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Harriss

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NEWS
May 3, 2003
The United daughters of the Confederacy Baltimore Chapter #8, deeply regrets the loss of their dear member, MARGERY W. HARRISS, past PresidentMELINDA MORGAN, Treasurer
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NEWS
By Sarah Fisher and Sarah Fisher,sarah.fisher@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
The somber atmosphere of Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church could not dampen Ashland Croxton Jr.'s enthusiasm as he described his nephew Darryl Croxton, who died a month ago. The soft-spoken man of 78 spoke of his nephew's ability to touch an audience through his acting. "If he was sitting here right now in that pulpit and reading the Creation story," Ashland Croxton Jr. said, laughing, "I guarantee you he'd have you in tears." Three weeks ago, Darryl Winslow Croxton, a local actor and poet, was found dead in his Mount Vernon apartment, apparently of heart disease.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Margery W. Harriss, a retired, much-revered Baltimore public school English teacher and vice principal, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Guilford resident was 93. After retiring from the city's public school system in 1973, she directed the office of special events at Loyola College, where she received the President's Medal in 1985. She was born Margery Willis and raised near Hollins Market in Southwest Baltimore. After graduating with honors from Forest Park High School in 1925, she attended the State Normal School in Towson - now Towson University - from which she earned her teacher's certificate and a bachelor's degree in education.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 1, 2007
Coming to the Maryland Historical Society on Sept. 15 is The Artist: A Drama Without Words, the world premiere of an opera written by H.L. Mencken, with music by Ludwig van Beethoven and Louis Cheslock. So, you didn't know that the Sage of Baltimore wrote an opera. Well, kind of. It began life as an experimental play written by Mencken in 1912. Four years later, it became the Vagabond Players' first production. The play, called "a drama without words," consists of the unspoken thoughts of a visiting German pianist and those of his audience and critics during a recital.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
She has said it before, but this year, Joan Griffith says she means it: This really is the best offering of books she has seen. There's the lifetime collection of one man who belonged to several fiction and mystery book clubs in the 1930s and 1940s. There's an unusually voluminous selection of tomes from three men who apparently taught - and exhaustively read - history. And there are about 1,000 books from the personal library of noted Baltimore author, critic and newspaperman R.P. Harriss, including a trove of inscribed volumes.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1995
Rejection may have helped put one of Clarinda Harriss' first published poems, "For My Father," in the prestigious Prairie Schooner.The poem had been turned down by several lesser publications, she remembers. "And someone told me to send it to Prairie Schooner. I did. But I accidentally left the rejection slips in the envelope when I sent it out. Well, the editor accepted the poem but returned the rejections, saying, 'I can tell we have better taste than those people.' "Since then, Ms. Harriss -- poet, editor, associate professor of English at Towson State University and acting chair of the English department -- has had more than 350 poems published, as well as five books and hundreds of newspaper articles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
Our happy days at Eastern are quickly passing by We found success and happiness and they will never die We had time for play and friendship and for all our studies, too. You'll always be remembered by the Class of '52. - song from the 1952 yearbook of Eastern High School Sometimes gratitude builds slowly over the years. Half a century has passed since Eastern High School's Class of 1952 graduated into the dawning of Eisenhower's America. The students were all female - so were the teachers they left behind.
