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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
A Pasadena man, 44, is in critical condition after the motorcycle he was riding hit a curb, police said Wednesday morning. Richard Phillip Pedra of the 1800 block of Chesapeake Road was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore with what appeared to be life-threatening injuries, according to a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Police Department. The accident occurred at about 11 p.m. on Tuesday, Justin Mulcahy, the spokesman, said in a news release. Pedra, who was not wearing a helmet, was alone on a 2001 Harley-Davidson.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella | July 12, 2013
Harley-Davidson of Baltimore has come to the Inner Harbor. But the Baltimore County dealership is selling t-shirts at Harborplace, not Harleys. The new store in the Pratt Street Pavilion carries Harley-Davidson branded t-shirts, apparel and souvenirs. It's  seen as a way for the Pulaski Highway dealer to grow its business. "The Inner Harbor reaches many visitors to Baltimore," said Donald Meyers Jr., president of Harley-Davidson of Baltimore, in an announcement. "Now they can take home a piece of the Harley-Davidson iconic brand with a Baltimore theme.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | April 6, 2013
A La Plata man was killed early Saturday when the motorcycle he was riding collided with a truck on Route 100 near the Baltimore Washington Parkway. Anne Arundel County police said that James Garrett Henderson, 27, was traveling at a high speed when his 2005 Harley Davidson motorcycle abruptly switched lanes on westbound Route 100 and stuck the back of an Isuzu box truck. Henderson was taken to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, but he later died of his injuries.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | April 6, 2013
A La Plata man was killed early Saturday when the motorcycle he was riding collided with a truck on Route 100 near the Baltimore Washington Parkway. Anne Arundel County police said that James Garrett Henderson, 27, was traveling at a high speed when his 2005 Harley Davidson motorcycle abruptly switched lanes on westbound Route 100 and stuck the back of an Isuzu box truck. Henderson was taken to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, but he later died of his injuries.
FEATURES
By Leslie Berkman and Leslie Berkman,Los Angeles Times | October 13, 1991
The veteran bikers, wearing their trademark black leather and sporting full beards, sipped beer while their brightly chromed Harley-Davidsons, the heavyweight champs of motorcycles, sat nearby.Suddenly a new group of bikers roared onto the scene, but this crew was different.These were the Rich Urban Bikers -- Rubs or Rubbys as they are derisively known by the more rough-hewn Harley devotees -- a group that is likely to know more about stocks and financial planning than V-twin engines.They are people such as Frank Chirico, co-owner of a chain of California beauty salons who rode atop a $13,000 Harley that he spent another $8,000 customizing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Lefty Driesell had already promised that Maryland would become the "UCLA of the East" when he was hired away from Davidson two years before. Now, with a talented team led by Tom McMillen and Len Elmore about to become eligible for varsity as sophomores, Driesell was looking for a way to pump up his players going into the 1971-72 college basketball season. "I said, 'Let's start practice before everyone else and we're going to be the last team to practice. We're going to play for the national championship," Driesell recalled in a telephone interview this week.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella | July 12, 2013
Harley-Davidson of Baltimore has come to the Inner Harbor. But the Baltimore County dealership is selling t-shirts at Harborplace, not Harleys. The new store in the Pratt Street Pavilion carries Harley-Davidson branded t-shirts, apparel and souvenirs. It's  seen as a way for the Pulaski Highway dealer to grow its business. "The Inner Harbor reaches many visitors to Baltimore," said Donald Meyers Jr., president of Harley-Davidson of Baltimore, in an announcement. "Now they can take home a piece of the Harley-Davidson iconic brand with a Baltimore theme.
EXPLORE
November 26, 2012
On a recent red-white-and-blue autumn day, Chesapeake Harley-Davidson of Darlington received a certificate of award from DAR's Flag of the United States of America Committee for proper use, correct display and patriotic presentation of the flag of the United States. The award was presented by Joy Hare, regent of the Carter Braxton Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution, to Mike Nobile, general manager of Chesapeake Harley-Davidson. Regent Hare congratulated Chesapeake Harley-Davidson for flying the 20-by-40-foot United States flag above its Thunder Court entrance, illuminated 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | August 23, 1991
"Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" attempts to raise junk to the level of American pop myth. But this particular piece of garbage is not redeemable -- sewers stink and so does "Harley Davidson."Simon Wincer's new film tries to redo "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" in a slightly futuristic context -- the year is 1996 and the ozone layer is gone -- with motorcycles instead of horses. Wincer's good with horses in historical contexts -- he did "Phar Lap" and TV's "Lonesome Dove" -- but he takes a terrible spill here.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | June 30, 1993
NEW YORK -- Coming this fall, the memorabilia-filled tourist bastions in midtown Manhattan will have a new competitor: the Hog.Harley-Davidson, the easy-riding motorcycle company whose rumbling "hog" motorcycles were once synonymous with tire-squealing rebellion, is planning its latest foray into Mainstream America by licensing a cafe.A cafe?"We felt it was a non-threatening way to introduce our name to customers. Many were familiar with our name but maybe wouldn't have wanted to try us," said Art Gompers, who heads marketing and licensing at Milwaukee-based Harley-Davidson Inc.Harley already licenses items like clothes, coffee and pins, but this is its first foray into restaurants.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
A 45-year-old man has been charged with stabbing another man who he believed had damaged his motorcycle outside a Glen Burnie tavern late Sunday, Anne Arundel County Police said. The man, who police said was drunk, allegedly drove off and crashed his Harley Davidson at a nearby intersection after the altercation. Brian Scott Smith, of the unit block of Magnolia Avenue, has since been arrested and charged with multiple crimes in the incident, including attempted second-degree murder, police said.
