Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHarford Community College
IN THE NEWS

Harford Community College

EXPLORE
By Aegis staff report | May 27, 2011
April 30 turned out to be a perfect springtime day for the first Clear Your Clutter Day coordinated by Harford County organizing company Sappari Solutions and Harford Community College. According to the organizers, the event drew 187 cars to the Fallston Hall parking lot at Harford Community College, where they dropped off a winter's worth of clutter in the form of recyclable and reusable items. Event partners Always Recycling, Friends of the Harford County Public Library, Bel Air Lions Club, Klein's ShopRite, Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake and ShredInstead collected books, eyeglasses, scrap metal, household goods, documents to be shredded, plastic bags and more unwanted stuff.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
Sitting in an office just a short pass from the school's gymnasium, former football coach Dick Fordyce reflected on his nearly 40 years of service at Harford Community College and how he got to this point. "It all began with a leg injury after three games in my senior year in high school," said the Pittsburgh native. "Like most football players in my area, I expected to play college football in western Pennsylvania. But most area schools lost interest." He explained that a friend of his high school coach happened to be in Pittsburgh attending a coaches convention.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 1, 2012
More than 600 cars brought unwanted household items and other recyclables to the second Clear Your Clutter Day held Saturday at Harford Community College. "We had an overwhelming response with 623 cars coming through," Nettie Owens, the owner of Sappari Solutions and the event's organizer, wrote in an e-mail thanking those who participated. The four-hour event was held in one of the HCC parking lots. "That does not include the many cars who got in line, waited an hour and decided to move on before actually coming through," Owens continued.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | January 28, 2007
HCC savors growing gains Launched in 1957 with a $10,000 grant from the county government, Harford Junior College - as it was known back then - opened its doors with 119 students and 16 staff members. The college offered night courses at $7 per credit hour in classrooms at Bel Air High School. "When I first started teaching, I had a classroom that I shared with the other part-time instructors," said Dorothy Dare, 84, an Aberdeen resident who taught math in the school's inaugural year. "The rooms were sparsely furnished with a teacher's desk, a chalkboard and desks for the students.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
With its expanding population, rich base of military jobs and lack of a four-year university, Harford County is widely viewed as the next key frontier in Maryland higher education. Morgan State and Towson University want to establish satellite operations in the county. Both say they can offer unique programs that perfectly suit Harford's need for technology-savvy, business-adept graduates. Both are coveted by county leaders. Yet the two institutions, which have clashed over programs before, disagree over how the expansion should occur.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
In an effort to avoid costly employee turnover, Rite Aid Corp. is spending more money on worker retention in the hopes that it will save much more down the road.The Camp Hill, Pa.-based drugstore chain is using the construction of its $90 million, million-square-foot Mid-Atlantic Customer Support Center in Perryman, Harford County -- which opened in September -- to try a new approach, said Jim Orahood, the facility's general manager.Orahood, other company officials and Harford Community College have designed a six-week, paid training program for workers to tackle the reasons behind turnover, such as lack of worker cohesiveness, teamwork and a corporate culture.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
Irna Jay was explaining the photographs in her new exhibit when she stopped cold. "This one is crooked," she said, darting back to get a small red level to place over the scene of men playing pool on St. John Street. The slight list was barely noticeable, but small details mean a lot to Jay. A documentary photographer, Jay uses those details to craft images that illuminate the world beyond her lens. Now 54 of her photos, focusing on Havre de Grace, are on display at the Chesapeake Gallery at Harford Community College, in a show called Havre de Grace: A Living Portrait.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2003
Usually a library is the place to go to research a project, but for the Harford Community College Future Interior Designers Organization, the library itself was the project. The student club transformed a former administrative office in the historic Hays-Heighe House in Churchville into a formal "gentleman's library" during last year's AMC Cancer Research Center Decorator Show House. The students were rewarded for their efforts on the Hays-Heighe House project when they were chosen in September for first place in the student division of the Interior Design Competition sponsored by the Maryland Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers and Chesapeake Home Magazine.
NEWS
August 15, 1991
Leland C. Sanborn has been reappointed to the Harford Community College's Board of Trustees by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, the college announced
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.