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Harris Wofford

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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Harris L. Wofford, 65, a Kennedy administration veteran and former college president, was appointed by Democratic Gov. Robert P. Casey yesterday to temporarily fill the Senate seat of the late Pennsylvania Republican John Heinz.The selection, announced at a Harrisburg news conference, gives the Democrats a 57-43 Senate majority, their largest advantage since1980.But analysts in both parties said that Mr. Wofford, who is untested as a campaigner, could find it extremely tough to hold the seat, particularly if Attorney General Richard L. Thornburgh succumbs to pressure from national and state Republican leaders and becomes the GOP candidate in the Nov. 5 special election to fill the final two years of the Heinz term.
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NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 3, 1994
THE RALLY was winding down in Philadelphia's medieval city hall courtyard at 1:15 p.m. when a Secret Service agent whispered the words agents dread to hear."
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NEWS
October 15, 1991
Forty-one GOP senators support Clarence Thomas' confirmation for the Supreme Court. Only two, Sens. James Jeffords of Vermont and Bob Packwood of Oregon, have said they will not support him.These Democrats support Thomas: Sens. Sam Nunn and Wyche Fowler of Georgia, J. Bennett Johnston and John Breaux of Louisiana, Harry Reid and Richard Bryan of Nevada; Ernest F. Hollings of South Carolina, Dennis DeConcini of Arizona, Alan J. Dixon of Illinois, David Boren of Oklahoma, and Richard Shelby of Alabama.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Sun Staff Writer | November 1, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- President Clinton, flush from foreign policy successes and rising in the opinion polls, began a weeklong campaign swing yesterday that he hopes will push threatened Democratic candidates over the top to victory in the midterm elections."
NEWS
By CHRIS MATTHEWS | September 29, 1994
Washington. -- Three years ago, a senator from Pennsylvania was killed in an airplane crash. Harris Wofford, the Democrat chosen to fill his seat, faced an instant threat. His Republican rival, former governor Dick Thornburgh, was 40 points ahead in the polls. To turn things around, the Wofford-for-Senate campaign needed a powerhouse campaign issue.It picked health care.At first, the choice seemed an odd one. Here was a blue-collar state full of small coal, steel and farming towns hurting from recession.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover and Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Sen. Harris Wofford's election to a full term from Pennsylvania over former GOP Gov. Richard Thornburgh is a clear indication to his party's 1992 presidential candidates that they are on the right track in hammering President Bush as a Washington insider who neglects the economy and unmet domestic needs.Wofford's success in painting his GOP opponent as just such an insider based on his three years as attorney general in the Reagan and Bush administrations, and his strenuous advocacy of national health insurance for Americans, gave the Senate race a national character that probably will be part of a blueprint for the Democrats' challenge to Bush next year.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 10, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- Ray Ross recently broke a thumb playing basketball and ended up owing $3,128.30 to his health insurer, which refused to pay the full bill of $9,776.30.Connie Wells and her husband spent their life savings -- and then sold the family farm to qualify for Medicaid -- because of three young children with severe illnesses.Similar tales were abundant yesterday at a Senate hearing on the need to reform the nation's health care system.The experiences of Ross and the Wellses -- and others -- were not lost on Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell, D-Maine, and three other Democratic senators who kicked off a week-long series of public hearings here that will reach four other cities.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | November 7, 1991
Washington -- Six days after the government announced that by late summer one in ten Americans -- a record -- was on food stamps, Pennsylvanians emphatically declined to make Richard Thornburgh, formerly (among other things) head of President Bush's Domestic Policy Council, one of their senators.On election day, before Mr. Bush suddenly discovered that his trip to Asia was not, after all, urgent, he grumpily complained -- are you ready for this? -- that Harris Wofford had used negative ads. Mr. Bush did not blush.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 4, 1991
UPPER DARBY, Pa. -- Former Gov. and U.S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh, addressing attentive senior citizens the other day, trotted out a 14-point plan for "affordable health care" that he promised to seek if elected next Tuesday to the U.S. Senate. Thornburgh blasted what he called "the one-size-fits-all nationalized system" proposed by his Democratic opponent, Sen. Harris Wofford. Thornburgh said he had laid out his "principles for a national affordable health care strategy over a month ago" but was now spelling them out less than a week before the election.
NEWS
November 7, 1991
If politics could be measured on a Richter scale, the election of Harris Wofford to the U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania on Tuesday would register a 10.Make no mistake that the earth-movement was felt all the way to the lawn of the White House. President Bush knew what was to come when he hurriedly announced on Tuesday afternoon, before the Pennsylvania polls had closed, that he was canceling his long-scheduled trip to Asia and Australia. Having read the exit polls, the president knew for all his spectacular success as a world-class leader, middle America was fed up with his standing in the receiving line for foreign dignitaries while one in 10 Americans was standing in the receiving line for food stamps.