EXPLORE
November 26, 2012
On a recent red-white-and-blue autumn day, Chesapeake Harley-Davidson of Darlington received a certificate of award from DAR's Flag of the United States of America Committee for proper use, correct display and patriotic presentation of the flag of the United States. The award was presented by Joy Hare, regent of the Carter Braxton Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution, to Mike Nobile, general manager of Chesapeake Harley-Davidson. Regent Hare congratulated Chesapeake Harley-Davidson for flying the 20-by-40-foot United States flag above its Thunder Court entrance, illuminated 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
A 47-year-old Joppa resident died Wednesday night in a motorcycle accident on Old York Road, according to the Baltimore County police department. Larry Stephen Hicks Jr., of the 1900 block of Mountain Road in Joppa, was pronounced dead at the scene. According to the police department, officers responded around 11:30 p.m. Wednesday to a report of a motorcycle accident at Old York Road and Openshaw Road. Investigators determined that the 2008 Harley Davidson motorcycle operated by Hicks was traveling eastbound on Old York Road when it left the roadway and struck a utility pole.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Lefty Driesell had already promised that Maryland would become the "UCLA of the East" when he was hired away from Davidson two years before. Now, with a talented team led by Tom McMillen and Len Elmore about to become eligible for varsity as sophomores, Driesell was looking for a way to pump up his players going into the 1971-72 college basketball season. "I said, 'Let's start practice before everyone else and we're going to be the last team to practice. We're going to play for the national championship," Driesell recalled in a telephone interview this week.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
A Pasadena man, 44, is in critical condition after the motorcycle he was riding hit a curb, police said Wednesday morning. Richard Phillip Pedra of the 1800 block of Chesapeake Road was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore with what appeared to be life-threatening injuries, according to a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Police Department. The accident occurred at about 11 p.m. on Tuesday, Justin Mulcahy, the spokesman, said in a news release. Pedra, who was not wearing a helmet, was alone on a 2001 Harley-Davidson.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
A huge new Harley-Davidson motorcycle dealership atop a hill overlooking U.S. 1 in Elkridge is open for business, its bright orange roof a symbol of the rejuvenation of the old commercial corridor. The Harley-Davidson of Maryland dealership, which sold more than 500 bikes last year, moved from cramped quarters in the nearby Elkridge Industrial Park on the east side of U.S. 1 to a facility nearly three times as large. "It's the best-kept secret, and now it's going to be out," said owner Tina Wehner.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 18, 2001
YORK, Pa. - I was tired of hearing all this gloom and doom about the economy, about layoffs and production cuts and Chapter 11 proceedings, and so I did what has always proved helpful when faced with an onslaught of depressing news: I hit the road. On a gorgeous fall morning, I drove up I-83 North to this gritty southern Pennsylvania city where the sprawling Harley-Davidson assembly plant is located. Even though the economy is officially in the toilet, Harley, the legendary American motorcycle manufacturer, had just announced record sales and earnings for its third quarter: a 19.1 percent jump in sales and a 34 percent increase in profit.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
A huge new Harley-Davidson motorcycle dealership atop a hill overlooking U.S. 1 in Elkridge is open for business, its bright orange roof a symbol of the rejuvenation of the old commercial corridor. The Harley-Davidson of Maryland dealership, which sold more than 500 bikes last year, moved from cramped quarters in the nearby Elkridge Industrial Park on the east side of U.S. 1 to a facility nearly three times as large. "It's the best-kept secret, and now it's going to be out," said owner Tina Wehner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Sulon and Bill Sulon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 2004
In 1903, the year the Wright brothers made aviation history with their first flight, a couple of Milwaukee friends got their own little invention rolling. William S. Harley and Arthur Davidson, two young men looking for an easier way to get around town, attached a single-cylinder engine to a modified bicycle frame. In the century since that first minimalist Harley-Davidson motorcycle was built in Davidson's shed, the manufacturing process has become somewhat more sophisticated. That process -- a noisy mix of manual labor, steel presses, robotic wizardry and snakelike assembly lines -- is open to visitors at Harley-Davidson's main manufacturing plant in York, Pa. The free tour, which lasts about an hour, is designed to appeal to anyone interested in modern manufacturing, although motorcycle enthusiasts, particularly Harley fans, probably will find more meaning in the session.
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