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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 27, 2006
In The Music Man, the mayor of River City, Iowa, denigrates the con artist Harold Hill by labeling him a "spellbinder." But Meredith Willson's entire musical can work a spell on an audience as well. How else to explain why this show won the 1958 Tony Award over the groundbreaking West Side Story? At Cockpit in Court, director Roy Hammond has a fair Harold Hill in actor Ken Kemp, but the production as a whole is more lackluster than spellbinding. The show gets off to a good start with a train full of traveling salesmen chanting the patter number, "Rock Island," in locomotive rhythm.
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May 3, 2013
Students at West Middle School will perform Meredith Willson's “ Music Man, Junior” this weekend a t the West Middle School Auditorium, 60 Monroe St., Westminster. Performances are Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 4 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at the West Middle Box Office. “Music Man Junior” is the story of 'Professor' Harold Hill, a traveling salesman who comes to a small town in Iowa hoping to make his fortune by selling his music and band equipment to the area's youth.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | June 18, 1993
Of the great musicals, "Les Miserables" may be the most spectacular; "My Fair Lady," the most sophisticated; and "Oklahoma," the most extravagantly tuneful.But for my money, the cleverest of them all is Meredith Wilson's classic "The Music Man," which is playing at the Summer Garden Theatre at the Annapolis City Dock.The wonderful story of the fly-by-night salesman who bamboozles an entire Iowa town into supporting his nonexistent marching band is a remarkable, inventive affair containing some of Broadway's most memorable melodies and the snappiest patter this side of Gilbert and Sullivan.
NEWS
By Sara Trapnell and Sara Trapnell,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
"The fella sells bands. Kids' bands. I don't know how he does it!" Recently, the students at River Hill High School showed us how in their marvelous production of The Music Man. The musical takes place in 1912 and tells the story of a traveling salesman, Harold Hill, and his attempts to con stubborn Iowans in River City into forming a kids' band with Hill as conductor. Little do the townspeople know that Hill can't read a note of music. The sly and crafty character fools them all into buying their children the works -- instruments, music books and even uniforms.
NEWS
By Sara Trapnell and Sara Trapnell,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
"The fella sells bands. Kids' bands. I don't know how he does it!" Recently, the students at River Hill High School showed us how in their marvelous production of The Music Man. The musical takes place in 1912 and tells the story of a traveling salesman, Harold Hill, and his attempts to con stubborn Iowans in River City into forming a kids' band with Hill as conductor. Little do the townspeople know that Hill can't read a note of music. The sly and crafty character fools them all into buying their children the works -- instruments, music books and even uniforms.
EXPLORE
May 3, 2013
Students at West Middle School will perform Meredith Willson's “ Music Man, Junior” this weekend a t the West Middle School Auditorium, 60 Monroe St., Westminster. Performances are Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 4 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at the West Middle Box Office. “Music Man Junior” is the story of 'Professor' Harold Hill, a traveling salesman who comes to a small town in Iowa hoping to make his fortune by selling his music and band equipment to the area's youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 25, 2001
If patriotism is what you're looking for this holiday season -- as many of us are -- then you might want to take in The Music Man, which opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday. Set in 1912, the Meredith Willson musical begins on the Fourth of July when con artist Harold Hill (Gerritt VanderMeer) arrives in River City, Iowa, claiming he can transform the town's youngsters into a first-class marching band. The touring production features the choreography created by Susan Stroman for the current Broadway revival.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 29, 2001
Con artists are naturally theatrical characters. They turn people into suckers by selling them a song and a dance. And yet, Meredith Willson's The Music Man always has seemed too squeaky clean an account of the flimflam trade. The touring production at the Mechanic Theatre won't convince you otherwise. In place of dramatic conflict and whiz-bang spectacle, it delivers a dose of Americana. Of course, a dose of Americana is pretty welcome these days, but this one is a bit bland. If The Music Man is as American as apple pie, then this production is the off-the-shelf, Mrs. Smith's variety.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
Every time I run across a good production of Meredith Willson's classic Broadway show The Music Man, I marvel anew at the stunning originality of the piece. Willson's melodic sleight-of-hand allows the same tune to flip-flop between the rousing "76 Trombones" and the lyrical "Goodnight My Someone." A songful mother-daughter exchange evolves ingeniously out of a little girl's piano exercise, a dysfunctional school board mutates magically into a barbershop quartet and, of course, there's all that whiz-bang patter from the mouth of "Professor" Harold Hill, the fly-by-night huckster who passes himself off as a band director though he can't tell the "Minute Waltz" from a minute steak.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | September 17, 1993
