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Harriet Tubman

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February 2, 2007
Harriet Tubman 1820-1913 For her freedom was like heaven Harriet Tubman, born a slave on a plantation in Dorchester County, was 29 years old when she seized the opportunity to escape to freedom in the north. The year was 1849 and as she stood on a hill in Pennsylvania, a free woman for the first time in her life, her thoughts raced. "I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person," recalled the woman who came to be called the "Moses" of her people. "There was such a glory over everything.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The streets around City Dock in Annapolis flooded again Friday, closing the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport neighborhood with downtown for several hours. It was yet another reminder to Lisa Craig that she's in a race against time to protect one of Maryland's oldest communities from the rising waters of the Chesapeake Bay. "We've probably doubled the number of nuisance flooding events in the past several years," said Craig, director of historic preservation for the city of Annapolis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
In addition to such things as new recording contracts and a nationally recognized education program, Marin Alsop's influence as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra can be seen in the programming each season. She typically weaves connective threads through concert repertoire. For 2011-2012, that thread involves commemorating extraordinary women, including Joan of Arc in November. This weekend, Harriet Tubman is the focus, via the premiere of a work by James Lee III, a Morgan State University professor whose finely crafted music has been gaining increased exposure nationally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Though he was a man of the cloth, Charles Turner Torrey went out of his way to publicly mock his enemies and alienate his ever-dwindling supply of friends. He was always short of money. He abandoned - or at least, severely neglected - his wife and two children. During a celebrated court case in the 1840s, he was described as "the most hated man in Maryland. " But a new book makes the case that the difficult, driven minister was one of the greatest abolitionists in U.S. history, although almost no one today knows his name.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
Harriet Tubman was one tough lady. She escaped slavery, fleeing an Eastern Shore plantation. She was a leader in the Underground Railroad, traveling at night under the North Star — probably along the Choptank River — hiding at safe houses along the path to freedom. During the Civil War, she saw duty as a spy, assisting Union forces that raided plantations and freed slaves along the Combahee River in South Carolina. Tubman played an outsized role in American history, a contribution that is recently (and belatedly)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Media mogul Russell Simmons might have apologized for posting a controversial parody video on his YouTube channel that's become known as "The Harriet Tubman Sex Tapes. " But, the famed abolitionist's great-great-great grandniece isn't even close to forgiving him. In a two-paged open letter to Simmons that was emailed to a reporter at The Baltimore Sun, the artist Tina Martin Wyatt verges on accusing the entertainer of being a race traitor. "Your parody of Aunt Harriet is not unlike parodies of African Americans by racist individuals in this country and others abroad," Wyatt writes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is all about brand-new this month. Two weeks after premiering David T. Little's Baltimore-inspired "Charm," the BSO is set to premiere another commissioned work - "Chuphshah! Harriet's Drive to Canaan," by James Lee III. Lee's composition - in Biblical Hebrew, "chuphshah" means "freedom" - connects to a theme running through the BSO's season: music to celebrate women who persevered against oppression. "Harriet Tubman's ties to Maryland and heroic efforts to shepherd hundreds out of slavery … inspired me to commission a new work to honor and celebrate her legacy," BSO music director Marin Alsop said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
After Ernestine Martin Wyatt helped stage a walkout decades ago over a lack of African-American history lessons at her high school, a teacher pulled her aside to ask about Wyatt's family ties to Harriet Tubman. The Maryland-born slave and famed conductor of the Underground Railroad left a personal legacy in her family, Wyatt, a distant niece of the abolitionist, said Saturday: a succession of strong women. And it's that more personal side of Tubman that Wyatt hopes America comes to know during the forthcoming centennial of her death.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 25, 1994
Single-actor shows are extraordinarily difficult to bring off for obvious reasons. But "Sweet Chariot," the account of the life of Harriet Tubman, succeeds where many fail.It does so for several reasons. First, there is the riveting subject matter; the story of the escaped slave from Maryland's Eastern Shore whose work as a "conductor" on the storied Underground Railroad became symbolic of America's war of conscience against the scourge of slavery is a pretty dramatic premise even before a single line is spoken.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1995