NEWS
By CHRIS MATTHEWS | September 29, 1994
Washington. -- Three years ago, a senator from Pennsylvania was killed in an airplane crash. Harris Wofford, the Democrat chosen to fill his seat, faced an instant threat. His Republican rival, former governor Dick Thornburgh, was 40 points ahead in the polls. To turn things around, the Wofford-for-Senate campaign needed a powerhouse campaign issue.It picked health care.At first, the choice seemed an odd one. Here was a blue-collar state full of small coal, steel and farming towns hurting from recession.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
Last in an occasional series on the Pennsylvania campaign.PHILADELPHIA -- If there has been a single killer television commercial run anywhere this year, it is the one Sen. Arlen Specter is using here against Democratic challenger Lynn Yeakel.It shows a news clip of a "waffle breakfast" sponsored by Ms. Yeakel at which she is asked to specify an issue on which Mr. Specter has waffled.Looking stricken, Ms. Yeakel is shown saying: "I think, let's see. Hang on a minute, let me think about it. Do you mind?
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 10, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- Ray Ross recently broke a thumb playing basketball and ended up owing $3,128.30 to his health insurer, which refused to pay the full bill of $9,776.30.Connie Wells and her husband spent their life savings -- and then sold the family farm to qualify for Medicaid -- because of three young children with severe illnesses.Similar tales were abundant yesterday at a Senate hearing on the need to reform the nation's health care system.The experiences of Ross and the Wellses -- and others -- were not lost on Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell, D-Maine, and three other Democratic senators who kicked off a week-long series of public hearings here that will reach four other cities.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 13, 1991
WHILE Sen. Harris Wofford was roaring to victory in Pennsylvania, fueled by middle-class worries over health insurance, Secretary of Health and Human Services Louis Sullivan was presiding over a summit conference of the health-care establishment. Consumer groups were excluded from the session of leaders of big insurance companies, doctors' organizations and hospital executives.Sullivan emerged from this session with the perfect symbol of the administration's vacuous health policy -- a proposed universal health-care credit card with only one flaw: It doesn't provide any health coverage.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 12, 1991
The lady on Battery Avenue says she has taken enough. The burglars came twice, and once they left her dog collapsed in the yard, and now the city will get meaner than ever as the cops and the schools and the firefighters tighten their belts.The lady on Battery Avenue says she wants some place safer. The cops who work South Baltimore say they know the creeps who broke into her house, but knowing it and proving it are two different things. They say this as they rush off to solve some other, more pressing crisis of the moment.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 8, 1991
JAMES CARVILLE went to bed drunk and woke up a genius.The raffish strategist of Harris Wofford's stunning 10-point victory over Dick Thornburgh in the U.S. Senate race -- the Political Earthquake of 1991 -- deserved a one-night blast.Carville, an offbeat, workaholic rogue, not only invented the Wofford campaign that dazzled Pennsylvanians and struck fear in George Bush's heart. Following his dictum -- "never mess with fate" -- Carville had even worn the same underwear the last 10 campaign days.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 13, 1991
WHILE Sen. Harris Wofford was roaring to victory in Pennsylvania, fueled by middle-class worries over health insurance, Secretary of Health and Human Services Louis Sullivan was presiding over a summit conference of the health-care establishment. Consumer groups were excluded from the session of leaders of big insurance companies, doctors' organizations and hospital executives.Sullivan emerged from this session with the perfect symbol of the administration's vacuous health policy -- a proposed universal health-care credit card with only one flaw: It doesn't provide any health coverage.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 8, 1991
JAMES CARVILLE went to bed drunk and woke up a genius.The raffish strategist of Harris Wofford's stunning 10-point victory over Dick Thornburgh in the U.S. Senate race -- the Political Earthquake of 1991 -- deserved a one-night blast.Carville, an offbeat, workaholic rogue, not only invented the Wofford campaign that dazzled Pennsylvanians and struck fear in George Bush's heart. Following his dictum -- "never mess with fate" -- Carville had even worn the same underwear the last 10 campaign days.
NEWS
November 7, 1991
If politics could be measured on a Richter scale, the election of Harris Wofford to the U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania on Tuesday would register a 10.Make no mistake that the earth-movement was felt all the way to the lawn of the White House. President Bush knew what was to come when he hurriedly announced on Tuesday afternoon, before the Pennsylvania polls had closed, that he was canceling his long-scheduled trip to Asia and Australia. Having read the exit polls, the president knew for all his spectacular success as a world-class leader, middle America was fed up with his standing in the receiving line for foreign dignitaries while one in 10 Americans was standing in the receiving line for food stamps.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | November 7, 1991
Washington -- Six days after the government announced that by late summer one in ten Americans -- a record -- was on food stamps, Pennsylvanians emphatically declined to make Richard Thornburgh, formerly (among other things) head of President Bush's Domestic Policy Council, one of their senators.On election day, before Mr. Bush suddenly discovered that his trip to Asia was not, after all, urgent, he grumpily complained -- are you ready for this? -- that Harris Wofford had used negative ads. Mr. Bush did not blush.
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