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By JOHN ANDERSON and JOHN ANDERSON,NEWSDAY | February 10, 2006
Los Angeles-- --Everyone wants to be Cary Grant," an actor named Cary Grant once said. "Even I want to be Cary Grant." Does anyone want to be Harrison Ford? You'd think. The 36 movies he's made since 1967 have grossed more than $3 billion. He's starred in some of the most popular films of all time (Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark), received an Academy Award nomination (Witness) and several for Golden Globes (Sabrina, The Fugitive, The Mosquito Coast). He was named Box Office Star of the Century by America movie theater owners at the 1994 Sho-West convention.
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July 4, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow or Chris Kaltenbach, unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Get Smart: Steve Carell's knack for sneaking humanity into broad comedy is all wrong for Maxwell Smart, the blundering yet incredible, lucky agent for the super-secret government spy agency CONTROL. In a misguided equivalent to a comic-book "origin story," the movie portrays Smart's entrance into the world of field agents as a revenge of the nerds. (He even has a couple of lovable funky-geeky sidekicks.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
One more time, father knows best - or at least hits the hardest, especially with the pitcher end of a blender - in the fast and furious Firewall. As Jack Stanfield, Harrison Ford again gets to reveal the mettle behind a white-collar professional and devoted husband, as he did in The Fugitive and Air Force One and his Tom Clancy adventures a decade ago. Ford's latest embattled good guy, a computer security V.P. for a Seattle-based bank, displays as...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 22, 2008
Look into the eyes of the Crystal Skull and you learn the secrets of the universe. Look into the eyes of Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones and you learn the secret of star power. When Soviet super-agent Irina Splanko (Cate Blanchett) forces the dashing archaeologist to lock orbs with her unholy treasure, the irresistible force of the Skull meets the impenetrable object of Indy's brain. Ford brings off this close encounter with the unflappable humor and strength he has brought to each episode of this cheerfully outlandish series.
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By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1991
IN MOST cases, the name of a famous movie star can generate a frenzy of activity from the buzzing of gossip to the swarming of adoring fans.Harrison Ford, star of the "Indiana Jones" action-adventure trilogy, has the name recognition that would generate that type of frenzy.But appearances can be deceiving, especially in Annapolis.Ford has been in Annapolis since last Friday, filming scenes for the movie "Patriot Games," yet there has been little talk, little interest in the star.Based on the Tom Clancy novel, the movie is about a former Marine who foils an attempt by the Irish Republican Army to kidnap Prince Charles, Princess Diana and Prince William.
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,Contributing Writer | August 7, 1993
Forget those arduous years of film school, those hours poring over terms like "mise en scene" and "cinema verite." Let Harrison Ford clear up the secrets of moviemaking for you."They used to have this thing that they called 'telephone logic' that they were teaching people at MGM. Mike Nichols told me this," Mr. Ford said in a recent interview. "If you're going to the telephone, and you're going to get bad news, go with a smile on your face, otherwise they're not gonna know when you get bad news.
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By Craig Timberg | July 26, 1991
They've been bashed with bats, shot in the head, crushed in cars. And they've spent months, sometimes years, recovering from the peculiarly debilitating effects of brain injuries.Eighteen outpatients at Sinai Hospital's Return! program for victims of brain trauma took a trip yesterday to the Senator movie theater for a special showing of "Regarding Henry," the slick Hollywood simulation of a struggle they know much too well.In the movie Henry, a heartless father, adulterous husband and unscrupulous lawyer (played by Harrison Ford)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 15, 1995
The lost treasure of American movies is charm. No one can define it, no one can capture it if it isn't there to be captured, but you either have it or you don't, and fewer and fewer American movies do. And as the largely charmless "Sabrina" plays out, it becomes clear that Greg Kinnear has it and Harrison Ford does not.For Ford, the news isn't necessary catastrophic. This stern gentleman has made and will continue to make a healthy living as a graceful action star; a convincing dramatic heavyweight; even, if the occasion demands, a clown.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
The elaborate chase at the climax of Hollywood Homicide rouses both belly laughs and goose bumps. It's like Bullitt and The French Connection transplanted to Hollywood Boulevard and crossed with everything from Blue Thunder to The Bicycle Thief. It's the ideal capper for a cop comedy with a refreshingly wry, adult and humane attitude. The director, Ron Shelton (Bull Durham, Tin Cup), and his star, Harrison Ford, prove that all you need to revitalize shootouts, interrogation and forensics - the narrative paraphernalia played for tired chills and bad jokes on most TV police shows - is the talent (and willingness)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 22, 2008
Look into the eyes of the Crystal Skull and you learn the secrets of the universe. Look into the eyes of Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones and you learn the secret of star power. When Soviet super-agent Irina Splanko (Cate Blanchett) forces the dashing archaeologist to lock orbs with her unholy treasure, the irresistible force of the Skull meets the impenetrable object of Indy's brain. Ford brings off this close encounter with the unflappable humor and strength he has brought to each episode of this cheerfully outlandish series.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
