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By Linda Lowe Morris | July 21, 1991
Maybe you think you're immune to the seduction of a new cookbook.Now that every bookshelf in your house is packed full. Now that you've got about four million recipes that you're never going to live long enough to try anyway. You probably think there's nothing new that anyone could possibly write or publish that could lure you into walking up to that counter and spending your precious cash.But you would be wrong.The new cookbooks -- those about to be published this fall, winter and next spring -- made their debut last month at the 91st annual convention and trade show of the American Booksellers Association.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
It's fair to say that very few novels that devote 496 pages to such weighty themes as race in America ever crack The New York Times best-seller list. But sure enough, there on the June 2 list for hardcover fiction was Columbia resident Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's "Americanah," alongside the perennially popular Dan Brown, Nora Roberts and George R.R. Martin. True, "Americanah" technically ranked in the less-prestigious "also selling" category. And true, it occupied that spot for just one week.
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FEATURES
By JOSH GETLIN and JOSH GETLIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2006
For anyone who somehow missed picking up one of the 43 million hardcover copies of The Da Vinci Code that have been sold around the world in the past three years, the publisher is finally getting around to releasing the paperback -- in a big way. On March 28, Random House will be placing 5 million softcover copies of Dan Brown's conspiracy-minded religious thriller in an array of outlets well beyond your neighborhood bookstore, including drugstores, supermarkets,...
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
Ever wanted to be a published photographer, to see those pictures that everyone tells you are so great put into a book that can then be given an honored place in your home library? Sure you have, admit it. And thanks to all those photobook Web sites that have sprouted online in recent years, you can. More than a dozen companies offer their services online, and most photo retailers (including Ritz Camera) allow you to create books online or at the store. The basics are pretty simple: Take those pictures from your digital camera or scan other photos, and using programs downloaded from the company Web sites, you can design your own book, even adding text if you want.
FEATURES
By Carol Monaghan and Carol Monaghan,Chicago Tribune | June 11, 1998
In "Rat Teeth" by Patricia Reilly Giff, Cliffe hates his life since switching schools. His teeth stick out a mile, causing Cliffe to believe he's the most laughed-at kid in America; his teacher yells at him; and he lives out of a beatup suitcase he drags between his divorced parents' houses. Cliffe decides acting tough and baseball are the only two things that will get him through fifth grade. But when he blows the big game, he vows never to set foot in school again. If you've ever felt like faking a note rather than facing up to your troubles, you'll relate to Cliffe.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1990
COOKBOOKS ARE A welcome gift at the holidays because they provide sweet tastes year round. The cookies might be long gone, but you can always reach for a book and make more. Here is a sampling of some exceptional cookbooks, Christmas-themed and otherwise, to delight a variety of cooks.?3 * "The Christmas Cookie Book" by Judy Knipe andBarbara Marks (Fawcett Columbine, 1990, $14.95 hard cover). This small, charming book has no photographs or color pictures, but the recipes sound so tantalizing it's no matter.
NEWS
September 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Deborah Wright, coordinator of the Institute for Drug and Alcohol Abuse Education at Carroll Community College, and her husband, Bob, have been notified that their forthcoming book, "Dare to Confront," has been chosen as a Literary Guild Selection.Published by Master Media Ltd. of New York, the 220-page hardcover book tells how families, friends and co-workers can convince a substance abuser to stop or get help, without the assistance of a professional interventionist.The book has received several national endorsements and carries an introduction by Dr. Darryl Inaba of the Haight Ashbury Clinics and former ambassador Dr. Ruth Farkas.
FEATURES
November 10, 1999
Young readers enjoy fantasy stories, but they are also quite eager to learn more about the world around them. A delightful source to satisfy their quest for knowledge can be found in a relatively new series titled, "The Eyewitness Readers" from DK Publishing.These are easy-to-read, nonfiction books written at four reading levels for children ages 3 to 9. Each level contains eight books covering a variety of topics that fascinate children, and each book combines photographs and illustrations with absorbing facts.
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong and Meredith James and Julia Furlong and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2003
Madonna, infamous pop chameleon, is apparently still carrying on with her "British Mummy" gig. Her first children's book, The English Roses, is released today. The one-time Material Girl, now mom to Lola and Rocco, has written a story for kids about how to deal with even the most colorful emotions. The 48-page, hardcover volume (Callaway Editions, $19.95), is the first of five such books planned and will raise money for a children's spirituality foundation. Roses, however, is not Madonna's first foray into publishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Guernsey and Lisa Guernsey,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2001
This spring, Princeton University Press unveiled an unusual electronic book program designed to free books not only from the space restrictions of print but also from time restrictions. Called Princeton Digital Books Plus, the program goes beyond producing electronic copies of static hardcover books. Instead, each book is designed to evolve after its publication date, shaped by online discussions among readers and authors. The first book to be vaulted into the public arena of feedback and revision is "Republic.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Reporter | March 25, 2007
The Secret, the latest Oprah-approved mystical self-help sensation, promises to bring you wealth, fabulous sex, health, joy, jewelry, a fancy car - whatever you most want. It works this way: When you want something strongly enough you put out a positive vibration to the universe, which then deposits whatever you desire in your lap. The opposite is also true. Think negative thoughts and bad things will happen. This so-called "law of attraction" may get you something even more desirable than health, wealth and happiness: a great parking space.
