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NEWS
September 27, 1990
Maryland's harness-racing industry is on the brink -- through no fault of its own. Because the state legislature and Maryland Racing Commission have permitted a monopolistic situation to develop, horsemen and track workers are holding their breath, awaiting the outcome of track owner Mark R. Vogel's criminal and business calamities.Mr. Vogel, a wealthy real estate developer in the Washington suburbs, has been charged in Virginia with cocaine possession as part of a federal probe of politically connected lawyers and developers in Prince George's County.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Penn National Gaming Inc.and the Cloverleaf Standardbred Owners Association have agreed to a two-year contract extension that would keep live harness racing at Rosecroft Raceway in Prince George's County only if the General Assembly denies a casino license for nearby National Harbor, the company announced Tuesday. Penn National would like to see Rosecroft chosen as the site for a sixth gambling location in Maryland, but the site faces stiff competition from backers of the National Harbor location.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
The operators of several off-track betting parlors appeared before the Maryland Racing Commission yesterday to request more thoroughbred racing at night to boost their operations."
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
Like many horse racing tracks across the country, the Ocean Downs harness track on the Eastern Shore is hemorrhaging money. It lost an average of $2 million annually for the past five years. Ocean Downs' owner, William Rickman, wants the state's help. He is pushing a bill, scheduled for consideration Wednesday by a Senate committee, that would allow the state's two harness tracks to keep using a share of the purse money generated from Maryland's casinos to support daily racing operations.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
CORDOVA - When racing officials created the Old Saint Nick Pace just before Christmas at Rosecroft Raceway, they limited the race to horses at least 10 years old. The intention was to showcase a local celebrity named Romanoble, a 14-year-old warhorse making his 353rd - and final - start. The old boy was being forced out to pasture. Harness racing requires mandatory retirement for horses at the end of their 14th year. Romanoble would turn 15 on Jan. 1, the official birthday of all racehorses.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | February 14, 2005
Rainbow Blue, the Maryland-born pacing filly, was named standardbred Horse of the Year last night at harness racing's annual awards ceremony at Caesars Atlantic City, N.J. Stabled at Harrington Raceway in Delaware, Rainbow Blue, who was 3 last year, won 20 of 21 races and edged Windsong's Legacy, who won trotting's Triple Crown, in voting for harness racing's highest honor. Rainbow Blue is the second straight standardbred Horse of the Year bred by Winbak Farm in Cecil County. The Winbak-bred No Pan Intended won Horse of the Year last year.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Special to The Sun | April 3, 1991
The date of the Graduate Pacing Series at Rosecrof Raceway was reported incorrectly in The Sun yesterday. The races will be run Saturday night.FORT WASHINGTON -- Harness racing's "traveling road show" comes to Rosecroft Raceway tomorrow night in the form of the Graduate Pacing Series.Two races for older horses, each worth $56,250, will be contested.The first division, which will be the sixth race, will be headed by Dorunrun Bluegrass, voted the top older pacer of 1990. The 5-year-old will be guided by Herve Filion, harness racing's all-time leading driver.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | December 7, 1991
FORT WASHINGTON -- Former major-league baseball All-Star John "The Count" Montefusco, who has begun a career in harness racing, drove in six races at Rosecroft Raceway last night.His best official finish came in the fifth race behind the pacer Loving, which finished second to favored winner Maracibou after Loving was boxed in most of the stretch.Montefusco finished first in one race, but the pacer Ben Erie took racing room away from rivals in the stretch and was disqualified.
