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By Peter Schmuck | September 12, 1990
Manager Frank Robinson called Pete Harnisch into his office before last night's game, leaving room to wonder if there would soon be a change in the Baltimore Orioles starting rotation.Robinson had hinted at it the night before, but Harnisch apparently talked him out of it."You'll see him in his next turn," Robinson said.Harnisch admitted that he is feeling the effects of a long season, but convinced his manager that there is nothing to worry about. He wants to keep going out there, tired arm or not, and Robinson is going to go along with it for the time being.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
Boston Red Sox star Curt Schilling laughs when he thinks about the morning he found out he was no longer an Oriole. It was a career ago, and he was a naive, 24-year-old kid who really didn't know what had hit him. "I remember it clearly," Schilling said. "I was sitting at home, eating breakfast with my wife - my girlfriend then - and [then-Orioles general manager] Roland Hemond called. He said, `Kid, I just wanted to let you know that we made a trade today.' "I thought that was pretty cool, calling me like that.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 16, 1990
TORONTO -- Right-hander Pete Harnisch apparently knew what he was talking about. Last week he talked manager Frank Robinson out of removing him from the starting rotation, and yesterday he came back with a strong performance against the Toronto Blue Jays.Harnisch pitched eight innings and gave up three runs on seven hits, but two of those runs crossed the plate on the game-winning three-run homer that reliever Curt Schilling gave up to Kelly Gruber in the ninth."These guys are a very aggressive team, so you've got to make your pitches," said Harnisch, whose 11th victory disappeared along with the 2-0 fastball that Gruber sent over the left-field fence.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Give Cincinnati Reds manager Jim Bowden credit for one thing. He isn't afraid to pull the plug on an uncertain season. The Reds have been inching their way back toward the top of the National League Central standings, but the organization obviously has decided to refocus on the future. The trade that sent pitching ace Denny Neagle to the New York Yankees was just the first in what promises to be a series of moves to unload veteran talent before the July 31 deadline for making deals without waivers.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | November 24, 1993
Big game free-agent hunting could be over for the Orioles, but it's still open season on the trade market. And the rumor mill never stops grinding.Shut out in their effort to obtain Will Clark, and uncertain of the stakes in their pursuit of Rafael Palmeiro, the Orioles appear intent on building a starting rotation that could be as formidable as any in baseball. That effort didn't end with the signing of free-agent left-hander Sid Fernandez two days ago.Sources said yesterday that the Orioles are close to completing a deal for either of two right-handers -- Pete Harnisch of the Houston Astros or Andy Benes of the San Diego Padres.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1990
The question of the night was whether Pete Harnisch would remain in the Orioles' starting rotation. Manager Frank Robinson sighed before providing the inevitable answer. "Anything around here is a possibility," he said.Harnisch, 23, has worked a club-high 173 2/3 innings, including six in last night's 8-0 loss to Detroit. His record is below .500 for the first time this season, and his inconsistent second half has Robinson thinking his arm might be tired."I worry about all my young pitchers pitching a full season," Robinson said, knowing this is Harnisch's first full year in the majors.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | September 26, 1991
Roland Hemond bounded out of the Orioles' suite at the winter meetings, thinking he had a deal. Pete Harnisch for Phil Plantier. Young pitcher for promising slugger. Hemond was so excited, he nearly burst unannounced into the Boston Red Sox's cluster of rooms.Instead, he was intercepted by Lou Gorman, his fellow general manager and longtime acquaintance from Rhode Island. Gorman said he needed to obtain final approval from the Red Sox executives gathered inside. Soon after, he gave Hemond the news.
SPORTS
By Russ White and Russ White,Orlando Sentinel | February 26, 1991
KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- Pete Harnisch hasn't had batting practice in seven years, since he was a senior in high school, so he thoroughly enjoyed slugging a couple of inside fastballs over the leftfield fence Sunday at the Houston Astros' training facility.Harnisch, 24, fussed at himself when he didn't handle some other pitches."It's been a while," he said. "I'm going to need some time, a lot of extra work in the cages, even hitting a ball off a tee."Harnisch, 24, a sturdy righthanded pitcher who was 11-11 with a 4.34 ERA for Baltimore last year, came to the Astros in the trade that sent first baseman Glenn Davis to the Orioles.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 10, 1991
TORONTO -- Someone asked Pete Harnisch if he had been walking the short distance between his hotel and SkyDome the past few days. Harnisch smiled. He knew this was coming. "Yeah,"he said yesterday, pointing to his feet, "and I'm wearing shoes with steel-plated heels."That was what he needed on the last weekend of the 1989 season, of course, when he stepped on a nail walking home from a game and had to scratch from the biggest start of his career. He was 22 and pitching for the Orioles, who were two games behind Toronto with two to play.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | May 21, 1991
The other half of the Glenn Davis trade is living well.While Davis is rehabilitating from the nerve injury that has kept him on the disabled list for nearly a month, the three former Baltimore Orioles swapped for him are pitching and playing regularly, learning about the National League and enjoying where they are."The trade is past us," said outfielder Steve Finley, who joined the Houston Astros with pitchers Pete Harnisch and Curt Schilling on Jan. 10. "We still keep up with the Orioles because we have friends in Baltimore, but we're concentrating on our new surroundings."
