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By William Grimes and William Grimes,New York Times News Service | January 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The cinema celebrates its 100th birthday next year, but Hal Roach got there first.The man who paired Laurel with Hardy, put black glasses on Harold Lloyd and cranked out more than 200 Our Gang comedies began his second century last week, and tonight the Smithsonian Resident Associate Program will honor him at the National Museum of Natural History here.The evening's events will include screenings of "The Pip From Pittsburgh," a 1931 Charlie Chase comedy, and "Helpmates," a 1932 Laurel and Hardy classic.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
They live on the same floor of the same Massachusetts nursing home now - the 94-year-old former Rose Popolo; her 85-year-old sister, Sadie Bell; their 83-year-old brother, Frank Popolo, and his 90-year-old wife, Aunt Genie - so I get to see them all in a single visit. On a recent Saturday evening, I coax all but Aunt Genie, who's asleep in her room, down the hall to a faux-Colonial sitting room. I pull up chairs. We sit. We talk. My mother is quiet, but she's smiling. She's very happy about the pizza I just delivered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 20, 2003
One of filmdom's greatest comedic actors, too-long absent from our cinematic consciousness, is getting a welcome showcase on Turner Classic Movies this month. Harold Lloyd was once one of Hollywood's biggest stars, for a time even more popular than Charlie Chaplin. His everyman character, complete with straw hat, prominent black eyeglasses and an expression that would shift (sometimes within moments) from befuddlement to exasperation to joy, left silent-film audiences roaring. Even today, as modern filmgoers have forgotten how to watch movies sans dialogue, his daredevil acrobatics, his elaborate car chases and his relentless good humor and resourcefulness haven't lost their ability to delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 20, 2003
One of filmdom's greatest comedic actors, too-long absent from our cinematic consciousness, is getting a welcome showcase on Turner Classic Movies this month. Harold Lloyd was once one of Hollywood's biggest stars, for a time even more popular than Charlie Chaplin. His everyman character, complete with straw hat, prominent black eyeglasses and an expression that would shift (sometimes within moments) from befuddlement to exasperation to joy, left silent-film audiences roaring. Even today, as modern filmgoers have forgotten how to watch movies sans dialogue, his daredevil acrobatics, his elaborate car chases and his relentless good humor and resourcefulness haven't lost their ability to delight.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
The majority of the action tonight is in the nonfiction area. ABC's "Turning Point" and CBS' "48 Hours" fight for viewers in prime time, while independent TV and cable offerings include biographical portraits of Oskar Schindler, Harold Lloyd and Elvis Presley.* "Turning Point" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Last week it was Charles Manson and company, in a "Turning Point" hour that profiled some of the killers on a murder spree. This week it was supposed to be a profile of the victims of a killer on a murder spree in Gainesville, Fla. (what range; what variety)
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
They live on the same floor of the same Massachusetts nursing home now - the 94-year-old former Rose Popolo; her 85-year-old sister, Sadie Bell; their 83-year-old brother, Frank Popolo, and his 90-year-old wife, Aunt Genie - so I get to see them all in a single visit. On a recent Saturday evening, I coax all but Aunt Genie, who's asleep in her room, down the hall to a faux-Colonial sitting room. I pull up chairs. We sit. We talk. My mother is quiet, but she's smiling. She's very happy about the pizza I just delivered.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
Think you're ready to out-police the police? Check out CBS tonight."JAG" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Harm (David James Elliott) ticks off Mac (Catherine Bell) by suggesting she's letting her personal feelings get in the way of her job, which is defending an admitted wife-abuser charged with murdering his wife's boyfriend. Plot contrivance: Harm's prosecuting the case. CBS."Cold Case" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Think you can do better than the police? That's the idea here, as viewers are introduced to three unsolved murders, provided with all sorts of evidence and other materials (both via the show and an Internet Web site, www.coldcase.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
Two years ago, anti-tax crusaders carried the banner of Roger B. Hayden, the unheralded and underfinanced candidate for Baltimore county executive, and directed their ire at incumbent Dennis F. Rasmussen, whom they derisively dubbed, "Tax-mussen."Oh, how times have changed.Swept into office in the anti-tax fervor of 1990, Mr. Hayden now finds himself the frequent target of the tax protest movement that helped get him elected. This week in Towson, at his monthly face-to-face session with the public, about a dozen members of Property Taxpayers United marched outside the county office building, carrying signs that read, "Hayden betrayed us" and "Hayden is History."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
Now that the dust has settled, the American Film Institute's canonization of the "greatest 100 American movies of all time" has inspired a few random observations:United Artists - This studio was responsible for the most titles on the list - 18. Formed in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. as a refuge from the predations of exploitative studios, UA stayed true to its mission throughout economic busts and booms...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
