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NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | November 24, 1996
"Reflected Glory: The Life of Pamela Churchill Harriman," by Sally Bedell Smith. Simon and Schuster. 514 pages. $27.50. Two years after Christopher Ogden's best-selling "Life of the Party" comes Sally Bedell Smith's biography of Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. Do we need to hear more? Yet where Ogden excelled in depicting the nuances of English social life and is more politically sophisticated, he lapsed into justifications of his subject's behavior.Bedell Smith's colder-eyed reprise, which refuses to flatter the notorious Harriman, is entirely welcome.
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FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun and By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Wedding date: Dec. 31, 2012 Her story: Tiffany Trask, 26, grew up in Columbia and is a nurse in the Navy. Her mother, Karen, is a financial analyst and her father, Tim, is a building supervisor. His story: Jason Harriman, 30, grew up in Laurel. He is a sales representative for an Anheuser-Busch distributor. His father, Guy, is retired, and his mother, Sandra, is the vice president of development at Howard County General Hospital. Their story: Tiffany and Jason met at a happy hour in Ellicott City through mutual friends.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
Although Columbia attorney Guy L. Harriman Jr. touts the possibility of a strong revival for Maryland Republicans this election year, his campaign against two-term Democratic incumbent Thomas M. Yeager for the District 13 state senate seat is a classic example of how tough the competition often remains for the Republicans.The party hopes to capture the delegate seat in the district, which includes Elkridge, Savage, North Laurel and the eastern half of Columbia.But when it comes to his treasury, Harriman is running nearly on empty.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2004
Betty L. Nordaas, a former Verizon executive, has been chosen to run Howard County's elections office, county elections board chairman Guy Harriman confirmed. Nordaas, 53, of Columbia, will replace Robert J. Antonetti Sr., the contentious former administrator who retired March 31 after 3 1/2 years in the post. Harriman would not reveal more about the board's choice until a news conference scheduled for today. Nordaas did not return a reporter's phone calls Friday. Nordaas has seven weeks to ready Howard's office to serve the county's 157,000 voters in the Nov. 2 presidential election.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 24, 1993
AN ANGRY letter writer who says he is rich accuses me of "rich-bashing" in a recent column. Not content with that, he insinuates that I am probably rich myself.I deny this last charge and do so vehemently and categorically, just in case any deadbeat relatives, alumni associations or encyclopedia salesmen happen to be reading this newspaper.If I were rich, would I be wearing an off-the-rack suit that fits as if it had been tailored for Dr. Frankenstein's deformed assistant, Igor?On the other hand I confess gladly to being a basher of the rich.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 25, 1999
TOWN OF RAMAPO, N.Y- a billion years ago, or so the prevailing geological theory has it, the Earth's continental plates collided, pushing up mountains the height of the Himalayas and creating a supercontinent that geologists call Rodinia.In time, the breakup of Rodinia created an ocean, Iapetus, that was itself destroyed when the continents collided and formed yet another supercontinent, Pangaea.Eventually, Pangaea split up, creating North America, Europe, Africa, and the Atlantic Ocean. Finally, erosion and the burden of mile-high glaciers flattened much of the landscape, including present-day metropolitan New York.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 24, 1995
France? The United States is spying on France?What, we want to learn where hemlines are going next year?The French government has asked five Americans to leave the country, saying they say were spying on France for the Central Intelligence Agency.What, however, can we learn by spying on France?L How about putting spies into Iraq or Iran or Libya or China?How do I know we don't have spies in those countries already?Because they would have been caught by now, that's how I know!Our Central Intelligence Agency has been a shambles for years.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2004
Betty L. Nordaas, a former Verizon executive, has been chosen to run Howard County's elections office, county elections board chairman Guy Harriman confirmed. Nordaas, 53, of Columbia, will replace Robert J. Antonetti Sr., the contentious former administrator who retired March 31 after 3 1/2 years in the post. Harriman would not reveal more about the board's choice until a news conference scheduled for today. Nordaas did not return a reporter's phone calls Friday. Nordaas has seven weeks to ready Howard's office to serve the county's 157,000 voters in the Nov. 2 presidential election.
NEWS
January 20, 1993
Murray PhillipsFolk singerEMERSON, N.J. -- Murray Phillips, 83, a folk singer and songwriter, died of leukemia Saturday at his home here.He was best known for his renderings of authentic American ballads from the Revolutionary War era to the early 1900s.He appeared at the Blue Note and other clubs and halls in the New York metropolitan area, and he performed on television. He recorded four albums of children's songs on the RCA label.Born in New York City, he received a bachelor's degree from City College and a master's from Columbia University.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | April 11, 1994
Friday, Joe Rocco finished first with Punch A Dragon in a $4,000 claiming race at Pimlico.Normally, this would cause little excitement, but for the 14-year jockey, "it was like winning a Breeders' Cup race. I never felt so good about anything."It had been a long time between trips to the winner's circle for Rocco, whose lifeblood had been threatened for nearly six months."Five months and 28 days exactly," said Rocco, the victim of several spills last fall that forced him to quit riding and put his career in jeopardy because of a liver problem.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - To those who came to know him along the way, what made Pat Moynihan such a special figure in American public life was less the distinction of his career than the enormous pleasure he drew from it. Whether arguing foreign policy or welfare reform or highway design, he enjoyed himself immensely. He saw politics as a way to achieve great purposes, not just the self-aggrandizement so obviously prized by so many men and women who achieve high office. In his four terms in the Senate and the staggering list of appointive posts he held under four presidents, Pat loved the game.
