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Tim Wheeler | March 21, 2012
Efforts to restore native oysters in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay are about to begin in earnest, as state and federal officials air plans to conduct large-scale reef rebuilding projects in Harris Creek on the Eastern Shore. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources , along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the US. Army Corps of Engineers , are scheduled to present their plans for oyster restoration work in Harris Creek from 1 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum inSt.
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Tim Wheeler | December 13, 2013
Some long-gone oysters from prehistoric times are going to play a role in restoring the Chesapeake Bay's current crop of bivalves. Maryland has purchased 112,500 tons of fossilized oyster shells for $6.3 million from a quarry in the panhandle of Florida, officials announced Friday. The first 25-car trainload has been offloaded into barges in Baltimore for the last leg of its journey to Harris Creek , a tidal Eastern Shore water way targeted by the state for an ambitious effort to replenish the bay's depleted oyster population.
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Tim Wheeler | May 7, 2012
Spring's time for planting more than flower and vegetable gardens.  it's oyster planting time, too. Last week, the Oyster Recovery Partnership put 31 million baby oysters in Harris Creek, near the mouth of the Choptank River. The oysters were bred at the University of Maryland's Horn Point hatchery , and primed for planting once they had settled as "spat" on old oyster shells. It was the first of a series of plantings the Annapolis-based nonprofit hopes to make this year, seeding Harris Creek, the Severn River and possibly a couple other spots in the Chesapeake Bay with a projected 300-500 million bivalves.
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Tim Wheeler | May 31, 2013
With the weekend upon us, there are events happening in the city aimed at enlisting residents in improving their neighborhoods while also cleaning up Baltimore harbor. Oh, and participants will be getting a little fresh-air exercise in the process. There's a block-by-block trash cleanup Saturday in East Baltimore from 1-3 p.m., starting at the corner of Patterson Park and Eastern Ave., ending at the square in Fells Point. Held in conjunction with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's 25th annual "Clean the Bay Day," it's organized by a Patterson Park activist.  For more, check out " Baltimore Trash Talk " on Facebook.
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Tim Wheeler | February 3, 2013
Now for a bit of good news - and from an environmental group at that. Drew Koslow, the Choptank Riverkeeper, reports that while walking the shore of Harris Creek in Talbot County, he saw an "amazing" abundance of oysters growing in the intertidal zone, inundated by water at high tide but exposed to the air at ebb. "You literally couldn't take a step without walking on oysters," Koslow said in a recent release by the Mid-Shore Riverkeeper Conservancy....
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
It's planting time in the Chesapeake Bay, just as it is on land for farmers and gardeners across Maryland. Instead of seeds, though, hundreds of millions of speck-sized baby oysters - known as spat - are being planted this spring in Harris Creek, where it's hoped they'll grow and multiply. The Eastern Shore waterway is ground zero for an ambitious experiment - a multimillion-dollar gamble, actually - to see if the bay's depleted oyster population can be restored, one creek and river at a time.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 13, 2013
Some long-gone oysters from prehistoric times are going to play a role in restoring the Chesapeake Bay's current crop of bivalves. Maryland has purchased 112,500 tons of fossilized oyster shells for $6.3 million from a quarry in the panhandle of Florida, officials announced Friday. The first 25-car trainload has been offloaded into barges in Baltimore for the last leg of its journey to Harris Creek , a tidal Eastern Shore water way targeted by the state for an ambitious effort to replenish the bay's depleted oyster population.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 31, 2013
With the weekend upon us, there are events happening in the city aimed at enlisting residents in improving their neighborhoods while also cleaning up Baltimore harbor. Oh, and participants will be getting a little fresh-air exercise in the process. There's a block-by-block trash cleanup Saturday in East Baltimore from 1-3 p.m., starting at the corner of Patterson Park and Eastern Ave., ending at the square in Fells Point. Held in conjunction with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's 25th annual "Clean the Bay Day," it's organized by a Patterson Park activist.  For more, check out " Baltimore Trash Talk " on Facebook.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
