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NEWS
April 3, 2005
A free health fair focusing on children's health and safety will be held tomorrow at the Harriet Lane Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Topics to be covered include safety seats, menu planning, dental care and parenting skills. Experts will be available to offer advice, and there will be literature and giveaways. The fair, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., is open to the public. Those interested in attending should enter the hospital's main entrance at 600 N. Wolfe St. and follow signs for the Harriet Lane Clinic.
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NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | December 29, 2006
Scheronda Gilliam took her son to the Harriet Lane Clinic in East Baltimore to make sure he was healthy. But besides medical advice for her baby, Gilliam received tips about GED classes and job training for herself, information that could help her son as well. "I want to make a better person of myself," said Gilliam, a 33-year-old janitor who would rather work with computers. Helping Gilliam to reach her technology goal were Sam Zand and Dan Cataldo, Johns Hopkins University students who are volunteers with Project Health, a program that connects disenfranchised and low-income adults with public benefits such as medical care, housing and education.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
Just before the Civil War, Harriet Lane brought grace and style to the White House - and left a major pediatric legacy.Who was the best first lady ever? A poll of academics by the Siena College Research Institute a decade ago concluded it was Eleanor Roosevelt. In his readable and comprehensive 2003 book based in part on the survey (Rating the First Ladies, Citadel Press, 374 pages, $22.95), John B. Roberts II wrote that she set the precedent for a first lady to have her own causes and constituencies - and then after the White House she became a significant influence on national and world affairs in her own right as an advocacy journalist and United Nations delegate.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
A free health fair focusing on children's health and safety will be held tomorrow at the Harriet Lane Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Topics to be covered include safety seats, menu planning, dental care and parenting skills. Experts will be available to offer advice, and there will be literature and giveaways. The fair, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., is open to the public. Those interested in attending should enter the hospital's main entrance at 600 N. Wolfe St. and follow signs for the Harriet Lane Clinic.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 30, 1991
THREE DEMOCRATIC presidential candidates are single, as Susan Baer pointed out in this paper recently.They are Jerry Brown, who used to squire pop singer Linda Ronstadt; Sen. Bob Kerrey, who used to squire movie star Debra Winger, and Gov. Doug Wilder, who squires zillionaire socialite Patricia Kluge.Should one become president, he would be the first eligible bachelor to enter the White House since Grover Cleveland in 1884. Cleveland was also elected again later, in 1892, but by then he had wed. Woodrow Wilson was widowed in 1914, re-married in 1915, before being re-elected in 1916.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | December 29, 2006
Scheronda Gilliam took her son to the Harriet Lane Clinic in East Baltimore to make sure he was healthy. But besides medical advice for her baby, Gilliam received tips about GED classes and job training for herself, information that could help her son as well. "I want to make a better person of myself," said Gilliam, a 33-year-old janitor who would rather work with computers. Helping Gilliam to reach her technology goal were Sam Zand and Dan Cataldo, Johns Hopkins University students who are volunteers with Project Health, a program that connects disenfranchised and low-income adults with public benefits such as medical care, housing and education.
FEATURES
By Edgar J. Bracco | July 7, 1991
Most of us know Lincoln, Washington, Kennedy, Truman, the Roosevelts, Woodrow Wilson. But James Buchanan?Yes, indeed. He is not one of the best-known or most respected presidents, but he was the 15th person to hold the office, from 1857-1861, just before Abraham Lincoln. He was totally a Pennsylvanian -- born in Franklin County, graduated from Dickinson College in Carlisle, studied law in Lancaster. Then he went into politics.Everything that has been written about him indicates a man of integrity, but perhaps one who should not have been president.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Allison Steele and Lisa Goldberg, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Allison Steele,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2001
Summer vacation started on a tragic note for students at Columbia's Atholton High School yesterday with news that one of their own had died in a car crash a few blocks from school minutes after the year's last bell rang. Danny Ong, 17, and his brother, Tony, 16, of North Laurel were on their way to drop off a friend at his North Laurel home about 10:40 a.m. when the car plowed into a utility pole, knocking out a transformer. The impact killed Danny Ong and shattered the pole, causing it to crash, wires and all, onto the passenger side of the car. Police said Danny Ong was apparently speeding as his 1991 maroon Honda Accord rounded a curve on Harriet Tubman Lane west of the school.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