SPORTS
April 29, 2000
Quote: "That's the way they play this game. When you don't do good, they put somebody in your spot." -- third baseman Aramis Ramirez, who was optioned by the Pirates to Triple-A Nashville after hitting .180 and making four errors It's a fact: On the same day fellow "Nasty Boy" Norm Charlton was released by the Reds, former reliever Rob Dibble led the singing of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" at Wrigley Field. Who's hot: Cardinals' Fernando Tatis has a 13-game hitting streak. Who's not: The Reds' Pete Harnisch has given up six homers in 25 innings.
SPORTS
May 31, 1998
HittingMickey Morandini, Cubs: 4-for-5, double.Brad Fullmer, Expos: 5 RBIs, grand slam.Kevin Young, Pirates: 4-for-4, double.PitchingL Pete Harnisch, Reds: 7 innings, 1 run, 6 hits, 9 strikeouts.Pub Date: 5/31/98
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1997
MILWAUKEE -- Maybe it's just too difficult to get excited about a couple of minnows when bigger fish are swimming up stream. Or maybe that's letting the Orioles off the hook too easily.One night after being beaten in Toronto and with the Division Series fast approaching, the Orioles reeled in another defeat last night, done in by two of their former pitchers and their apparent lack of interest in a 4-2 loss to the Milwaukee Brewers before 16,834 at County Stadium.The Orioles (96-64) had hoped to make a hard charge toward the postseason with three games each at Toronto and Milwaukee, but find themselves 8-13 since Sept.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | November 30, 1994
The Orioles brought in Julio Franco for a physical yesterday, but don't expect general manager Roland Hemond to start singing "Me and Julio Down by the Ballyard" anytime soon.By next week, the Orioles will be nearly $2.5 million over the salary cap. By next week, Ben McDonald and Chris Hoiles will be restricted free agents. By next week, the only thing Hemond will be singing is the blues.It's coming, it's all coming. Federal mediator William J. Usery is useless. Yesterday's negotiations in Leesburg, Va., were pointless.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
PLANT CITY, Fla. -- The Orioles have a better idea of what is wrong with left-hander Sid Fernandez's sore shoulder today, but they still cannot say with any certainty when he'll return to the starting rotation.Medical tests performed in Baltimore yesterday showed that Fernandez is suffering from bursitis and will be sidelined at least until late April."He has been told to remain idle for two weeks," said general manager Roland Hemond, "then he'll be re-evaluated. It's not the worst news by any means.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 18, 1994
SARASOTA, Fla. -- San Diego general manager Randy Smith says the Padres will keep Andy Benes. Houston GM Bob Watson says the Astros will keep Pete Harnisch.That's bad news for the Orioles, whose starting rotation might be only the third best in the five-team AL East, behind New York and Boston.The addition of Benes or Harnisch would make them the clear division favorite, but the way Smith and Watson are talking, the possibility of landing either premier right-hander is slim.Indeed, even if one of the GMs shifts course, the Orioles would face stiff competition for Benes or Harnisch from their two chief division rivals -- New York and Toronto.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | September 23, 1990
If Pete Harnisch could see it happening all over again, he wasn't going to admit it. He had watched a strong performance go to waste in Toronto last week when Curt Schilling gave up a three-run home run in the ninth inning. Now another victory was on the line and Gregg Olson was struggling in the ninth."I was never worried," said Harnisch, who was watching the final inning on a video monitor in the clubhouse.The Milwaukee Brewers threatened to make up a four-run deficit, but Olson restored order just in time and the Baltimore Orioles held on for a 5-3 victory on Fireworks Night at Memorial Stadium Friday night.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | September 22, 1990
If Pete Harnisch could see it happening all over again, he wasn't going to admit it. He had watched a strong performance go to waste in Toronto last week when Curt Schilling gave up a three-run home run in the ninth inning. Now another victory was on the line and Gregg Olson was struggling in the ninth."I was never worried," said Harnisch, who was watching the final inning on a video monitor in the clubhouse.The Milwaukee Brewers threatened to make up a four-run deficit, but Olson restored order just in time and the Baltimore Orioles held on for a 5-3 victory on Fireworks Night at Memorial Stadium.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
Now that they have added Chris Sabo to the lineup, the Orioles will return their attention to bolstering their pitching staff.His lineup revamped by the addition of Sabo and Rafael Palmeiro and the starting rotation fortified by the acquisition of Sid Fernandez, manager Johnny Oates likes what he sees, but still wants more.fTC "We can still use more defensive and pitching depth," he said.And, while not ruling out another trade for a starter, the pitching depth the Orioles seek could be provided by some familiar names.
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