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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1998
When Cheryl Nokes worried about whether she would make it through nursing school, she went to Union Bridge Hardware Co. next door to her home to recharge her confidence.When Town Councilwoman Karen L. Kotarski returned from a trip to Iceland, she went to the hardware store to share vacation stories.When Margaret "Rosie" Rinehart picks flowers from her garden on Farquhar Street, she always takes a bouquet to Thomas R. and Irene Winebrener at their store.For nearly half a century, the store in this town of 1,000 has been a symbol of Carroll County's rural lifestyle -- a place where folks drop in as much for conversation as for cans of paint, lag bolts or lengths of pipe.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Jeffrey L. Clement, a retired co-owner of an Anne Arundel County hardware store, died Saturday of Alzheimer's disease at Sunrise Assisted Living in Severna Park. He was 66. The son of hardware store owners, Jeffrey Lawrence Clement was born in Sunbury, Pa., and was raised in Seneca Falls, N.Y., and St. Davids, Pa. He also had lived in Seattle and Baltimore. He was a 1965 graduate of Radnor High School in Radnor, Pa., and earned a bachelor's degree in 1969 in medieval history and economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.
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BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | December 21, 1990
Home Depot Inc., one of the largest hardware stores in the nation, has announced it will open its first store in the Baltimore area, which analysts said yesterday will present formidable competition to Landover-based Hechinger Co.Atlanta-based Home Depot, a 137-store warehouse building-products retailer, said it will open a 130,000-square-foot store in Glen Burnie near a Hechinger store. Another Home Depot will open in White Marsh, but no opening date has been scheduled, the company said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
During a quiet morning at his hardware store, owner Jared Littmann strolled down an aisle to chat up a regular customer who was looking at smoke alarms. "Good to see you. Let me know what you need," Littmann told Ben Derrick, a handyman for Annapolis Property Services, who was shopping at Littmann's K&B True Value hardware store in Annapolis. Though he's in the store almost daily, Derrick said he didn't know Littmann will soon be sworn in as the Ward 5 alderman on the Annapolis city council.
BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Hechinger Co. reported sharply higher first-quarter earnings yesterday, offering evidence that cost-cutting and revamping in its chain of hardware stores is beginning to pay off.For the three months ended April 30, Hechinger Co.'s profits were $4.6 million, or 11 cents a share, a 44 percent jump from a year earlier, when profits were $3.2 million, or 8 cents a share. Sales increased 20 percent, to $574 million, and comparable-store sales were up 6 percent.Analysts said the latest results show the company successfully has cut costs at its 72 Hechinger hardware stores in the Mid-Atlantic region and has converted many to a new larger "home project" format.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | February 25, 1991
Black & Decker Corp., long a big name in hardware stores and construction tools, wants to get into the decorating business.And 36-year-old Bruce Cazenave is leading Black & Decker's charge into the 20,000 paint and decorating stores across the nation -- stores that have long ignored most of the tools and appliances the company offers.Though construction activity -- and demand for some tools -- has fallen off during the recession, Black & Decker believes the new decorating division will be a winner.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 29, 1992
Washington -- As Chuck Williams sees it, there are similarities between selling hardware and selling cookware.Williams knows both fields. Back in the '50s he transformed his hardware store in Sonoma, Calif., into a kitchen supply store, soon moving it to San Francisco. That was the beginning of what is now a national Williams-Sonoma empire with over 100 stores, including three in the Baltimore area.The secret to success in hardware as well as housewares, Williams said, is hiring folks who are familiar with the devices they are selling.
NEWS
By GEORGE W. BENSON III | June 8, 1994
As far back as I can remember, my family has owned a hardware store. My grandfather, father and I once had a chance to have our group picture taken in front of it, but we blew it.Benson's Hardware is not a Hardware Fair. It has never tried to be one. Originally a general store, the hardware section is all that remains of what was once a prosperous meat and poultry shop, coal yard and feed lot.The store itself is hard to find unless you've been there before. A jewelry store on one side, a jewelry display window on the other, the hardware store has no sign.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Michael Burns Rafferty, who owned hardware businesses in Baltimore, died Sept. 28 of complications of Alzheimer's disease at Heatherwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Newport, R.I. The former Guilford resident was 76. Born in Providence, R.I., he attended Phillips Exeter Academy and earned a bachelor's degree in business from Yale University. Mr. Rafferty moved to Baltimore in the late 1960s and initially lived on Tyson Street after his marriage to the former Suzanne Lear, an artist and designer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Jeanette F. Bevard, a former Baltimore hardware store owner and active churchwoman, died Feb. 5 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident, who moved to Towson a decade ago, was 96. The daughter of a factory foreman and a homemaker, Jeanette F. Goodman was born in Baltimore and raised on West Lanvale Street and Franklintown Road. She was a 1932 graduate of Western High School and went to work at the Hochschild Kohn department store at Howard and Lexington streets.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Michael Burns Rafferty, who owned hardware businesses in Baltimore, died Sept. 28 of complications of Alzheimer's disease at Heatherwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Newport, R.I. The former Guilford resident was 76. Born in Providence, R.I., he attended Phillips Exeter Academy and earned a bachelor's degree in business from Yale University. Mr. Rafferty moved to Baltimore in the late 1960s and initially lived on Tyson Street after his marriage to the former Suzanne Lear, an artist and designer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
John Vander Horst Jr., a former hardware store executive, died Sept. 8 in Charleston, S.C., where he was recuperating from triple bypass surgery. The former Owings Mills and Roland Park resident was 69. The son of the Episcopal bishop of Tennessee and a homemaker, Mr. Vander Horst was born in Philadelphia and raised in Ellicott City, Macon, Ga., and Chattanooga, Tenn. After graduating in 1961 from what is now Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Conn., he attended Sewanee: The University of the South, in Sewanee, Tenn.
NEWS
Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
A 48-year-old man was arrested after a short pursuit in connection with the Thursday morning burglary of a Glen Burnie hardware store, according to Anne Arundel County police. Officers from the Eastern District responded to an Ace Hardware store in the 7900 block of Crain Highway at approximately 3:30 a.m. Thursday and noticed Richard Scott Rotramel of Glen Burnie leaving the store's parking lot in a Chevy Cavalier, police said. Rotramel refused to stop, so officers followed the vehicle, according to police.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
Jeanette F. Bevard, a former Baltimore hardware store owner and active churchwoman, died Feb. 5 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident, who moved to Towson a decade ago, was 96. The daughter of a factory foreman and a homemaker, Jeanette F. Goodman was born in Baltimore and raised on West Lanvale Street and Franklintown Road. She was a 1932 graduate of Western High School and went to work at the Hochschild Kohn department store at Howard and Lexington streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrea K. Walker | February 5, 2010
Jittery shoppers were crowding grocery and hardware stores early Thursday, stocking up on food and anything that would make it easier to clear their driveways and sidewalks. The area's Home Depot stores have been shipping in snow shovels, snowblowers and other items from stores in New England to keep up with the demand. Jim Emge, district manager of the Baltimore-area stores, said snowblowers are especially popular: People's backs and spirits might not able to bear yet again digging out of mounds of snow with an old-fashioned shovel.
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