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SPORTS
December 9, 2012
How did the Ravens lose on Sunday? Let me count the ways. Joe Flacco turned the ball over twice in the third quarter when they were in position to put the game away. The Ravens gave up a touchdown pass and a two-point conversion to somebody named Kirk Cousins in the final minute of the game while super rookie Robert Griffin III was licking his wounds on the sideline. The usually dependable special teams unit gave up a big punt return to set up a game-winning Redskins field goal in overtime.
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
With Russian troops amassed along its border and Kremlin-backed separatists in control of major cities in eastern Ukraine, the government in Kiev is facing the gravest threat to its survival since the breakup of the former Soviet Union a generation ago. Unless the U.S. and its allies can convince Russian President Vladimir Putin to step back from using the unrest there as a pretext for military intervention, it looks more likely than ever that eastern...
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 19, 2012
I think I owe an apology to George W. Bush. William F. Buckley once noted that he was 19 when the Cold War began at the Yalta conference. The year the Berlin Wall came down, he became a senior citizen. In other words, he explained, anti-Communism was a defining feature of conservatism his entire adult life. Domestically, meanwhile, the right was largely a "leave me alone coalition": Religious and traditional conservatives, overtaxed businessmen, Western libertarians, and others fed up with government social engineering and economic folly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
¿¿The past nips at 72-year-old blues singer Oscar Clifton day and night, especially night, when Viola, the woman he loved and lost 20 years earlier, seems to float back into his life on beams of moonlight. On such occasions, Oscar becomes a willing partner in what might be described as a “dance of the holy ghosts” - the no-caps title of an earnest, if not entirely satisfying, work by Marcus Gardley now on the boards at Center Stage. Gardley calls this “a play on memory,” and it's partially autobiographical.
EXPLORE
March 23, 2013
I was happy to see that Bond Mill Elementary has advanced to the state finals of DestinationImagination, according to Sarah Toth's article in your edition of March 21.  Bond Mill was a worthy competitor when our kids were in Odyssey of the Mind (OM), a similar program, and I see that that school is still at it. Our family was heavily involved in OM for a dozen years in the '80s and '90s.  For months each year our house was littered with art materials, tools and balsa wood.  Our teams were fortunate to get to the World Competition three times, representing Glenarden Woods Elementary, Kenmoore Middle and Eleanor Roosevelt High.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
¿¿The past nips at 72-year-old blues singer Oscar Clifton day and night, especially night, when Viola, the woman he loved and lost 20 years earlier, seems to float back into his life on beams of moonlight. On such occasions, Oscar becomes a willing partner in what might be described as a “dance of the holy ghosts” - the no-caps title of an earnest, if not entirely satisfying, work by Marcus Gardley now on the boards at Center Stage. Gardley calls this “a play on memory,” and it's partially autobiographical.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
NOT IN MY back yard. That was the overwhelming response of Mount Vernon-Belvedere residents to a proposal to house a program for jailed pregnant women in the city's cultural district. It was a hostile, rude display of NIMBYism over a project that many only learned about when work crews in orange prison jumpsuits showed up at a vacant rowhouse on Cathedral Street and concerned neighbors started calling each other. The reaction should have been expected: Mount Vernon-Belvedere leaders got official notice of the project only about a week before Tuesday's public meeting.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
Santonio Holmes had just one catch last Sunday and three the week before that, but if you are worried that the Ravens might overlook the New York Jets' speedy wide receiver Sunday night, you obviously have a selective memory. Ravens defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano does not. "He's been a Raven killer," Pagano said. "My nightmares, when I wake up in the middle of the night sweating, it's because I think of '08, the three losses [to the Pittsburgh Steelers]. He had a hand in all of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 8, 1991
Talk about nerve! "The Hard Way" has the moxie to lambast "typical Hollywood movies," full of phony stunts by bland twits; then, without a look back or a whisper of regret, it blithely turns into a typical Hollywood movie full of phony stunts by bland twits.There's a nugget of a kernel of a core of a good idea here, and when the movie hews to it, it's absolutely brilliant. But far too often, and finally fatally, it loses its concentration.The idea is the opposition between authentic experience and imagined experience and the movie yanks endless yuks out of the clash between them, as a hard-guy homicide cop (James Woods)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 24, 1992
Even though country recordings are climbing the pop charts the way rock releases used to, there are still significant differences between the expectations folks have for rock stars and the way things work over in Nashville.For instance, when a rock or R&B artist takes a couple years to complete an album, nobody gives it a second thought. Heck, a five year wait for a Bruce Springsteen or Def Leppard album is almost considered normal. In country circles, however, any album that takes more than a year to make is immediately marked "overdue," and that posed something of a problem for Clint Black's third album, "The Hard Way."