An actor is always waiting for his big break, that one TV or movie role that puts him in the public eye to stay. For Maryland native Peter Douglas, 29, that break could come via a medium that didn't even exist 10 years ago. Douglas, who lived in the Montgomery County community of Potomac through high school, co-stars in Ghost Whisperer: The Other Side II, a companion to the CBS TV series The Ghost Whisperer that only can be viewed online. He plays Luke, a mysterious, brooding "spirit collector" prowling the street of a kind of purgatory, selling recently deceased Zach (Mark Hapka)
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By JOHN ANDERSON and JOHN ANDERSON,NEWSDAY | February 10, 2006
Los Angeles-- --Everyone wants to be Cary Grant," an actor named Cary Grant once said. "Even I want to be Cary Grant." Does anyone want to be Harrison Ford? You'd think. The 36 movies he's made since 1967 have grossed more than $3 billion. He's starred in some of the most popular films of all time (Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark), received an Academy Award nomination (Witness) and several for Golden Globes (Sabrina, The Fugitive, The Mosquito Coast). He was named Box Office Star of the Century by America movie theater owners at the 1994 Sho-West convention.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
One more time, father knows best - or at least hits the hardest, especially with the pitcher end of a blender - in the fast and furious Firewall. As Jack Stanfield, Harrison Ford again gets to reveal the mettle behind a white-collar professional and devoted husband, as he did in The Fugitive and Air Force One and his Tom Clancy adventures a decade ago. Ford's latest embattled good guy, a computer security V.P. for a Seattle-based bank, displays as...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
The elaborate chase at the climax of Hollywood Homicide rouses both belly laughs and goose bumps. It's like Bullitt and The French Connection transplanted to Hollywood Boulevard and crossed with everything from Blue Thunder to The Bicycle Thief. It's the ideal capper for a cop comedy with a refreshingly wry, adult and humane attitude. The director, Ron Shelton (Bull Durham, Tin Cup), and his star, Harrison Ford, prove that all you need to revitalize shootouts, interrogation and forensics - the narrative paraphernalia played for tired chills and bad jokes on most TV police shows - is the talent (and willingness)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
It's only a movie ... Repeat this to yourself in those final, innocent milliseconds before 69,000 Baltimore football fans are vaporized in their seats - along with the stadium itself and pretty much everything else for a quarter-mile around. It's only a movie. It's only ... Repeat it as the nuclear blast wave ripples out from the stadium, leaving the heart of Baltimore in shreds and its survivors burned, irradiated and bewildered. The Sum of All Fears - the prescient 1991 Tom Clancy novel about terrorists who strike a monstrous blow against the heart of an American city - is now a movie, opening Friday.
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By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 2000
HOLLYWOOD -- It is the most exclusive of all clubs, though its annual black-tie meeting is broadcast around the world to an audience of nearly a billion people. It has no official membership requirements, but the informal necessities include consummate talent, an impressive body of work, good manners and respect of your peers. Some would say it also helps if you're British, can do accents, suffer tragically and are willing to attend a lot of banquets and talk shows. Welcome to Hollywood's most prestigious fraternity: the Oscar Club.
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By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | September 16, 1998
Couch potatoes need no longer wait for the commercials.A new VCR-like device will let TV watchers literally stop time: Replay Networks is rushing to shelves in November a black box that lets TV watchers pause live television.The 15-employee, 1-year-old Silicon Alley upstart is betting that its $999 Replay TV controller box will appeal to a broad base of TV addicts."People want more control over their TV-watching experience," said Jim Plant, Replay's marketing director.The box houses a 7-gigabyte hard-disc drive that starts recording when users hit the pause button on a special remote control.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
"The Fugitive" wouldn't have been nearly as good a movie if it had concentrated on the pursuer rather than the pursued.That's the problem with "U.S. Marshals," which brings back Tommy Lee Jones as the coldly efficient Sam Gerard. Five years ago, he was tracking Harrison Ford as a doctor wrongly accused of murdering his wife. Today, he's tracking Wesley Snipes as a former marine accused -- it takes a while to find out if rightly or wrongly -- of murdering three federal agents."The Fugitive" was a great film, as much because of the dynamic between Jones and Ford as for the incredible stunts and special effects.
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By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | September 16, 1998
Couch potatoes need no longer wait for the commercials.A new VCR-like device will let TV watchers literally stop time: Replay Networks is rushing to shelves in November a black box that lets TV watchers pause live television.The 15-employee, 1-year-old Silicon Alley upstart is betting that its $999 Replay TV controller box will appeal to a broad base of TV addicts."People want more control over their TV-watching experience," said Jim Plant, Replay's marketing director.The box houses a 7-gigabyte hard-disc drive that starts recording when users hit the pause button on a special remote control.
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