FEATURES
By JOSH GETLIN and JOSH GETLIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2006
For anyone who somehow missed picking up one of the 43 million hardcover copies of The Da Vinci Code that have been sold around the world in the past three years, the publisher is finally getting around to releasing the paperback -- in a big way. On March 28, Random House will be placing 5 million softcover copies of Dan Brown's conspiracy-minded religious thriller in an array of outlets well beyond your neighborhood bookstore, including drugstores, supermarkets,...
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 25, 2004
They came in masses: teachers, social workers, even the odd biblical scholar, filling the 420-seat auditorium at the Walters Art Museum and spilling into the hallway. Some drove for an hour or more on a work night to watch five people sit on stage and talk about a book. Such is the appeal of The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown's fictional treatise that melds together the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Catholicism, the Holy Grail, murder and secret societies. Barely 19 months after it was published, the book's publisher already is claiming that it is the most popular hardcover book yet printed.
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong and Meredith James and Julia Furlong and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2003
Madonna, infamous pop chameleon, is apparently still carrying on with her "British Mummy" gig. Her first children's book, The English Roses, is released today. The one-time Material Girl, now mom to Lola and Rocco, has written a story for kids about how to deal with even the most colorful emotions. The 48-page, hardcover volume (Callaway Editions, $19.95), is the first of five such books planned and will raise money for a children's spirituality foundation. Roses, however, is not Madonna's first foray into publishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff | June 22, 2003
Living History, by Hillary Clinton. Simon & Schuster. 576 pages. $28. Buy one, get one free, Hillary Clinton would tell voters during the '92 presidential campaign. Her new memoir is like that: several volumes in one. Its a personal story, a feminist manifesto, a first lady book and a campaign tract, and all leave something to be desired. She's the most popular, and most formidable, female politician in America. But after more than a decade of probes into her marriage, finances and opinions, we still don't really know her. Where, exactly, do her drive and torrid ambition come from?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Guernsey and Lisa Guernsey,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2001
This spring, Princeton University Press unveiled an unusual electronic book program designed to free books not only from the space restrictions of print but also from time restrictions. Called Princeton Digital Books Plus, the program goes beyond producing electronic copies of static hardcover books. Instead, each book is designed to evolve after its publication date, shaped by online discussions among readers and authors. The first book to be vaulted into the public arena of feedback and revision is "Republic.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
Ever wanted to be a published photographer, to see those pictures that everyone tells you are so great put into a book that can then be given an honored place in your home library? Sure you have, admit it. And thanks to all those photobook Web sites that have sprouted online in recent years, you can. More than a dozen companies offer their services online, and most photo retailers (including Ritz Camera) allow you to create books online or at the store. The basics are pretty simple: Take those pictures from your digital camera or scan other photos, and using programs downloaded from the company Web sites, you can design your own book, even adding text if you want.
NEWS
November 16, 1992
Jack Woodall picked up "The Dream Train" for a trip downtown Friday afternoon, but two hours later the hardcover book was back on the shelf at the Milford Mill Metro Station.What he thought would be a good read about trains turned into a fanciful romance set aboard the Orient Express."It wasn't that good ---- a woman's book," says Mr. Woodall, a retired salesman who takes the Metro two or three times a week.But while "The Dream Train" got a thumbs down, Mr. Woodall and his fellow Metro commuters gave an enthusiastic thumbs-up this week to the new book exchange at the Metro station in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
Young writers had their chance to shine Friday when the second grade at Carrolltowne Elementary held an authors' tea. About 125 second-grade pupils at the Eldersburg school are published authors and illustrators. The 7-year-olds, dressed in their best, clutched their new releases and munched on chocolate-chip cookies. The books, which began with a dedication page, were printed on thick paper and bound in hard covers. A picture of the writer appeared on the front jacket with the title and name of the author; biographical information was on the last page.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1999
Crown Books Corp. has emerged from 16 months in Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection with a reorganization plan that includes discounted books and a "significant" Internet presence, but analysts predict a tough road ahead for the retailer.Steven Panagos, the Landover company's interim chief executive officer and a partner in the New York crisis management firm Zolfo Cooper LLC, said yesterday the reorganization plan cancels all of the company's old common stock.The company, which has 92 stores, will emerge debt-free by distributing 5 million shares of its new stock to its creditors.
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