessness," said Kate Briddell, director of the city's homeless services program.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
Baltimore is becoming the town that Harry and Jeanette Weinberg built -- or, at least, a town covered with their names. Mercy Medical Center boasts a new Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center to house its women's health and medicine program. In Waverly, a Harry and Jeanette Weinberg YMCA is to open next year. The Living Classrooms Foundation, which operates from a Weinberg center, is getting a new Weinberg pavilion. Buildings at almost all major medical institutions in the city and Baltimore County bear the Weinberg name, from a cancer center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, to a planned behavioral health center at Kennedy Krieger Institute, to the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Cancer Institute at Franklin Square Hospital Center.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announced this week that it will award $10 million over five years for emergency services for impoverished Holocaust survivors living in North America. The Weinberg Holocaust Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund provides medical equipment and medications, dental care, transportation, food and short-term home care for Holocaust survivors. The money from the Baltimore-based foundation will be managed by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, based in New York.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | January 13, 1992
Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital dedicated a new building yesterday to Harry Weinberg, a reclusive Baltimore real estate tycoon who died in November 1990 leaving $743 million in a charitable foundation.The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation's gift of $1.5 million will retire the debt of the new $15 million building off Northern Parkway. The building houses a community room, a room for spiritual reflection and a lobby.The foundation, criticized by charitable organizations for its unconventional approach to giving, is Baltimore's largest philanthropy.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Beulah Horton thinks she's moved to heaven, and she might as well have.From her old apartment on a seedy block of Reservoir Hill that she called "drug city," the retired nurse's assistant just moved to a state-of-the-art home for senior citizens in the restored 19th-century Gallagher Mansion off York Road in North Baltimore.The long-decayed mansion, for decades a historic white elephant that no one could seem to rebuild, has been restored by a partnership of North Baltimore churches and community groups with $3.4 million in private and government grants.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- The gate to the playground built by more than 2,000 volunteers at Stadium Place, next to the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg YMCA in Waverly, has been padlocked on occasion in the mornings, even though it is supposed to open daily at 8 a.m. THE BACKSTORY -- The 14,000-square-foot playground at the site of the old Memorial Stadium on East 33rd Street cost about $400,000. The money was donated by private businesses and corporations. The YMCA is responsible for maintaining the playground.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
A long-awaited plan to rebuild downtown's west side and the blighted Howard Street shopping district recommends the areas be infused with new middle-class housing units, shops, offices and cultural and hospitality-related uses.To be unveiled today by a partnership of city officials, private foundations and property owners, the West Side Task Force's study is aimed at improving the character of a large district that is underused and marked by vacant buildings and small retail operations.The study calls for the reopening of Lexington Street to vehicles from Liberty Street to Eutaw Street -- a stretch that was made into an urban mall in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2003
The state cleared the way yesterday for one of Anne Arundel County's fastest-developing areas to welcome a 232-acre public park with nearly 7,000 feet of shoreline, varied habitats and groves of forestland. Despite a tight budget, the Board of Public Works approved spending $1.5 million from Program Open Space to acquire an area known as White Pond Park, off Fort Smallwood Road and abutting the Patapsco River and several creeks. The area will be renamed Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Park, after the Baltimore foundation that donated its interest in the property - valued at about $2.75 million - to make acquisition of the three parcels possible.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Laura Lippman and David Michael Ettlin and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writers | April 29, 1994
William Weinberg, a Baltimore real estate developer who was one of five trustees of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, died Wednesday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 82.A quiet man who taught his children the importance of giving, Mr. Weinberg did not seek publicity about his philanthropy.But when his billionaire brother, Harry, died in 1990 and left most of his estate to the charitable foundation -- one of the nation's largest -- William Weinberg became well known as one of its trustees.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- The gate to the playground built by more than 2,000 volunteers at Stadium Place, next to the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg YMCA in Waverly, has been padlocked on occasion in the mornings, even though it is supposed to open daily at 8 a.m. THE BACKSTORY -- The 14,000-square-foot playground at the site of the old Memorial Stadium on East 33rd Street cost about $400,000. The money was donated by private businesses and corporations. The YMCA is responsible for maintaining the playground.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 26, 2006