For 19 years, Arnie Hayes has celebrated his birthday by putting on a musical play for the benefit of Carroll County's developmentally disabled citizens.Tomorrow, September Song begins its 20th production.This year, the theater troupe will perform Meredith Willson's "The Music Man," first produced by the group in 1983.Show times are at 8 p.m. tomorrow and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Westminster High School, 1225 Washington Road. Show time will be 8 p.m. Sept. 24 and 25."I always wanted to put on a musical -- I have a mentally retarded sister and wanted to do something for her -- and Bob Kersey offered to get me an orchestra if I could put together something," Mr. Hayes said.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 27, 2006
In The Music Man, the mayor of River City, Iowa, denigrates the con artist Harold Hill by labeling him a "spellbinder." But Meredith Willson's entire musical can work a spell on an audience as well. How else to explain why this show won the 1958 Tony Award over the groundbreaking West Side Story? At Cockpit in Court, director Roy Hammond has a fair Harold Hill in actor Ken Kemp, but the production as a whole is more lackluster than spellbinding. The show gets off to a good start with a train full of traveling salesmen chanting the patter number, "Rock Island," in locomotive rhythm.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
Every time I run across a good production of Meredith Willson's classic Broadway show The Music Man, I marvel anew at the stunning originality of the piece. Willson's melodic sleight-of-hand allows the same tune to flip-flop between the rousing "76 Trombones" and the lyrical "Goodnight My Someone." A songful mother-daughter exchange evolves ingeniously out of a little girl's piano exercise, a dysfunctional school board mutates magically into a barbershop quartet and, of course, there's all that whiz-bang patter from the mouth of "Professor" Harold Hill, the fly-by-night huckster who passes himself off as a band director though he can't tell the "Minute Waltz" from a minute steak.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 29, 2001
Con artists are naturally theatrical characters. They turn people into suckers by selling them a song and a dance. And yet, Meredith Willson's The Music Man always has seemed too squeaky clean an account of the flimflam trade. The touring production at the Mechanic Theatre won't convince you otherwise. In place of dramatic conflict and whiz-bang spectacle, it delivers a dose of Americana. Of course, a dose of Americana is pretty welcome these days, but this one is a bit bland. If The Music Man is as American as apple pie, then this production is the off-the-shelf, Mrs. Smith's variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 25, 2001
If patriotism is what you're looking for this holiday season -- as many of us are -- then you might want to take in The Music Man, which opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday. Set in 1912, the Meredith Willson musical begins on the Fourth of July when con artist Harold Hill (Gerritt VanderMeer) arrives in River City, Iowa, claiming he can transform the town's youngsters into a first-class marching band. The touring production features the choreography created by Susan Stroman for the current Broadway revival.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | September 17, 1993
For 19 years, Arnie Hayes has celebrated his birthday by putting on a musical play for the benefit of Carroll County's developmentally disabled citizens.Tomorrow, September Song begins its 20th production.This year, the theater troupe will perform Meredith Willson's "The Music Man," first produced by the group in 1983.Show times are at 8 p.m. tomorrow and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Westminster High School, 1225 Washington Road. Show time will be 8 p.m. Sept. 24 and 25."I always wanted to put on a musical -- I have a mentally retarded sister and wanted to do something for her -- and Bob Kersey offered to get me an orchestra if I could put together something," Mr. Hayes said.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | June 18, 1993
Of the great musicals, "Les Miserables" may be the most spectacular; "My Fair Lady," the most sophisticated; and "Oklahoma," the most extravagantly tuneful.But for my money, the cleverest of them all is Meredith Wilson's classic "The Music Man," which is playing at the Summer Garden Theatre at the Annapolis City Dock.The wonderful story of the fly-by-night salesman who bamboozles an entire Iowa town into supporting his nonexistent marching band is a remarkable, inventive affair containing some of Broadway's most memorable melodies and the snappiest patter this side of Gilbert and Sullivan.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
John Carroll School's Patriot Players will present the musical "Music Man" on Sunday, Feb. 24, and Friday through Sunday, March 1 to 3, at the school, 703 Churchville Road in Bel Air.Friday and Saturdayperformances are scheduled to begin at 8 p.m., while the Sunday showis set for 7 p.m.Heading the cast is Brian Vollmer as Harold Hill. Meli Mullin will portray Marian Paroo, Courtney Reiter will play Mrs. Paroo, and Dave Callan will be seen in the role of Marcellus Washburn.Reservations: 838-8333 or 879-2480 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
NEWS
November 2, 1994
Swaran Singh, 87, foreign minister of India when it backed East Pakistan's breaking away from West Pakistan to form Bangladesh, died Sunday in New Delhi, where he lived. A Sikh from Punjab province in northwestern India, he was foreign minister from 1964 to 1966 and from 1970 to 1974.Sir John Pope-Hennessy, 80, one of the world's leading authorities on Italian Renaissance work, died Monday at his home in Florence, Italian television reported. His many books include studies of Sienese painting, and Renaissance artists Uccello and Fra Angelico.
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