NEWS
By Sarah Fisher and Sarah Fisher,sarah.fisher@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
The somber atmosphere of Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church could not dampen Ashland Croxton Jr.'s enthusiasm as he described his nephew Darryl Croxton, who died a month ago. The soft-spoken man of 78 spoke of his nephew's ability to touch an audience through his acting. "If he was sitting here right now in that pulpit and reading the Creation story," Ashland Croxton Jr. said, laughing, "I guarantee you he'd have you in tears." Three weeks ago, Darryl Winslow Croxton, a local actor and poet, was found dead in his Mount Vernon apartment, apparently of heart disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Adrienne Saunders and Adrienne Saunders,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2003
Miracles are the stuff of holiday legend. So staging a Shakespearean tragedy to open the day after Christmas might seem tragic to holiday cheer. But for director and producer Darryl Croxton, the timing was exactly right for King Lear. The date marks the 397th anniversary of its first documented production, on Dec. 26, 1606, at court for James I of England. Tomorrow night -- with actors in modern dress, against a black backdrop and in an Episcopal church -- the tragedy will serve as the inaugural production of Croxton's new theater company, Theatre of the Rising Sun. Croxton, a Mount Vernon resident who grew up primarily in Forest Park, formed the company in April hoping to imbue the local theater community with his lifelong love of Shakespeare's work.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | October 6, 2006
Zachary Harriss had a kidney transplant when he was 2 years old. With his seventh birthday approaching on Monday, he has two things to celebrate: life and a winning entry in the American Kidney Fund's art contest. Next weekend, the fund will fete Zachary of Glen Burnie, Iesha Wyatt of Baltimore and 11 other children and their families with a tour of Washington, including a stop at the White House, and two celebratory dinners. The winning artwork will be used to illustrate the fund's 2007 "Kid"ney Calendar, which is distributed as a thank-you gift to donors and sold for $6. As many as 100,000 people will see Zachary's drawing for June, a portrait of him and another young transplant patient playing outside among flowers and butterflies.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | October 6, 2006
Zachary Harriss had a kidney transplant when he was 2 years old. With his seventh birthday approaching on Monday, he has two things to celebrate: life and a winning entry in the American Kidney Fund's art contest. Next weekend, the fund will fete Zachary of Glen Burnie, Iesha Wyatt of Baltimore and 11 other children and their families with a tour of Washington, including a stop at the White House, and two celebratory dinners. The winning artwork will be used to illustrate the fund's 2007 "Kid"ney Calendar, which is distributed as a thank-you gift to donors and sold for $6. As many as 100,000 people will see Zachary's drawing for June, a portrait of him and another young transplant patient playing outside among flowers and butterflies.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
She has said it before, but this year, Joan Griffith says she means it: This really is the best offering of books she has seen. There's the lifetime collection of one man who belonged to several fiction and mystery book clubs in the 1930s and 1940s. There's an unusually voluminous selection of tomes from three men who apparently taught - and exhaustively read - history. And there are about 1,000 books from the personal library of noted Baltimore author, critic and newspaperman R.P. Harriss, including a trove of inscribed volumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Adrienne Saunders and Adrienne Saunders,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2003
Miracles are the stuff of holiday legend. So staging a Shakespearean tragedy to open the day after Christmas might seem tragic to holiday cheer. But for director and producer Darryl Croxton, the timing was exactly right for King Lear. The date marks the 397th anniversary of its first documented production, on Dec. 26, 1606, at court for James I of England. Tomorrow night -- with actors in modern dress, against a black backdrop and in an Episcopal church -- the tragedy will serve as the inaugural production of Croxton's new theater company, Theatre of the Rising Sun. Croxton, a Mount Vernon resident who grew up primarily in Forest Park, formed the company in April hoping to imbue the local theater community with his lifelong love of Shakespeare's work.
NEWS
May 3, 2003
The United daughters of the Confederacy Baltimore Chapter #8, deeply regrets the loss of their dear member, MARGERY W. HARRISS, past PresidentMELINDA MORGAN, Treasurer
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Margery W. Harriss, a retired, much-revered Baltimore public school English teacher and vice principal, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Guilford resident was 93. After retiring from the city's public school system in 1973, she directed the office of special events at Loyola College, where she received the President's Medal in 1985. She was born Margery Willis and raised near Hollins Market in Southwest Baltimore. After graduating with honors from Forest Park High School in 1925, she attended the State Normal School in Towson - now Towson University - from which she earned her teacher's certificate and a bachelor's degree in education.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
Our happy days at Eastern are quickly passing by We found success and happiness and they will never die We had time for play and friendship and for all our studies, too. You'll always be remembered by the Class of '52. - song from the 1952 yearbook of Eastern High School Sometimes gratitude builds slowly over the years. Half a century has passed since Eastern High School's Class of 1952 graduated into the dawning of Eisenhower's America. The students were all female - so were the teachers they left behind.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 1, 2007
Coming to the Maryland Historical Society on Sept. 15 is The Artist: A Drama Without Words, the world premiere of an opera written by H.L. Mencken, with music by Ludwig van Beethoven and Louis Cheslock. So, you didn't know that the Sage of Baltimore wrote an opera. Well, kind of. It began life as an experimental play written by Mencken in 1912. Four years later, it became the Vagabond Players' first production. The play, called "a drama without words," consists of the unspoken thoughts of a visiting German pianist and those of his audience and critics during a recital.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1995
Rejection may have helped put one of Clarinda Harriss' first published poems, "For My Father," in the prestigious Prairie Schooner.The poem had been turned down by several lesser publications, she remembers. "And someone told me to send it to Prairie Schooner. I did. But I accidentally left the rejection slips in the envelope when I sent it out. Well, the editor accepted the poem but returned the rejections, saying, 'I can tell we have better taste than those people.' "Since then, Ms. Harriss -- poet, editor, associate professor of English at Towson State University and acting chair of the English department -- has had more than 350 poems published, as well as five books and hundreds of newspaper articles.
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