Nathan Weinberg, a retired trustee and vice president of a large charitable foundation, and a former transit executive, died of pneumonia yesterday at Sinai Hospital. He was 89 and lived in Pikesville. The son of immigrants from the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, Mr. Weinberg was born in Baltimore. One of seven children, he grew up in a home without indoor plumbing, according to his eldest son, Donn A. Weinberg of Owings Mills. "It is the typical immigrant story," said Donn Weinberg, who replaced his father as vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation upon his father's retirement in 2002.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2003
The state cleared the way yesterday for one of Anne Arundel County's fastest-developing areas to welcome a 232-acre public park with nearly 7,000 feet of shoreline, varied habitats and groves of forestland. Despite a tight budget, the Board of Public Works approved spending $1.5 million from Program Open Space to acquire an area known as White Pond Park, off Fort Smallwood Road and abutting the Patapsco River and several creeks. The area will be renamed Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Park, after the Baltimore foundation that donated its interest in the property - valued at about $2.75 million - to make acquisition of the three parcels possible.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
Baltimore is becoming the town that Harry and Jeanette Weinberg built -- or, at least, a town covered with their names. Mercy Medical Center boasts a new Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center to house its women's health and medicine program. In Waverly, a Harry and Jeanette Weinberg YMCA is to open next year. The Living Classrooms Foundation, which operates from a Weinberg center, is getting a new Weinberg pavilion. Buildings at almost all major medical institutions in the city and Baltimore County bear the Weinberg name, from a cancer center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, to a planned behavioral health center at Kennedy Krieger Institute, to the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Cancer Institute at Franklin Square Hospital Center.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
A long-awaited plan to rebuild downtown's west side and the blighted Howard Street shopping district recommends the areas be infused with new middle-class housing units, shops, offices and cultural and hospitality-related uses.To be unveiled today by a partnership of city officials, private foundations and property owners, the West Side Task Force's study is aimed at improving the character of a large district that is underused and marked by vacant buildings and small retail operations.The study calls for the reopening of Lexington Street to vehicles from Liberty Street to Eutaw Street -- a stretch that was made into an urban mall in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Beulah Horton thinks she's moved to heaven, and she might as well have.From her old apartment on a seedy block of Reservoir Hill that she called "drug city," the retired nurse's assistant just moved to a state-of-the-art home for senior citizens in the restored 19th-century Gallagher Mansion off York Road in North Baltimore.The long-decayed mansion, for decades a historic white elephant that no one could seem to rebuild, has been restored by a partnership of North Baltimore churches and community groups with $3.4 million in private and government grants.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
BALTIMORE will soon be the home of a $2.25 million history and education center that has been touted as the nation's"largest and most advanced facility for the study, understanding and appreciation of regional American Jewish history."The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has set May 5 as the groundbreaking for the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a 12,000-square-foot expansion of its three-building campus at 15 Lloyd St. near Lombard Street. When complete in late 1997, the brick-and-stone building will contain a 2,000-square-foot exhibition gallery, expanded library, visitor orientation center, museum shop, entrance court, staff offices and more than 4,000 square feet of new storage and processing space for the growing collection of documents and photographs.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | September 23, 1993
Catholics seeking changes in church will hold seminarMaryland Roman Catholics seeking changes in their church and more open discussion of problems they say are not being addressed by leaders of the Archdiocese of Baltimore have planned the second in a series of public programs for Oct. 9.The Rev. Michael H. Crosby, a Capuchin Franciscan priest, theologian and author from Milwaukee, will address the seminar and lead the discussion from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
BALTIMORE will soon be the home of a $2.25 million history and education center that has been touted as the nation's"largest and most advanced facility for the study, understanding and appreciation of regional American Jewish history."The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has set May 5 as the groundbreaking for the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a 12,000-square-foot expansion of its three-building campus at 15 Lloyd St. near Lombard Street. When complete in late 1997, the brick-and-stone building will contain a 2,000-square-foot exhibition gallery, expanded library, visitor orientation center, museum shop, entrance court, staff offices and more than 4,000 square feet of new storage and processing space for the growing collection of documents and photographs.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Laura Lippman and David Michael Ettlin and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writers | April 29, 1994
William Weinberg, a Baltimore real estate developer who was one of five trustees of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, died Wednesday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 82.A quiet man who taught his children the importance of giving, Mr. Weinberg did not seek publicity about his philanthropy.But when his billionaire brother, Harry, died in 1990 and left most of his estate to the charitable foundation -- one of the nation's largest -- William Weinberg became well known as one of its trustees.
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