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NEWS
May 29, 2003
On May 26, 2003, HARLEM R. SCHLOSS, beloved husband of Ruth Schloss (nee Rosen) and the late Janet Schloss (nee Cooper); loving father of Louis M. Schloss of Jersey City, NJ and the late Merle Linda Hamberger; beloved step-father of Ann Zeren and Pacy Oletsky; devoted father-in-law of Nina Schloss and Bonnie Oletsky; dear brother of the late Charles, Samuel and Bernard Schloss, and Flo Goldstein. Loving grandfather of Leonard Schloss, Jill D'earmon, Karen Schloss, Lori Brickell, Marci Simmons, Jon Oletsky, Julie Katz, Jason Oletsky, Jamie Honick and Cortney Freiman; loving great-grandfather of twelve.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A 36-year-old man has been charged in a nonfatal shooting in Baltimore last month, police said. Derrick Stockeling, of the 3100 block of Belmont Ave., shot a 40-year-old man in the thigh on Aug. 1 in the 1800 block of Edmondson Ave. in Harlem Park, police said. The victim was treated at a hospital for his injury and released. Police arrested Stockeling on Saturday, after a witness identified him as the suspect who got out of a parked car and shot the victim, the department said.
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NEWS
By Newsday | December 24, 1992
NEW YORK -- Harlem's towering Riverside Church wa packed by hundreds of residents, politicians and others who mourned Clara McBride Hale with eulogies that likened her to St. Peter and called her "our black Madonna."In the front rows sat children and adults whose precarious lives had depended on Hale House, the Harlem brownstone set up by Mrs. Hale to house drug-addicted or HIV-infected mothers. In the course of caring for nearly 1,000 children, the former domestic worker earned herself the moniker "Mother Hale."
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Two men were injured by a BB gun in an aggravated assault in a West Baltimore alley Monday, police said. Officers, called shortly after 4 p.m., found a 48-year-old man with wounds to his leg and back at the intersection of W. Lanvale Street and Kirby Lane. The second victim, a 29-year-old, walked into an area hospital with an injury to his chest about 10 minutes later. The 48-year-old was in good condition and the 29-year-old was in fair condition, police said, and both were stable.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1996
HARLEM, N.Y. -- After decades of watching their audiences dwindle, the preachers of Harlem are celebrating a boom. Their pews are packed again.But the audiences look a lot different from the way they did in the neighborhood's heyday. During the 1920s and '30s, the people crowding Memorial Baptist Church and the Kelly Temple Church of God in Christ were African-American men and women in suits and silk hats. Today, most of the people filling the sanctuaries are white tourists in jeans, sweat shirts and sneakers.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 1997
NEW YORK -- The phone in Van Woods' office on Lenox Avenue is scratched from overuse, rung out by the new Harlem renaissance.Line one is Woods' mother calling from downstairs, where she runs Sylvia's, the legendary soul food restaurant. Line two is Woods' banker at J. P. Morgan, who is bankrolling his effort to turn Sylvia's into a national chain. Line three is a local entrepreneur who needs start-up capital and knows that Van Woods is the prototypical man to see in 1990s Harlem: a businessman with close Republican ties.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 5, 2004
Keyed to Black History Month - and just in time for Valentine's Day - is Hirschfeld's Harlem (Glenn Young Books, 128 pages, $75), a beautiful valentine to African-American artists of Harlem and beyond. The large, lush volume - with 30 color plates and 90 black and whites - is a greatly expanded reissue of a 1941 collection of illustrations by the great show-business artist Al Hirschfeld, who died in January 2003 at age 99. Curated by the artist's widow, Louise Kerz Hirschfeld, the book includes an introduction written by the artist shortly before his death.
NEWS
By E. R. Shipp and E. R. Shipp,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1991
NEW YORK -- One day next spring, groundbreaking should begin on an effort to restore boarded-up buildings and bottomed-out lives in one of the most devastated areas of New York City: an urban wasteland that spans nearly 40 blocks in Harlem.But as that day approaches -- a day that many have worked toward since the mid-1970s -- a consortium of Harlem's religious, civic and business leaders is locked in a fierce battle over who will control the project, known as Bradhurst.Already, the administration of Mayor David N. Dinkins has set aside $18.4 million in its capital budget to start the first phase of the program, renovating 18 buildings to provide 320 apartments for homeless low- and moderate-income families.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 2, 2007
American Gangster, the story of real-life 1960s Harlem super-criminal Frank Lucas (Denzel Washington), wants to be The Godfather, Serpico and that blaxploitation cult classic, Across 110th Street, wrapped into one Superfly chinchilla coat. It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries edited to be seen in a single sitting, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. The human drama takes a back seat to rise-and-fall criminal milestones that occur every 15 minutes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1995
NEW YORK -- Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Police Commissioner William Bratton said yesterday that the black gunman-arsonist who killed seven people and himself in a fiery attack on a Jewish-owned clothing store in Harlem on Friday had apparently been racially motivated.At a news conference a day after Freddy's clothing store on 125th Street was turned into a blazing death trap by a man with a revolver and a container of flammable liquid, the mayor urged caution about the interpretation of an incident with potentially explosive racial overtones.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Dr. Garfield D. Kington, a physician who was a familiar and comforting presence to his West Baltimore patients for decades, died Aug. 3 of multiple myeloma at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 91. "We were colleagues on the medical staff at Provident Hospital and became friends. I met Dr. Kington and observed him in his office, where he worked late through the day seeing patients in a tough neighborhood and provided an excellent standard of care," said Dr. Keiffer Mitchell, an internist who has practiced in Baltimore for 43 years.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
As Baltimore Board of School Commissioners conducts a national search for a new leader to replace outgoing schools CEO Andrés Alonso, it must consider is what further changes are needed to build on the reforms he initiated. Specifically, it needs to ask whether the improvements in school governance, attendance and teacher evaluation that were hallmarks of Mr. Alonso's tenure are by themselves sufficient to move the system to the next level, or whether a broader strategy is needed that takes into account not just what goes on inside the school building but also addresses the larger issues of poverty, violence and family instability in the communities students come from.