CAMBRIDGE -- Dorchester County-born slave Harriet Ross Tubman was honored as a saint here yesterday in the Episcopal church where her owner had been a baptized member.The service of song and word in the 303-year-old Great Choptank Parish would probably have amazed the 19th-century freedom fighter in her own time.But it was extraordinary enough even in present-day Cambridge. Whites and blacks packed Christ Episcopal Church, as the parish is also known, to "re-examine the mistakes of our past," in the words of the Rev. Linda Wheatley, one of the participants.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Harriet Tubman, the Marylander credited with leading hundreds of slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad, was honored with a Google Doodle today. The Google search engine periodically uses an artistic interpretation of its logo, known as the Doodle, to honor famous people or commemorate holidays and events. The Tubman-inspired logo that appeared Saturday features a drawing of Tubman holding a lantern against a night sky, with the letters made to look like tree branches.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | October 8, 2013
50 Years Ago Homegrown talent "Local Talent Entertains at Harriet Tubman, PTA. "The Harriet Tubman High School PTA held its first activity for the year, an October Feast. "In reality, this was a 'kick off' dinner to start the PTA membership drive, as well as, to begin the 1963-64 activities. The program this year consisted of home talent rather than having a guest speaker from outside the county. "Morris L. Woodson, Principal of the Guildford Elementary School, acted as Toastmaster.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Media mogul Russell Simmons might have apologized for posting a controversial parody video on his YouTube channel that's become known as "The Harriet Tubman Sex Tapes. " But, the famed abolitionist's great-great-great grandniece isn't even close to forgiving him. In a two-paged open letter to Simmons that was emailed to a reporter at The Baltimore Sun, the artist Tina Martin Wyatt verges on accusing the entertainer of being a race traitor. "Your parody of Aunt Harriet is not unlike parodies of African Americans by racist individuals in this country and others abroad," Wyatt writes.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Recent news about climate change reveals big issues facing the Eastern Shore: a shrinking shoreline, more and bigger storms, and more salinity in our lands and farms. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the Chesapeake Bay will rise two feet by 2050. Every person in the region will be affected in some way with Dorchester County especially vulnerable with submersion of region-defining landmarks such as the Blackwater Wildlife Refuge and sites along the newly minted Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Harriet Tubman certainly deserves recognition, but why are we funding with federal dollars a $21 million monument and visitor center in her honor at a time when we are closing national parks, shutting down FAA control towers and dealing with sequester issues ("A monument to Md. abolitionist," March 26)? Our elected officials seem to have lost contact with reality in pursuing their political ambitions. Gov. Martin O'Malley went off campaigning in South Carolina claiming he cut state spending "big time," all the while supporting the Tubman monument.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
President Barack Obama's designation Monday of a new national monument to Harriet Tubman, who escaped slavery on a Dorchester County plantation in 1849, then helped guide scores of other slaves to freedom in the North during the decade before the Civil War, honors a small and unprepossessing African-American woman who played an outsized role in American history. Mr. Obama's proclamation sets aside the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument near the city of Cambridge on Maryland's Eastern Shore as a historical preservation site to be administered by the National Park Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | February 1, 2004
Few Maryland figures so enshrined in history have remained so enshrouded by myth as the woman called Moses: Harriet Tubman. Frequent distortions have exaggerated the number of slaves she freed and the size of the bounty on her head, among other details. Countless retellings of her escape from slavery and forays back to Dorchester County to liberate her family display unabashed hero worship. Indeed, while at least 40 books written in a half-century rehashed her exploits for the juvenile market, there was a dearth of scholarship on her life.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
President Barack Obama set aside 480 acres on the Eastern Shore on Monday as a national monument to honor Harriet Tubman - a victory for advocates who have long sought to memorialize the abolitionist's role in leading dozens of slaves to freedom. Relying on a century-old federal law, Obama expanded a smaller park the state recently broke ground on in Dorchester County, where Tubman was born into slavery in 1822. The new designation places the rural land in the National Park Service's control, protecting it from development.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
After Ernestine Martin Wyatt helped stage a walkout decades ago over a lack of African-American history lessons at her high school, a teacher pulled her aside to ask about Wyatt's family ties to Harriet Tubman. The Maryland-born slave and famed conductor of the Underground Railroad left a personal legacy in her family, Wyatt, a distant niece of the abolitionist, said Saturday: a succession of strong women. And it's that more personal side of Tubman that Wyatt hopes America comes to know during the forthcoming centennial of her death.
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