NEWS
By Glen Collins and Glen Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2002
TOWN OF RAMAPO, N.Y. - "This is my Rosetta Stone," Alexander E. Gates was saying as he stood before a vast chunk of rock near Lake Tiorati in Harriman State Park. A video crew was capturing his every syllable. "A single rock outcrop can reveal the entire geologic history of this park," he said. "And this one shows evidence of a continental collision where two of the Earth's plates hit together, and then later, hot magma intruded at 1,000 degrees centigrade." He gestured toward the gray wall.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 25, 1999
TOWN OF RAMAPO, N.Y- a billion years ago, or so the prevailing geological theory has it, the Earth's continental plates collided, pushing up mountains the height of the Himalayas and creating a supercontinent that geologists call Rodinia.In time, the breakup of Rodinia created an ocean, Iapetus, that was itself destroyed when the continents collided and formed yet another supercontinent, Pangaea.Eventually, Pangaea split up, creating North America, Europe, Africa, and the Atlantic Ocean. Finally, erosion and the burden of mile-high glaciers flattened much of the landscape, including present-day metropolitan New York.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 12, 1998
Do you know what Pamela Harriman was thinking as she stepped into the swimming pool of the Ritz in Paris seconds before she died of a heart attack?She was thinking cosmic thoughts about the women's movement: "How difficult it was for a woman of my generation to find any measure of independence."How do we know this? Because the made-for-cable Lifetime docudrama, "Life of the Party: The Pamela Harriman Story," tells us it is so. And we all know how much we can trust exploitative, sensationalistic, cheesy, low-rent, slimeball, cable TV movies that try to repackage biography and politics for the purposes of entertainment to tell us what went on inside the head of someone who is dead.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski and Pete Bielski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 1998
Was it a mistake to put Greenspring Willy in against $14,500 claimers earlier in his career?"Not really," said Dick Dutrow, the 61-year-old trainer with 40 years experience in the business. "He couldn't win for $25,000, so I put him there."That was before he was put on Lasix. Since receiving the diuretic to help a routine breathing disorder in December, the 3-year-old son of Smarten has been beating all comers.Yesterday, his four opponents in the $50,000-added Harriman Stakes saw him swoosh by in the stretch, clocking 1: 10 1/5 for six furlongs.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a mansion regarded as a shrine to the glamour of Democratic Party politics, wealthy friends of Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening contributed at least $100,000 last night to his 1998 re-election effort.The Georgetown mansion was once owned by W. Averell Harriman, a former New York governor and diplomat, and his wife, Pamela. Glendening was feted by the mansion's owner, Dr. James D'Orta, and more than 100 guests, most of whom paid $1,000 each.The governor seemed somewhat awed by his surroundings.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - To those who came to know him along the way, what made Pat Moynihan such a special figure in American public life was less the distinction of his career than the enormous pleasure he drew from it. Whether arguing foreign policy or welfare reform or highway design, he enjoyed himself immensely. He saw politics as a way to achieve great purposes, not just the self-aggrandizement so obviously prized by so many men and women who achieve high office. In his four terms in the Senate and the staggering list of appointive posts he held under four presidents, Pat loved the game.
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | April 9, 1997
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- I've got what it takes, but it breaks my heart to give it away. At least that was what I was thinking the other night when I was sitting up late, going over my books.Now, as we all know there is a rule of thumb; when you have a little extra money in your checking account, something will come along and eat it right up. That little bit of money I had last July? A week later, the car went up and I came out $53 short. It's been a whole year like that, and it looked like my whole profit margin was going to disappear into one of those black holes in space.
NEWS
By Helen Chappell | April 9, 1997
OYSTERBACK, Md. -- I've got what it takes, but it breaks my heart to give it away. At least that was what I was thinking the other night when I was sitting up late, going over my books.Now, as we all know there is a rule of thumb; when you have a little extra money in your checking account, something will come along and eat it right up. That little bit of money I had last July? A week later, the car went up and I came out $53 short. It's been a whole year like that, and it looked like my whole profit margin was going to disappear into one of those black holes in space.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The famous, the near-famous and the never-famous converged on the National Cathedral yesterday to bid adieu to Pamela Harriman, the ambassador to France who built a legend around her political connections and high-powered salons.Part diplomat, part fund-raiser, part aristocrat -- and, some might say, part vixen -- she was remembered yesterday as a patriotic American who had served her country well. In the crowd of 1,157 that gathered for her funeral, the far reach of her charms was boldly in evidence.
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