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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2005
Bay Theatre Company continues its third season with Harold Pinter's Betrayal - the company's seventh play and the fifth in its intimate 90-seat West Garrett Place playhouse at 275 West St. At a recent rehearsal, Bay Theatre founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby described Betrayal as one of Pinter's more accessible works. Betrayal tells the story of Emma, a woman who has an affair with her husband's best friend, Jerry. The play opens at the end of the affair and works backward. Along the way it illustrates the power of deceit and willful blindness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
In Harold Pinter's “The Caretaker,” men who seem to have empty centers where their hearts should be engage in a strange dance involving intimidation and entitlement. In David Mamet's “Glengarry Glen Ross,” which the playwright dedicated to Pinter, men with voids where their morals should be thrash about in a desperate game that also involves intimidation and entitlement. These are two very different works, to be sure, but they share some gritty elements, pose similarly tough questions about human nature, and leave us with similarly elusive answers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 1, 2001
`Bye Bye Birdie' opens Olney Theatre season Olney Theatre Center opens its 2001 season tomorrow with "Bye Bye Birdie," the 1961 Adams and Strouse musical about a rock and roll star and his effect on the teens in small-town America. Continuing the practice instituted two seasons ago, the season opener showcases young musical-theater performers from the Washington area. Here's the rest of the Olney main-stage season: "The Rivals," by Richard Brinsley Sheridan (April 17-May 20); "Art," by Yasmina Reza (June 5-July 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The time-worn 1960s London residence where Harold Pinter's "The Homecoming" takes place contains a family that puts the "dys-" in dysfunctional. A surprise visit by a long-absent son with a wife no one knows about merely causes the already claustrophobic world to close in more tightly, threatening everyone under the roof, one way or another. The 1965 play, which has been given a thoughtful, generally impressive production by Center Stage , can still provoke, confuse and offend — and amuse, for that matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2005
Political fare For its summer residency of politically charged plays, the Potomac Theatre Project is presenting three productions in repertory through Aug. 7 at Olney Theatre Center. Snoo Wilson's Lovesong of the Electric Bear, which is making its professional world premiere, is about British mathematician and code breaker Alan Turing, as told from the viewpoint of his teddy bear. Neal Bell's Somewhere in the Pacific focuses on a unit of Marines aboard a Navy transport ship at the end of World War II. The third production is a bill of short plays: Edward Albee's satire of family life, The American Dream, and two works by Harold Pinter -- the American premiere of his short curtain-raiser, Press Conference, and One for the Road, about the interrogation and torture of a family by a government official in a totalitarian state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
In Harold Pinter's “The Caretaker,” men who seem to have empty centers where their hearts should be engage in a strange dance involving intimidation and entitlement. In David Mamet's “Glengarry Glen Ross,” which the playwright dedicated to Pinter, men with voids where their morals should be thrash about in a desperate game that also involves intimidation and entitlement. These are two very different works, to be sure, but they share some gritty elements, pose similarly tough questions about human nature, and leave us with similarly elusive answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The time-worn 1960s London residence where Harold Pinter's "The Homecoming" takes place contains a family that puts the "dys-" in dysfunctional. A surprise visit by a long-absent son with a wife no one knows about merely causes the already claustrophobic world to close in more tightly, threatening everyone under the roof, one way or another. The 1965 play, which has been given a thoughtful, generally impressive production by Center Stage , can still provoke, confuse and offend — and amuse, for that matter.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2005
After two contemporary plays - Harold Pinter's Betrayal and Beth Henley's Crimes of the Heart - Bay Theatre Company closes its season with George Bernard Shaw's Arms and the Man. Although Shaw's subject of love and war remains current, his 1894 play presents challenges to the company and to the audience. This dialogue-heavy play may present problems to audiences not familiar with Shaw. His admirers will recognize how relevant the playwright's Victorians remain today. Set in Bulgaria during an 1885 war with Austria, Arms and the Man satirizes Victorian society's rigid prescribed behavior and attitudes toward love and war, especially the foolishness of romanticizing war. This work is not easy to produce on Bay Theatre's small stage.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
When Harold Pinter was a teenager in post-World War II England, he was threatened every day by a gang of boys who lurked in the rough London neighborhood of Hackney. "They were holding broken milk bottles," says Pinter scholar Steven Gale. "He wore glasses and he was carrying a pile of books. To them, he either was a Jew or a communist, and they didn't care which it was. He had to talk his way past them every day. Never once did he get hurt." Pinter, who turned 75 on Monday, hasn't stopped talking since.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