TRAVEL
The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Passengers aboard a recent flight from Denver to San Diego might have noticed a whole lot of shakin' going on. The Harlem Shake, that is - a viral dance craze sweeping across the nation from sea to sky? The video shows passengers dancing in the aisles of a Frontier Airlines flight cruising along at more than 30,000 feet. According to The Catalyst , a Colorado College student newspaper, the students were traveling from Colorado Springs for an ultimate frisbee contest. While a spokeswoman for Frontier Airlines has said the seat belt sign was off and no passengers were in danger, the FAA is reportedly looking into the incident.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Some guys gave flowers. Others candy. But smooth Rod Lopez, a man in touch with the cultural cutting edge, feted his lady love with a "Harlem Shake" video for Valentine's Day. In it, the 34-year-old owner of a Parkville production company, wearing jockey shorts, shimmies atop a desk while holding a heart-shaped balloon. And no, he says, divorce papers are not imminent. "She thought it was romantic," Lopez says. "We're making another one tonight with the whole family. " With "Call Me Maybe" history and "Gangnam Style" only a faint viral echo, conditions seemed ripe for another catchy ear worm with even more contagious video possibilities.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 31, 2013
Musical and cultural diversity are at the heart of what the Harlem Quartet is all about. The string ensemble brings an eclectic program to Columbia when it performs for the Candlelight Concert Society series on Saturday, Feb. 2, at 8 p.m., at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. This program's mix of venerable classical selections and contemporary compositions features Turina's "La Oracion del Torero," Op. 34; Haydn's Quartet in D minor, Op. 76, No. 2, "Fifths"; Chick Corea's "Adventures of Hippocrates"; Mozart's Quartet No. 15 in D minor, K. 421; and Walter Piston's Quartet No. 1. The Harlem Quartet, which previously appeared for the Candlelight series in 2010, has been doing varied programs since it made its debut at New York's Carnegie Hall in 2006.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 23, 2012
The Harlem Globetrotters are bringing their world famous tradition of ball handling wizardry, basketball artistry, and one-of-a-kind, high-flying family entertainment to Harford County in late December. The hard court phenoms will be on display at Harford Community College's new APG Federal Credit Union Arena, Dec. 30 at 2 p.m., according to the college's website. Reserved seating is available from as low as $25 to $65. Upper baseline seats are $25 with upper courtside seats at $30. Lower baseline seats are $35 and lower courtside seats are $40. Magic Circle seating is $65. Tickets can be purchased through phone at 443-412-2211 or by visitng the HCC website at http://www.harford.edu .
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 1998
NEW YORK -- Intent on preventing any outbreaks of violence, the New York City Police Department intends to saturate the site of today's planned rally in Harlem with as many as 250 officers along each of the six blocks set aside for the event.And, officials said, they will clear the streets promptly at the demonstration's court-ordered finish at 4 p.m., whether the event -- being billed as the Million Youth March -- has ended or not."I'm in charge," Police Commissioner Howard Safir declared on the eve of the rally being led by Khallid Abdul Muhammad, who has warned that he will bring gangs to the event.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2003
When it comes to famous food pairings, chicken and waffles may raise a few eyebrows, their savory and sweet merger a culinary mystery to the uninitiated. Yet this quirky taste combination, popular for decades in some African-American and other ethnic communities, has gone mainstream. Crispy fried chicken and light, golden waffles are turning up together on restaurant menus and specialty eateries nationwide, including in Baltimore. "When we moved here from New York three years ago, we noticed there wasn't a chicken-and-waffle place," says Sham Hodges who, with wife Danielle, owns ShamDanai's on Eastern Avenue, billed as the city's first chicken-and-waffle house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
For more that two decades, author Emily Bernard has been fascinated by Carl Van Vechten, a white man who played a seminal - and controversial - role in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s. She was in turns appalled by Vechten's air of entitlement, amused by some of his provocations and moved by his devotion to individual artists. (For instance, Van Vechten lobbied authorities to erect a nude, anatomically correct statue in New York's Central Park of the African-American activist James Weldon Johnson.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Baltimore police are investigating two separate overnight shootings in two city neighborhoods that have struggled with violence. A man was shot around 4 a.m. Saturday in Northwest Baltimore near Chalgrove and W. Garrison avenues in the Central Park Heights neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore. Shortly after 10 p.m. Friday, a man was shot in the 600 block of N. Fulton Avenue in the Harlem Park neighborhood of West Baltimore. At least three people have been killed in Central Park Heights since last year, according to police, including a 43-year-old man who was shot and stabbed in June in the 3200 block of Spaulding Avenue.
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