As the American Film Institute's recently released Top 100 list showed, there's plenty of competition when it comes to naming the greatest American movie ever. And it's a sure bet that competition for the title of greatest actor, actress or director would be just as fierce.But when it comes to the greatest year for American films, there's no disputing the champion - 1939 was such a banner year for Hollywood ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," "Intermezzo," "The Women," "Gunga Din," "Stagecoach," "Ninotchka," "Destry Rides Again," "Wuthering Heights")
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 7, 2003
SUN SCORE **1/2 As the reluctant cowboy hero known as "the Shanghai Kid" or Chon Wang (pronounced "John Wayne"), Jackie Chan has developed a warm, mellow ruefulness that humanizes both his own outlandish stunts and Owen Wilson's drawling, satiric slacker mannerisms as inept gunslinger Roy O'Bannon. In Shanghai Knights, Chan keeps earning our good will even when the material is beneath him. This sequel to Shanghai Noon takes the East-West odd couple to London in search of the man who killed Wang's father.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
As the American Film Institute's recently released Top 100 list showed, there's plenty of competition when it comes to naming the greatest American movie ever. And it's a sure bet that competition for the title of greatest actor, actress or director would be just as fierce.But when it comes to the greatest year for American films, there's no disputing the champion - 1939 was such a banner year for Hollywood ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," "Intermezzo," "The Women," "Gunga Din," "Stagecoach," "Ninotchka," "Destry Rides Again," "Wuthering Heights")
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
Now that the dust has settled, the American Film Institute's canonization of the "greatest 100 American movies of all time" has inspired a few random observations:United Artists - This studio was responsible for the most titles on the list - 18. Formed in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. as a refuge from the predations of exploitative studios, UA stayed true to its mission throughout economic busts and booms...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
Think you're ready to out-police the police? Check out CBS tonight."JAG" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Harm (David James Elliott) ticks off Mac (Catherine Bell) by suggesting she's letting her personal feelings get in the way of her job, which is defending an admitted wife-abuser charged with murdering his wife's boyfriend. Plot contrivance: Harm's prosecuting the case. CBS."Cold Case" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Think you can do better than the police? That's the idea here, as viewers are introduced to three unsolved murders, provided with all sorts of evidence and other materials (both via the show and an Internet Web site, www.coldcase.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
The majority of the action tonight is in the nonfiction area. ABC's "Turning Point" and CBS' "48 Hours" fight for viewers in prime time, while independent TV and cable offerings include biographical portraits of Oskar Schindler, Harold Lloyd and Elvis Presley.* "Turning Point" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Last week it was Charles Manson and company, in a "Turning Point" hour that profiled some of the killers on a murder spree. This week it was supposed to be a profile of the victims of a killer on a murder spree in Gainesville, Fla. (what range; what variety)
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
Two years ago, anti-tax crusaders carried the banner of Roger B. Hayden, the unheralded and underfinanced candidate for Baltimore county executive, and directed their ire at incumbent Dennis F. Rasmussen, whom they derisively dubbed, "Tax-mussen."Oh, how times have changed.Swept into office in the anti-tax fervor of 1990, Mr. Hayden now finds himself the frequent target of the tax protest movement that helped get him elected. This week in Towson, at his monthly face-to-face session with the public, about a dozen members of Property Taxpayers United marched outside the county office building, carrying signs that read, "Hayden betrayed us" and "Hayden is History."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 7, 2003
SUN SCORE **1/2 As the reluctant cowboy hero known as "the Shanghai Kid" or Chon Wang (pronounced "John Wayne"), Jackie Chan has developed a warm, mellow ruefulness that humanizes both his own outlandish stunts and Owen Wilson's drawling, satiric slacker mannerisms as inept gunslinger Roy O'Bannon. In Shanghai Knights, Chan keeps earning our good will even when the material is beneath him. This sequel to Shanghai Noon takes the East-West odd couple to London in search of the man who killed Wang's father.
FEATURES
February 19, 2007
Screening Catch `Speedy' Speedy, a 1928 silent comedy that watches as Harold Lloyd tries to save the last horse-drawn streetcar in New York, will be shown tonight - with live musical accompaniment by the three-piece Alloy Orchestra - at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road. Even Babe Ruth shows up in the film. Doors open at 6:45; screening is at 7:30. Free admission. Call 410-435-8338 or visit senator.com.
FEATURES
By William Grimes and William Grimes,New York Times News Service | January 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The cinema celebrates its 100th birthday next year, but Hal Roach got there first.The man who paired Laurel with Hardy, put black glasses on Harold Lloyd and cranked out more than 200 Our Gang comedies began his second century last week, and tonight the Smithsonian Resident Associate Program will honor him at the National Museum of Natural History here.The evening's events will include screenings of "The Pip From Pittsburgh," a 1931 Charlie Chase comedy, and "Helpmates," a 1932 Laurel and Hardy classic.
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