You won't find Harris Creek on modern maps of Baltimore. For more than a century, it's been filled in and paved over and channeled into underground pipes. But before the industrialization of the Canton waterfront, it was a large body of water - wide enough to be navigable as far north as what is now Patterson Park and deep enough to play host to the boatyard that built the frigate Constellation. The watershed Harris Creek drains is still there in more than 50 miles of underground pipes - along with a small visible vestige of the original creek where a large storm drain spews a mixture of water, runoff and trash into Baltimore Harbor across from the Safeway on Boston Street.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Michael Hankin's comments on the new street sweeping program that has now been initiated in Baltimore are very much appreciated, but the effort will not turn out to be the panacea for the trash problem in city that he suggests ( "A clean sweep," April 7). The view that cooperation rather than enforcement is the best way to clean our Inner Harbor of trash leaves a lot to be desired. His assumption is that most of the trash is on the streets of Baltimore and that street sweeping will be the factor that reduces trash going into the Harbor.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
It's planting time in the Chesapeake Bay, just as it is on land for farmers and gardeners across Maryland. Instead of seeds, though, hundreds of millions of speck-sized baby oysters - known as spat - are being planted this spring in Harris Creek, where it's hoped they'll grow and multiply. The Eastern Shore waterway is ground zero for an ambitious experiment - a multimillion-dollar gamble, actually - to see if the bay's depleted oyster population can be restored, one creek and river at a time.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 3, 2013
Now for a bit of good news - and from an environmental group at that. Drew Koslow, the Choptank Riverkeeper, reports that while walking the shore of Harris Creek in Talbot County, he saw an "amazing" abundance of oysters growing in the intertidal zone, inundated by water at high tide but exposed to the air at ebb. "You literally couldn't take a step without walking on oysters," Koslow said in a recent release by the Mid-Shore Riverkeeper Conservancy....
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 7, 2012
Spring's time for planting more than flower and vegetable gardens.  it's oyster planting time, too. Last week, the Oyster Recovery Partnership put 31 million baby oysters in Harris Creek, near the mouth of the Choptank River. The oysters were bred at the University of Maryland's Horn Point hatchery , and primed for planting once they had settled as "spat" on old oyster shells. It was the first of a series of plantings the Annapolis-based nonprofit hopes to make this year, seeding Harris Creek, the Severn River and possibly a couple other spots in the Chesapeake Bay with a projected 300-500 million bivalves.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 21, 2012
Efforts to restore native oysters in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay are about to begin in earnest, as state and federal officials air plans to conduct large-scale reef rebuilding projects in Harris Creek on the Eastern Shore. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources , along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the US. Army Corps of Engineers , are scheduled to present their plans for oyster restoration work in Harris Creek from 1 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum inSt.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
You won't find Harris Creek on modern maps of Baltimore. For more than a century, it's been filled in and paved over and channeled into underground pipes. But before the industrialization of the Canton waterfront, it was a large body of water - wide enough to be navigable as far north as what is now Patterson Park and deep enough to play host to the boatyard that built the frigate Constellation. The watershed Harris Creek drains is still there in more than 50 miles of underground pipes - along with a small visible vestige of the original creek where a large storm drain spews a mixture of water, runoff and trash into Baltimore Harbor across from the Safeway on Boston Street.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Four Maryland men were charged with power dredging for oysters in a sanctuary on Tilghman Island, the state's Department of Natural Resources said Friday. DNR police charged Bartlett Wade Murphy Jr., 39, Benjamin Murphy, 62, both of Tilghman Island, and Willis Leanard Coleman Jr., 59 of Cambridge, and Robert Andrew Walker, 43 of Hurlock, with removing oysters from the Harris Creek Sanctuary. The state is rebuilding reefs within the sanctuary to restore the bay's oyster population.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1991
NEW HOMES MONTHHomebuilders offering programs through JuneMaryland's homebuilders are offering public information programs and services throughout June, which Gov. William Donald Schaefer has proclaimed "New Homes Month."On Tuesday, June 25, the Home Builders Association of Maryland will hold its annual homebuyers seminar, "Meeting the New Home Challenge."The program, which features a panel of industry experts, will address such issues as choosing a builder, mortgage options and home warranties.
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