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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 24, 2005
BOSTON -- Call me a cockeyed pessimist, but I'm having trouble finding any good news in the trashing of Harriet Miers. Somehow Ms. Miers has become proof that we have moved on to a great gender-free utopia, a post-feminist world in which we can now mercilessly tear down a woman without fear of being labeled a sexist piglet. First we were told that Ms. Miers got the nod as a woman. Now we are told that the full-scale attack proves she is one of the boys. Whoopee. I'm not a big fan of Ms. Miers, but I do not see her as proof of the arch prediction that equality would be the day mediocre women take their place beside mediocre men. So I can't sign on with those who see the slashing of Ms. Miers by women as a sign of progress for women.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee warned Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers yesterday that members will ask whether she would act independently of President Bush. Issues of executive power will surface in confirmation hearings "in light of your close relationship with the president and the key positions you have held in the White House," Sen. Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania Republican, wrote in a letter to Miers. Hearings are scheduled to start Nov. 7. The nominee, meanwhile, continued private meetings with senators, including a Louisiana Republican who issued a less-than-enthusiastic comment afterward.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 11, 2005
When the first news stories about Harriet Miers' nomination to the Supreme Court all used the same quote from President Bush describing her as "a pit bull in size 6 shoes," I decided I would listen carefully to this debate. Even before all the criticism of cronyism and her thin qualifications, I had the feeling that this conversation - coming so close on the heels of the confirmation of John Roberts as chief justice - was going to be different. And it certainly has been. "When it comes to cross-examination, she can fillet better than Mrs. Paul."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 24, 2005
BOSTON -- Call me a cockeyed pessimist, but I'm having trouble finding any good news in the trashing of Harriet Miers. Somehow Ms. Miers has become proof that we have moved on to a great gender-free utopia, a post-feminist world in which we can now mercilessly tear down a woman without fear of being labeled a sexist piglet. First we were told that Ms. Miers got the nod as a woman. Now we are told that the full-scale attack proves she is one of the boys. Whoopee. I'm not a big fan of Ms. Miers, but I do not see her as proof of the arch prediction that equality would be the day mediocre women take their place beside mediocre men. So I can't sign on with those who see the slashing of Ms. Miers by women as a sign of progress for women.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | October 5, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Ronald Reagan used a phrase in his dealings with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev: Trust, but verify. Mr. Reagan's point was that Mr. Gorbachev's words sounded good, but that they must be tested to see if he meant them. That standard should be applied to President Bush's nomination of Harriet Miers to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court. The reason verification has special relevance to the Miers nomination is that like Ms. Miers, Justice O'Connor had a thin record.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Before President Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet E. Miers to the Supreme Court, his deputy chief of staff, Karl Rove, called influential Christian leader James Dobson to assure him that Miers was a conservative evangelical Christian, Dobson said in remarks scheduled for broadcast today on his national radio show. In that conversation, which has been the subject of feverish speculation, Rove also told Dobson that one reason the president was passing over better-known conservatives was that many on the White House shortlist had asked not to be considered, Dobson said, according to an advance transcript of the broadcast provided by his organization, Focus on the Family.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
Call it the Dick Cheney precedent. President Bush has chosen Harriet Miers, the White House counsel, who was helping him pick the next Supreme Court justice, as the best person to fill the slot -- just as he chose Mr. Cheney, who led the vice presidential search in 2000, for that job. But unlike Mr. Cheney, who had vast government and corporate experience before becoming vice president, Ms. Miers comes to this nomination with a rather narrow rM-isumM-i....
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush indicated yesterday that Harriet E. Miers' religious beliefs were a reason he chose to nominate her to the Supreme Court, comments that drew quick criticism from liberal groups that said religion should not be considered a qualification to sit on the nation's highest bench. Bush's remarks came on the same day as Christian leader James Dobson, president of Focus on the Family, told his radio show listeners that White House deputy chief of staff Karl Rove assured him before the announcement of Miers' selection that she was a committed evangelical Christian.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee warned Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers yesterday that members will ask whether she would act independently of President Bush. Issues of executive power will surface in confirmation hearings "in light of your close relationship with the president and the key positions you have held in the White House," Sen. Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania Republican, wrote in a letter to Miers. Hearings are scheduled to start Nov. 7. The nominee, meanwhile, continued private meetings with senators, including a Louisiana Republican who issued a less-than-enthusiastic comment afterward.
NEWS
October 17, 2005
Miers must prove she respects rights Although I'm sure there are still people who think that only males are capable of serving us in governmental positions, I'm definitely not one of them, and I think and hope their number is declining. At any rate, I think the fact that Harriet Miers is a woman has little to nothing to do with the opposition on the right or left to her nomination by President Bush to replace Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court ("Is Miers hurt by gender issue?"
NEWS
October 19, 2005
Cutting food aid is dreadful choice The birth of a fiscal conscience on the part of the chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, is certainly commendable - we all need to be better fiscal stewards ("Feeding hunger, not greed," editorial, Oct. 10). But the lack of a moral conscience among the members of that committee is abhorrent. At a time of increasing need caused by higher levels of poverty and the fallout from natural disasters, what is called for, if anything, is an increase in funding for effective programs such as food stamps that meet the basic needs of Americans.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush indicated yesterday that Harriet E. Miers' religious beliefs were a reason he chose to nominate her to the Supreme Court, comments that drew quick criticism from liberal groups that said religion should not be considered a qualification to sit on the nation's highest bench. Bush's remarks came on the same day as Christian leader James Dobson, president of Focus on the Family, told his radio show listeners that White House deputy chief of staff Karl Rove assured him before the announcement of Miers' selection that she was a committed evangelical Christian.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Before President Bush nominated White House counsel Harriet E. Miers to the Supreme Court, his deputy chief of staff, Karl Rove, called influential Christian leader James Dobson to assure him that Miers was a conservative evangelical Christian, Dobson said in remarks scheduled for broadcast today on his national radio show. In that conversation, which has been the subject of feverish speculation, Rove also told Dobson that one reason the president was passing over better-known conservatives was that many on the White House shortlist had asked not to be considered, Dobson said, according to an advance transcript of the broadcast provided by his organization, Focus on the Family.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 11, 2005
When the first news stories about Harriet Miers' nomination to the Supreme Court all used the same quote from President Bush describing her as "a pit bull in size 6 shoes," I decided I would listen carefully to this debate. Even before all the criticism of cronyism and her thin qualifications, I had the feeling that this conversation - coming so close on the heels of the confirmation of John Roberts as chief justice - was going to be different. And it certainly has been. "When it comes to cross-examination, she can fillet better than Mrs. Paul."
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 10, 2005
CHICAGO -- With Alan Greenspan due to step down in January as chairman of the Federal Reserve, there is a lot of speculation about who will replace him. Big-name candidates abound, but I'm betting on the accountant who does President Bush's taxes. The 19th century writer Henry Adams said that the progression of presidents from Washington to Grant refuted the theory of evolution. He could have said the same thing about the Supreme Court appointments made by President Bush, who has nominated one of the strongest candidates in the last 50 years and one of the weakest.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 10, 2005
CHICAGO -- With Alan Greenspan due to step down in January as chairman of the Federal Reserve, there is a lot of speculation about who will replace him. Big-name candidates abound, but I'm betting on the accountant who does President Bush's taxes. The 19th century writer Henry Adams said that the progression of presidents from Washington to Grant refuted the theory of evolution. He could have said the same thing about the Supreme Court appointments made by President Bush, who has nominated one of the strongest candidates in the last 50 years and one of the weakest.
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