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NEWS
June 29, 2003
The average American eats more than 30 pounds of french fries each year. -- Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser (HarperCollins)
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 21, 2012
A flurry of new children's books is headed for the shelves, and the authors carry some very familiar names, including Stephen Colbert. A look at the future: -- Colbert's book, "I Am a Pole (And So Can You!)" is scheduled for a May 8 release, according to USA Today . The article notes that the tale, mentioned in his January interview with author Maurice Sendak, became an Internet sensation. "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to write a children's book. I hope the minutes you and your loved ones spend reading it are as fulfilling as the minutes I spent writing it," Colbert said in a statement.
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FEATURES
April 15, 1998
A good children's book can be quite expensive, though never as much as a pair of jeans or a good dinner out. Some publishers offer bargain-basement prices on books for young children.* Golden Books. These are mass produced in several sizes with titles and designs that go back 50 years or more. Some have become classics. All are less than $2. Favorites are "The Little Red Caboose," "Little Toot," "Animal Daddies and My Daddy" and "Dumbo."* HarperCollins "I Can Read" Series. These are slightly more expensive titles, but each is still less than $4. The series features some of the best writers for beginning readers in a sturdy paperback form.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carole Goldberg and Carole Goldberg,Special to The Hartford Courant | January 11, 2009
The Red Convertible: Selected and New Stories 1978-2008 By Louise Erdrich HarperCollins / 494 pages / $27.99 Louise Erdrich's first story collection, The Red Convertible, may make you wonder why the Pulitzer judges have not yet awarded her the prize for fiction. This all-you-can-read buffet of stories, some well-known and some never before published, as well as versions of material from three of her 12 novels, represents her work spanning the past 30 years. It is a magnificent feast.
NEWS
By Esther B. Fein and Esther B. Fein,New York Times News Service GtB | October 4, 1991
First came the coup of the Kremlin; now comes the coup between hard covers: President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has sold his account of the August uprising for a reported $500,000 to HarperCollins.Giving new heft and meaning to the ever-growing field of quickie books, HarperCollins says it plans to translate the 74-page typed manuscript, print it, bind it and ship it to stores before the end of this month.In a nation where Nikita S. Khrushchev, after his own overthrow, was forced to write his memoirs in secret and smuggle them out of the country, many Kremlin denizens are now tell-all graphomaniacs.
NEWS
January 21, 1995
The old curse of "would that mine enemy would write a book" is becoming "would that mine enemy would sign a book contract." A month after Newt Gingrich revealed he had signed a book deal with HarperCollins calling for a roughly $4.5 million advance, Democrats are still making points by attacking him for that. First they said the advance was a means to gain influence by Rupert Murdoch, whose corporation owns HarperCollins. When Mr. Gingrich canceled the advance, he was attacked off and on the House floor for the fact that he would still get royalties on books sold.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | May 18, 2008
BRIGHT SHINY MORNING By James Frey HarperCollins / 512 pages / $26.95 Bright Shiny Morning is a terrible book. But you have to give James Frey credit for one thing: He's got chutzpah. Two and a half years after he was eviscerated by Oprah Winfrey for exaggerating many of the incidents in his now-discredited memoir, A Million Little Pieces, he's back with this book, which aims to be the big novel about Los Angeles. Clearly, HarperCollins, Frey's publisher, expects a lot from this book; it reportedly paid $1.5 million for it. Ultimately, though, it is still what's on the page that matters, and Bright Shiny Morning is a literary train wreck without even the good grace to be entertaining.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich answered ethical charges against him in a "very freewheeling exchange" with the House ethics committee yesterday but wouldn't share details of the melee with the public.As he entered the closed committee meeting, Mr. Gingrich, who has labeled the accusations filed by various Democrats as "pathetic," flashed a Cheshire cat smile and mumbled, "It will be an interesting day."Afterward, the normally chatty Georgia Republican said only, "I'm through for the day," and indicated a willingness to appear again "at the convenience" of the committee.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1997
NEW YORK -- Salvatore Gravano, the former mob killer who has become a major government witness against the Mafia, told a federal jury in Brooklyn yesterday that he had been paid about $250,000 for a best-selling book about his bloody career and hoped to earn as much as $1 million more from a possible movie deal.The revelation came during Gravano's testimony as the star prosecution witness in the murder and racketeering trial of Vincent Gigante, who is accused of heading the powerful Genovese crime family.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 10, 1993
I must have finally made a name for himself. I have bee asked to contribute to the prestigious "Washington, D.C., Access Guide" by the guide's publisher, HarperCollins.As Gomer used to say: "Well, Gaw-aw-aw-lee!"Not that I know anything about Washington.I know what most Baltimoreans know about it: lots of square buildings, monuments, politicians, snooty restaurants with snobby maitre d's, great museums, arboreal delights, and a totally stupid street system. If I drive to Washington, I take New York Avenue.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | May 18, 2008
BRIGHT SHINY MORNING By James Frey HarperCollins / 512 pages / $26.95 Bright Shiny Morning is a terrible book. But you have to give James Frey credit for one thing: He's got chutzpah. Two and a half years after he was eviscerated by Oprah Winfrey for exaggerating many of the incidents in his now-discredited memoir, A Million Little Pieces, he's back with this book, which aims to be the big novel about Los Angeles. Clearly, HarperCollins, Frey's publisher, expects a lot from this book; it reportedly paid $1.5 million for it. Ultimately, though, it is still what's on the page that matters, and Bright Shiny Morning is a literary train wreck without even the good grace to be entertaining.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Sun | July 22, 2007
Gut Feelings The Intelligence of the Unconscious Gone to the Crazies A Memoir By Alison Weaver HarperCollins / 245 pages / $24.95 Socrates noted that the unexamined life is not worth living. But what of the life over-examined by others? Alison Weaver was born the child of privilege. Her father was wealthy, her mother, nearly 30 years his junior, a Manhattan trophy wife who drank. Weaver attended the best schools but felt alienated and alone. She filled the void with extraordinary amounts of drugs and alcohol.