On Wednesday, June 22, 2005, ALAN SCHMALL; loving husband of Diane Schmall (nee Wosk); beloved father of Beth Alexander of Owings Mills, MD and Mark Schmall of Columbia, MD; devoted father-in-law of Alethea Schmall; loving grandfather of Chandler and Daniel Alexander and Aden Schmall; loving son of Dorothy Weinstein; loving son-in-law of Goldie Wosk; brother of David Schmall of Boca Raton, FL; dear brother-in-law of Elaine Reid and Linda Schmall....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
The Johns Hopkins Children's Center — originally founded as the Harriet Lane Home for Invalid Children — celebrated its centenary earlier this month. Its endowment originated from the largesse of Harriet Lane, who during the mid-19th century was considered one of Washington's most glamorous women and hostesses. Harriet Rebecca Lane — she later dropped her middle name — was born in 1830 in Mercersburg, Pa., the daughter of Elliott Tole Lane and Jane Ann Buchanan Lane, and raised in Franklin County, Pa. Her mother was the sister of James Buchanan, who would become the 15th president of the United States in 1857.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
Just before the Civil War, Harriet Lane brought grace and style to the White House - and left a major pediatric legacy.Who was the best first lady ever? A poll of academics by the Siena College Research Institute a decade ago concluded it was Eleanor Roosevelt. In his readable and comprehensive 2003 book based in part on the survey (Rating the First Ladies, Citadel Press, 374 pages, $22.95), John B. Roberts II wrote that she set the precedent for a first lady to have her own causes and constituencies - and then after the White House she became a significant influence on national and world affairs in her own right as an advocacy journalist and United Nations delegate.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Allison Steele and Lisa Goldberg, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Allison Steele,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2001
Summer vacation started on a tragic note for students at Columbia's Atholton High School yesterday with news that one of their own had died in a car crash a few blocks from school minutes after the year's last bell rang. Danny Ong, 17, and his brother, Tony, 16, of North Laurel were on their way to drop off a friend at his North Laurel home about 10:40 a.m. when the car plowed into a utility pole, knocking out a transformer. The impact killed Danny Ong and shattered the pole, causing it to crash, wires and all, onto the passenger side of the car. Police said Danny Ong was apparently speeding as his 1991 maroon Honda Accord rounded a curve on Harriet Tubman Lane west of the school.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 30, 1991
THREE DEMOCRATIC presidential candidates are single, as Susan Baer pointed out in this paper recently.They are Jerry Brown, who used to squire pop singer Linda Ronstadt; Sen. Bob Kerrey, who used to squire movie star Debra Winger, and Gov. Doug Wilder, who squires zillionaire socialite Patricia Kluge.Should one become president, he would be the first eligible bachelor to enter the White House since Grover Cleveland in 1884. Cleveland was also elected again later, in 1892, but by then he had wed. Woodrow Wilson was widowed in 1914, re-married in 1915, before being re-elected in 1916.
FEATURES
By Edgar J. Bracco | July 7, 1991
Most of us know Lincoln, Washington, Kennedy, Truman, the Roosevelts, Woodrow Wilson. But James Buchanan?Yes, indeed. He is not one of the best-known or most respected presidents, but he was the 15th person to hold the office, from 1857-1861, just before Abraham Lincoln. He was totally a Pennsylvanian -- born in Franklin County, graduated from Dickinson College in Carlisle, studied law in Lancaster. Then he went into politics.Everything that has been written about him indicates a man of integrity, but perhaps one who should not have been president.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Two teenagers were injured in a single-car crash Monday afternoon in Columbia, after an 18-year-old driver left the roadway and slammed into a telephone pole. Daniel Howard Baker, of the 6000 block of Mellow Wine Way in Columbia, was driving a 1996 Acura southeast on the 8000 block of Harriet Tubman Lane when the collision occurred shortly after 4 p.m., according to Howard County police. He was transported via Maryland State Police helicopter to the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was listed in critical condition.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 19, 2008
Dr. Josette W. Bianchine, a retired Johns Hopkins pediatrician who worked in genetics, died of congestive heart failure June 6 at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. She was 79. Born Josette Woel in Gonaive, Haiti, she studied at l'Ecole LaLue and came to the United States on a scholarship to the University of Illinois at Urbana, where she earned a biology degree. She was a 1958 graduate of State University of New York Upstate Medical University at Syracuse. She did an internship and residency in pediatrics and then served as chief resident at the Harriet Lane program at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
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