During a skit in "The Second City Does Baltimore," the hit show at Center Stage , cast member Megan Wilkins pops out sporting a thick New York accent and a thicker wig to announce the pending premiere of "The Wire: The Musical. " Hometown audiences quickly recognize the target of the impersonation — Irene Lewis, whose colorful, if not universally admired, tenure as Center Stage artistic director is drawing to a close after 20 years. Not surprisingly, Lewis has an opinion about the portrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
During a skit in "The Second City Does Baltimore," the hit show at Center Stage , cast member Megan Wilkins pops out sporting a thick New York accent and a thicker wig to announce the pending premiere of "The Wire: The Musical. " Hometown audiences quickly recognize the target of the impersonation — Irene Lewis, whose colorful, if not universally admired, tenure as Center Stage artistic director is drawing to a close after 20 years. Not surprisingly, Lewis has an opinion about the portrayal.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
When Harold Pinter was a teenager in post-World War II England, he was threatened every day by a gang of boys who lurked in the rough London neighborhood of Hackney. "They were holding broken milk bottles," says Pinter scholar Steven Gale. "He wore glasses and he was carrying a pile of books. To them, he either was a Jew or a communist, and they didn't care which it was. He had to talk his way past them every day. Never once did he get hurt." Pinter, who turned 75 on Monday, hasn't stopped talking since.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2005
Political fare For its summer residency of politically charged plays, the Potomac Theatre Project is presenting three productions in repertory through Aug. 7 at Olney Theatre Center. Snoo Wilson's Lovesong of the Electric Bear, which is making its professional world premiere, is about British mathematician and code breaker Alan Turing, as told from the viewpoint of his teddy bear. Neal Bell's Somewhere in the Pacific focuses on a unit of Marines aboard a Navy transport ship at the end of World War II. The third production is a bill of short plays: Edward Albee's satire of family life, The American Dream, and two works by Harold Pinter -- the American premiere of his short curtain-raiser, Press Conference, and One for the Road, about the interrogation and torture of a family by a government official in a totalitarian state.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2005
After two contemporary plays - Harold Pinter's Betrayal and Beth Henley's Crimes of the Heart - Bay Theatre Company closes its season with George Bernard Shaw's Arms and the Man. Although Shaw's subject of love and war remains current, his 1894 play presents challenges to the company and to the audience. This dialogue-heavy play may present problems to audiences not familiar with Shaw. His admirers will recognize how relevant the playwright's Victorians remain today. Set in Bulgaria during an 1885 war with Austria, Arms and the Man satirizes Victorian society's rigid prescribed behavior and attitudes toward love and war, especially the foolishness of romanticizing war. This work is not easy to produce on Bay Theatre's small stage.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2005
Bay Theatre Company continues its third season with Harold Pinter's Betrayal - the company's seventh play and the fifth in its intimate 90-seat West Garrett Place playhouse at 275 West St. At a recent rehearsal, Bay Theatre founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby described Betrayal as one of Pinter's more accessible works. Betrayal tells the story of Emma, a woman who has an affair with her husband's best friend, Jerry. The play opens at the end of the affair and works backward. Along the way it illustrates the power of deceit and willful blindness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 1, 2001
`Bye Bye Birdie' opens Olney Theatre season Olney Theatre Center opens its 2001 season tomorrow with "Bye Bye Birdie," the 1961 Adams and Strouse musical about a rock and roll star and his effect on the teens in small-town America. Continuing the practice instituted two seasons ago, the season opener showcases young musical-theater performers from the Washington area. Here's the rest of the Olney main-stage season: "The Rivals," by Richard Brinsley Sheridan (April 17-May 20); "Art," by Yasmina Reza (June 5-July 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 16, 1997
Performance Workshop Theatre Company will present an evening of short plays by Harold Pinter titled, "The Portable Pinter," at Fells Point Corner Theatre beginning tonight.The half-dozen comedies, which include the American premiere of "Special Offer," share the common theme of examining the communication gap. Marc Horwitz directs a cast that includes Allan Dale III, Joy Ehrlich, Katherine Lyons, Marlyn Robinson, Joseph Valadez, Martha Watt and Horwitz himself.Show times at Fells Point Corner, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, with matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays, through Oct. 26. Tickets are $10 and $11. Call 410-659-7830.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 24, 2007
Referring to betrayal, a character in Harold Pinter's play of that name comments, "Not much more to say on that subject." Maybe not, but the Nobel Prize-winning playwright certainly found a different way to say it. Betrayal, Pinter's 1978 chronicle of a romantic triangle -- a husband, his wife and his oldest friend -- unfolds in reverse, moving from the postmortem of the affair to its instigation. If you go Betrayal runs through June 24 at Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St. Tickets: $18-$30.
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