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Harford Road

NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | November 9, 2005
Just feet from the porch of Sue Holmes' two-story craftsman-style house sits the future of one of Baltimore's solidly middle-class neighborhoods: A small tract of land at Harford Road and Montebello Terrace, home to a now-shuttered gas station and convenience store. Long an eyesore to many Lauraville residents - overrun with a dilapidated forklift, abandoned boat and piles of carpet - the site is now on the brink of transformation. "If the city didn't come, it would still be a junkyard," Holmes said.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2001
As Tiffany Thomas slept in her rowhouse in the 3000 block of Harford Road yesterday, a city tow truck driver swept by and loaded up her sleek green 2000 Mitsubishi Montero, the first haul of the city's widening net of parking enforcement. By 8 a.m., 20 minutes after the tow truck left, Thomas was standing on her porch, wondering where her sport utility vehicle had gone. She had started to report to police that it had been stolen when her grandmother told her that the city had towed it. "I almost had a heart attack," she said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1997
Architects hired by the Harford Road community group have sketched a colorful new vision of the gray urban corridor that would make the most of a planned new Safeway and save the old Bond Lumber Co. building slated for demolition.The aim of the design, said Mike Watkins of Duany Plater-Zyberk, was to give a "sense of identity" to the milelong stretch of Harford Road centered on the Cold Spring Lane intersection, stretching from Parkside Drive to Echodale Avenue.In a meeting Tuesday night on the Morgan State University campus that concluded a weeklong dialogue, Watkins showed residents drawings of an elaborate watchtower entrance announcing the neighborhood of Lauraville.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
Someone's been making off with the big industrial batteries that provide backup power at traffic signals in Baltimore, and now the thefts are being investigated by the city inspector general's office, which looks into allegations of waste, fraud and abuse in municipal government. A representative of the battery's manufacturer said the thieves most likely would have tried to sell the 54-pound batteries as scrap for their lead content. Russell Conelley, an agent in the IG's office, confirmed in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that it is investigating battery thefts reported to have occurred along Harford Road in Northeast Baltimore and Wilkens Avenue in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By David Anderson and David Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
The State Highway Administration has begun work on projects designed to improve pedestrian safety along Harford Road in the Parkville-Carney area. The improvements, which crews started last week, are between the Baltimore City line and Joppa Road. They include new crosswalks and other traffic-calming measures, stop lines to show motorists approaching Harford Road on side streets where to stop, 4-foot-wide bicycle lanes and a new traffic light. Installation of the traffic light, at Harford and Emerald roads, will begin Dec. 1 and should be completed by early next year, said Lora Rakowski, a State Highway Administration spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
City police today continued their search for Kenneth Lambert, 25, of the 2000 block of Kennedy Ave., in the fatal shooting and attempted robbery Tuesday of a 23-year-old barber outside a carryout in the 2600 block of Harford Road.Police said a warrant charging Lambert with first-degree murder and attempted armed robbery was issued yesterday after witnesses gave police information.The victim, Derek Session, who worked in his father's barber shop on Kirk Avenue and lived in the 1500 block of Gorsuch Ave., was standing outside the Star Carryout in the 2600 block of Harford Road shortly before 11 p.m. when he was accosted by a man armed with a handgun who demanded Session's jewelry.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | September 3, 1993
A 1,000-pound bull escaped from a Northeast Baltimore slaughterhouse yesterday and ran wild for seven blocks before two police officers fired 10 gunshots and killed it, police said.The bull broke free about 11:50 a.m. from a pen at the Charles J. Schmidt & Co. Inc. meatpacking plant in the 2100 block of Harford Road and ran north, police said.Along the way, the animal frightened numerous motorists who were shocked to see a bull running in traffic, but no accidents were reported, police said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1999
The Harford Road Partnership, known as HARP, has appointed a new executive director, Brent Flickinger, who started the full-time post last week.Flickinger, 47, previously worked as a Baltimore County community planner, concentrating on the Northeast section. He also has worked as director of research and planning for the Archdiocese of Baltimore and as a community organizer in the Park Heights section of Northwest Baltimore.He succeeds Marian Gillis as HARP's executive director, responsible for overseeing community and economic development in the stretch of Harford Road that begins at Argonne Drive and continues north for a mile and a half through Lauraville and Beverly Hills in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. promoted yesterday his successful effort to increase car registration fees in announcing a $9.6 million project to make Harford Road in Parkville safer for pedestrians and friendlier for businesses. Saying the project is the first of many around the state that will be paid for with the new revenues, Ehrlich couched the contentious vote on the fee increase in stark terms: He surrounded himself with dozens of children who attend St. Ursula's, a Catholic school 20 yards from a stretch of Harford Road where officials say speeding is a significant problem.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
The execution-style slaying of a Baltimore police officer happened close enough to the storefront windowfor a stray bullet to shatter it. For a month, Craig Van Cutsem has kept the shell casing below the cracked glass, awaiting an insurance agent's appraisal. To Van Cutsem, owner of Weaco Inc., an ornamental ironwork factory that has been in business at Harford Road and Darley Avenue in Northeast Baltimore since 1952, the shooting was a too-familiar reminder that the neighborhood is half a century and a world apart from the one where it began.
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