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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 10, 2010
It is a large moment for Democrats, learning to stick with a good man through a rough period when the people who crave disillusionment have become disillusioned. It's like a winter vacation in the Caribbean when it rains buckets and you eat some bad shellfish and a shrieky teenager says you've ruined her life forever. You smile, take a shower and organize a volleyball game. You have to work at it. It's work. We the people are fond of hustlers and slick operators and the reverend with the diamond-studded Rolex and Sarah Palin slipping into Nashville and collecting a hundred grand for a 40-minute speech of no distinction whatsoever ("I'm so proud to be an American.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
To his friends and supporters, Eric T. Costello is just what the City Council needs: a smart, hard-working community president with financial experience that could save taxpayers money. To his critics, however, Costello is just what Baltimore doesn't need: an ambitious, sometimes volatile leader more interested in pleasing the powerful than his neighborhood's residents. Costello, 33, a New York native, has been a magnet for controversy during his relatively short tenure in Baltimore.
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NEWS
May 11, 2013
A forceful friend and an active advocate: These words describe my feelings about business and civic leader Richard E. Hug, whose hard work helped improve Maryland politics (May 7). As a volunteer participant in Bob Ehrlich's campaign for governor, I remember Dick Hug's 24/7 work in raising funds to help achieve election success. Citizen participation in a democracy means work, and that is the kind of volunteer participation and leadership that Mr. Hug gave. Thanks for his fine example.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Thank you for staying on top of Maryland's chicken companies for their unfair advantage in our state's politics ( "Perdue's ruffled feathers," Sept. 22). I've been an avid supporter of Food & Water Watch for many years and appreciate their hard work highlighting that not only does Jim Perdue "have a seat at the table," he also has a seat in the governor's mansion. It's time for "big chicken" to pay their fair share. Stephanie Compton, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
The chair I put in my cleared parking space during the last major snowstorm did not scream I was "uninterested in the public good" but rather of the hard work that went into clearing not only my spot but the three others I helped my neighbors dig out as well ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 19). Our band of snow shovelers was out together talking about how great it was to be able to see each other. And while we were moving that wet, heavy snow, we commented on the fact that we really didn't want to see a plow since we already had cleared everything from the curb to the center of the street.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
In regard to Dan Rodricks ' recent column on the minimum wage and tipped workers ( "Questioning wage law built on the kindness of strangers," April 18), I was following along with Dan's arguments up until his last sentence, "and I thought that in America we like to see extra effort rewarded. " In a previous paragraph, Mr. Rodricks laments the huge gap between the country's wealthiest 10 percent and everyone else and questions why we legally limit the amount of compensation food industry and hospitality workers might get. If he feels strongly, as he should, that the government should not be limiting the amount of money anyone can earn, why is he OK with limiting the amount that the wealthiest 10 percent earn through confiscatory and punitive taxes and tax rates?
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | April 18, 2012
Well. I know I speak for many women when I say, "Thank heaven that's settled. " Women like me have been struggling with our identities as working mothers for decades, but thanks to Hilary Rosen, Ann Romney and Hillary Clinton, we now have some clarity. Because of commentator Rosen's unfortunate choice of words (Ann Romney "never worked a day in her life"), we have it on the highest authority that raising children is, indeed, hard work. And because Hillary Clinton was caught knocking back a beer and dancing in a Colombia cantina while on summit duty, we now know it is impolite for a woman to drink beer from a bottle instead of a glass.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Lansdowne High School, according to indoor track coach Charles Pridee, had not scored a point in the Baltimore County indoor meet in more than a decade entering this season. But last weekend, the Vikings scored 32 points and finished fifth out of more than 20 teams. Leading the Vikes was junior Yelnats Calvin, who joined the team as a sophomore and who has become its leader. He won the 500 meters (1 minute, 11.10 seconds), finished second in the 300 and helped the 800-meter relay team to second place and the 1,600-meter relay team to third place.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | February 16, 2010