NEWS
By Erika Schickel and Erika Schickel,Chicago Tribune | November 12, 2006
Truck: A Love Story Michael Perry HarperCollins / 281 pages / $24.95 Author Michael Perry had but two simple goals in winter 2003: "Grow a garden and recapture my youth. That, and get my decrepit 1951 L-120 International pickup truck running in time for deer hunting season in November." The premise of Truck: A Love Story is deceptively simple: the recounting of one year in the middle of one man's life. Perry, confirmed bachelor and author of the best-selling memoir Population: 485, uses the truck and his garden as a springboard for his further musings on small-town life in northern Wisconsin.
NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2006
The Conservative Soul: How We Lost It, How to Get It Back Andrew Sullivan HarperCollins / 294 pages / $25.95 In his Grand Old Party (2003), historian Lewis L. Gould credits Ronald Reagan with "transforming the Republican Party into a conservative unit with a diminishing band of moderates on its fringes. His advocacy of smaller government, deregulation, and private enterprise commanded general assent while he was in office." This conformity of thought may have been the apogee of conservative like-mindedness, despite Republican control of Congress and the White House in the first years of this century.
NEWS
By Louise Steinman and Louise Steinman,Los Angeles Times | September 17, 2006
The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million Daniel Mendelsohn HarperCollins / 514 pages / $27.95 Shmiel Ja(double period above the a)ger was a prosperous businessman, a macher, in "a small town of a few thousand people, located halfway around the world in a landscape that belonged first to Austria and then to Poland and then to many others." The town was called Bolechow. It's now in Ukraine. You've probably never heard of it. After reading Daniel Mendelsohn's The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, you'll never forget it. For centuries, the family of Mendelsohn's maternal grandfather, Abraham Jaeger, owned and ran a butcher shop in Bolechow.
NEWS
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | September 3, 2006
All Aunt Hagar's Children Edward P. Jones Amistad / HarperCollins / 416 Pages / $25.95 The fourteen stories collected in Edward P. Jones' extraordinary All Aunt Hagar's Children traverse the length of the 20th century as it was experienced in black neighborhoods in and around Washington. Many of the characters that populate these stories have recently migrated to the capital and stand divided between meeting the demands of their urban setting and maintaining the customs and values that shaped their former lives in the deep South.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | January 6, 1995
SAY IT AIN'T so, Al. No sooner does Newt Gingrich give up an unseemly $4.5 million advance from HarperCollins and settle instead for a token $1 than another publisher, Hyperion, announces the August publication of "Enough Is Enough: Pasta, Potholes, and Other Things Worth Fighting For," by Sen. Al D'Amato, R-N.Y.As HarperCollins is owned by a media magnate, Rupert Murdoch, who has dealings before Congress, so Hyperion is owned by Disney, which may seek to curry favor on the Hill should it go through with its threat to revive the Disney's America theme park.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 21, 2012
A flurry of new children's books is headed for the shelves, and the authors carry some very familiar names, including Stephen Colbert. A look at the future: -- Colbert's book, "I Am a Pole (And So Can You!)" is scheduled for a May 8 release, according to USA Today . The article notes that the tale, mentioned in his January interview with author Maurice Sendak, became an Internet sensation. "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to write a children's book. I hope the minutes you and your loved ones spend reading it are as fulfilling as the minutes I spent writing it," Colbert said in a statement.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
To Hate Like This Is To Be Happy Forever: A Thoroughly Obsessive, Intermittently Uplifting, And Occasionally Unbiased Account Of The Duke-North Carolina Basketball Rivalry Will Blythe HarperCollins / 357 pages / $24.95 If this book were a ballgame, ESPN would proclaim it to be an "instant classic." Dick Vitale might finally be at a loss for superlatives. One can only hope. Before I gush further, a disclaimer is in order: Like author Will Blythe, the former literary editor at Esquire magazine, I am a Tar Heel through and through.
NEWS
By DAVID CAUTE | November 27, 2005
Elia Kazan: A Biography Richard Schickel HarperCollins / 510 pages From his formative years, Elia Kazan's role models among directors included Stanislavsky, Dovzhenko and the maestros of European expressionism. As a quintessentially American genius of stage and screen, passionately believing in "roots," Kazan unveiled Marlon Brando and James Dean for audiences far beyond America's shores. During his heyday (1930-1960), Kazan virtually re-explored the terrain of John Dos Passos' trilogy, U.S.A.
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