NEWS
May 21, 1995
It is a cynical squeeze-play concocted at the last minute to create havoc in Maryland's racing industry and pave the way for casino gambling in this state. And it just might work.Here's what's happened. Maryland's two harness-racing tracks, Rosecroft and Delmarva, are on the verge of bankruptcy. The estate of its deceased owner has the tracks up for sale. The state's 1,400 standardbred owners and trainers, through their Cloverleaf Association, has made a novel suggestion to purchase the two tracks, slowly pay off the debts and keep for themselves any profits through higher purses on races.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | June 4, 1991
The sale of Rosecroft Raceway and Delmarva Downs was approved yesterday by trustee Jim Murphy, signaling a likely end to a stormy chapter in Maryland harness racing history.Murphy, trustee of the tracks since they were placed under the protection of a federal bankruptcy court in January, approved an $18.2 million bid by Colt Enterprises Inc., a company fully owned by Frederick Weisman of California."The proposal will be subject to the federal bankruptcy court for approval," Murphy said in a prepared statement.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
The Ocean Downs harness race track will open for the first time in two years on Saturday, featuring qualifying races for the 40-day meet that begins June 19, with racing each Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday through Aug. 28. "We're very excited about the return of racing," said track general manager Peter Szymanski. "Construction of the casino and improvements to the race track took precedence and we elected to go without racing. When people come now they will see an improved facility, improved grandstands, a new HD toteboard, benches and refreshment stands.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
With Maryland's racing industry still on shaky ground, longtime racing commission member John Franzone is spearheading efforts to bring various stakeholders together and craft legislative proposals that would help revitalize the sport's future in the state. Franzone, who proposed his plan at a Maryland Racing Commission meeting Tuesday, said it would involve representatives from thoroughbred and harness racing — two groups that have not always gotten along — as well as track management.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | February 14, 2005
Rainbow Blue, the Maryland-born pacing filly, was named standardbred Horse of the Year last night at harness racing's annual awards ceremony at Caesars Atlantic City, N.J. Stabled at Harrington Raceway in Delaware, Rainbow Blue, who was 3 last year, won 20 of 21 races and edged Windsong's Legacy, who won trotting's Triple Crown, in voting for harness racing's highest honor. Rainbow Blue is the second straight standardbred Horse of the Year bred by Winbak Farm in Cecil County. The Winbak-bred No Pan Intended won Horse of the Year last year.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2004
When the Maryland Racing Commission convenes today to consider the most recent delay in the reopening of Laurel Park, two new commissioners will offer perspective from widely varying viewpoints. David Clogg, 57, a financial adviser, brings to the nine-member commission a background in harness racing. He has owned standardbreds and competed as an amateur driver. David Bramble, 28, a lawyer, brings to the board a background unlike any of his new colleagues, who own horses or have some other close connection to the sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2004
DOVER, Del. -- At first glance, the exterior of Dover Downs doesn't exactly conjure more famous gambling venues such as Las Vegas or Atlantic City. You won't find long stretches of glittering casinos, hotels and nightclubs. No excessive bright neon lights and blaring signage. The resort is off a busy highway and commercial corridor, with no boardwalk, beach or desert in sight. Yet Dover Downs has its own brand of low-key appeal, one that draws thousands of visitors annually. "Our amenities stack up extremely well with Vegas and Atlantic City, but the attitude is 100 miles south," says Edward J. Sutor, executive vice president/chief operating officer of Dover Downs Gaming & Entertainment Inc. "It's easygoing, and our employees have Southern hospitality.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | April 18, 2004
You could laugh, or you could cry. On Wednesday, Dale Capuano stepped on a grate outside the paddock at Pimlico Race Course, and the grate collapsed. The veteran trainer fell into water above his knees. Fortunately, he wasn't hurt, and once he realized that, he started laughing. He agreed later that he just as easily could have cried, as the collapsing grate symbolized Maryland racing. "People are really down," Capuano said. "We thought we had a pretty good chance to get something done in Annapolis this year."
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Ross Peddicord 5/8 B | November 24, 1991
Four Prince George's County firefighters were injured last night in a three-alarm fire that heavily damaged the grandstand of the Rosecroft Raceway in Oxon Hill.A parking lot attendant saw the fire and reported it at 6:02 p.m. -- just an hour before harness racing fans were scheduled to file into the grandstand for the night's races, said Peter Piringer, a fire department spokesman.Post time was 7:30 p.m. Horses were starting to make their way from the paddock to the track when the fire broke out, Mr. Piringer said.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 1, 1990
Everyone wants a piece of Mark Vogel now -- the federal authorities, the state authorities, the newspapers, his creditors, the Maryland Racing Commission. Legislators are said to find Vogel's legal and financial problems "worrisome." Should Vogel's financial network start to unravel, worried legislators say, the Maryland harness racing industry could crumble.But for all the people vying for a piece of the embattled Vogel, not one even bothered to sniff in his general direction when it counted -- by my figuring, about two years ago, when Vogel became the state's King Trot.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
CORDOVA - When racing officials created the Old Saint Nick Pace just before Christmas at Rosecroft Raceway, they limited the race to horses at least 10 years old. The intention was to showcase a local celebrity named Romanoble, a 14-year-old warhorse making his 353rd - and final - start. The old boy was being forced out to pasture. Harness racing requires mandatory retirement for horses at the end of their 14th year. Romanoble would turn 15 on Jan. 1, the official birthday of all racehorses.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
Indiana-based Centaur Inc. has created a separate management company that would reap handsome profits if a slots emporium or a full-scale casino is built at Rosecroft Raceway in Prince George's County, according to records released late yesterday. The company - Centaur Maryland LLC - would collect a management fee of $1.5 million annually, plus 5 percent of the net cash flow each year and performance bonuses, from "gaming related activities" at Rosecroft other than horse racing, the documents show.
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