Mount St. Joseph's wrestling team won its 26th Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association wrestling championship on Monday, but the theme of the day was not the Gaels' dominance. Rather, it was the joy that came from seeing hard work by individuals and teams that are not always in the limelight succeed. John Carroll coach Keith Watson let out a big "Yes!" when he heard his team had finished second to Mount St. Joseph, 238.5-181. "Mount St. Joe is the Big Dog," Watson said.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The only thing that came easy for the No. 8 Calvert Hall soccer team in its 3-2 season-opening win at rival Archbishop Curley Friday was the game-winning goal. Sophomore forward Ben Alexander was right where he needed to be on the goal line, ready to tap it home. The score, which came with 15:30 left and answered a tying goal from the No. 9 Friars just two minutes earlier, was a deserved reward for all the hard work that preceded it. The Cardinals earned a free kick just outside the penalty area that Brady O'Connor sent to the middle.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Johns Hopkins isn't the only area Division III program with an untarnished record in 2014. Stevenson is 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Middle Atlantic Conference and earned votes in the latest American Football Coaches Association poll. It's the first time the program has won its first four games of the season, and the team has already matched single-season records in overall victories and league wins set last year. Considering that the Mustangs were 8-22 overall and 6-20 in the conference, the current run might be shocking to some, but not to coach Ed Hottle.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
NEW YORK -- Orioles first baseman-outfielder Steve Pearce said he expects to return to the starting lineup by Wednesday afternoon against the Yankees. Pearce was scratched from the starting lineup before Saturday's game against the Boston Red Sox with a sore right wrist. He had X-rays that night - which were negative - and also received a cortisone injection. Pearce wore a brace on his right wrist before Monday's game, but he said the wrist is feeling much better and the effects of the injection are taking place.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The only thing that came easy for the No. 8 Calvert Hall soccer team in its 3-2 season-opening win at rival Archbishop Curley Friday was the game-winning goal. Sophomore forward Ben Alexander was right where he needed to be on the goal line, ready to tap it home. The score, which came with 15:30 left and answered a tying goal from the No. 9 Friars just two minutes earlier, was a deserved reward for all the hard work that preceded it. The Cardinals earned a free kick just outside the penalty area that Brady O'Connor sent to the middle.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
A familiar process plays out each time you see the descendant of a baseball legend in an obscure minor league ballpark. It's something both observers and the player himself have to deal with - the realization that he is not his namesake, then the understanding that such a standard is unfair and, finally, an appreciation for all the things the new generation does well. Orioles minor league outfielder Mike Yastrzemski, grandson of Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski, has dealt with it all, and now he is earning notice for more than just his name.
SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Those close to Roscoe Smith share a favorite phrase. When speaking of Smith, a Baltimore native and 6-foot-8 Nevada-Las Vegas forward entered in Thursday's NBA draft, they repeat a pair of words, over and over. It's not necessarily a nickname, but his trainer, high school and college coaches all refer to Smith in one way or another as the epitome of a "hard worker. " Those two words find their way into sentences after his name because those around him say Smith is always the first player in the gym and the last to leave.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
By the time I entered the College of Notre Dame in the early 1960s, Sister Maura Eichner was already well known. Author of several books of poetry, she was friends with important literary figures like Flannery O'Connor, Karl Shapiro and Richard Wilbur - connections that were unusual for a woman teacher in the '60s - to say nothing of a nun garbed in a long black habit and veil. I had applied to be an English major with a writing concentration. This required a portfolio and a meeting with the department chair, Sister Maura.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When Nick Schauman was a toddler, his grandfather, Larry Hunton, taught him how to eat raw oysters. Hunton let his grandson tag along on trips to Lexington Market, where the duo would sit at the raw bar (Schauman sat on top of it) and slurp down oysters "faster than the man could shuck them. " Back then, ordering a dozen oysters simply meant asking for "oysters. " Forty years later, at oyster bars and fishmongers across the region, "boutique" oysters harvested from oyster farms - many of them local - are the norm.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
In regard to Dan Rodricks ' recent column on the minimum wage and tipped workers ( "Questioning wage law built on the kindness of strangers," April 18), I was following along with Dan's arguments up until his last sentence, "and I thought that in America we like to see extra effort rewarded. " In a previous paragraph, Mr. Rodricks laments the huge gap between the country's wealthiest 10 percent and everyone else and questions why we legally limit the amount of compensation food industry and hospitality workers might get. If he feels strongly, as he should, that the government should not be limiting the amount of money anyone can earn, why is he OK with limiting the amount that the wealthiest 10 percent earn through confiscatory and punitive taxes and tax rates?
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