EXPLORE
March 23, 2013
I was happy to see that Bond Mill Elementary has advanced to the state finals of DestinationImagination, according to Sarah Toth's article in your edition of March 21.  Bond Mill was a worthy competitor when our kids were in Odyssey of the Mind (OM), a similar program, and I see that that school is still at it. Our family was heavily involved in OM for a dozen years in the '80s and '90s.  For months each year our house was littered with art materials, tools and balsa wood.  Our teams were fortunate to get to the World Competition three times, representing Glenarden Woods Elementary, Kenmoore Middle and Eleanor Roosevelt High.
SPORTS
December 9, 2012
How did the Ravens lose on Sunday? Let me count the ways. Joe Flacco turned the ball over twice in the third quarter when they were in position to put the game away. The Ravens gave up a touchdown pass and a two-point conversion to somebody named Kirk Cousins in the final minute of the game while super rookie Robert Griffin III was licking his wounds on the sideline. The usually dependable special teams unit gave up a big punt return to set up a game-winning Redskins field goal in overtime.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 19, 2012
I think I owe an apology to George W. Bush. William F. Buckley once noted that he was 19 when the Cold War began at the Yalta conference. The year the Berlin Wall came down, he became a senior citizen. In other words, he explained, anti-Communism was a defining feature of conservatism his entire adult life. Domestically, meanwhile, the right was largely a "leave me alone coalition": Religious and traditional conservatives, overtaxed businessmen, Western libertarians, and others fed up with government social engineering and economic folly.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
Santonio Holmes had just one catch last Sunday and three the week before that, but if you are worried that the Ravens might overlook the New York Jets' speedy wide receiver Sunday night, you obviously have a selective memory. Ravens defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano does not. "He's been a Raven killer," Pagano said. "My nightmares, when I wake up in the middle of the night sweating, it's because I think of '08, the three losses [to the Pittsburgh Steelers]. He had a hand in all of them.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | June 17, 2007
More than 100 years ago, Asa Candler introduced the first coupon in an effort to get people to try a new drink called Coca-Cola. Today, consumers still love their coupons although they're using fewer of them. Coupons remain a powerful way to find bargains, and some retailers that scaled them back have paid a price. And coupons still target a core group of customers for retailers and manufacturers. "Any way you can save money, I'm there," said Lorie Lawson, a 22-year-old cashier from Baltimore who uses coupons for a variety of products, including clothing from the Gap or Old Navy.
NEWS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
Toughness wasn't something Reggie Phifer saw in his nephew when Raynard Horne was a small child. "He was living with his mother and his grandmother, getting away with a lot of things. I felt he was kind of soft," Phifer said. "so I would try to toughen him up a bit. but every time I would try to horse around with him, he'd start crying." But as Horne developed, Phifer watched the soft touch disappear. "Before long, he would get to where he would start to hit back, try to take you down," Phifer said.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Special to The Sun | February 25, 1995
Archbishop Spalding coach Kristie Lilly said she couldn't have dreamed up a better scenario for yesterday's Catholic League quarterfinal game.Second seed St. Frances gave the seventh-seeded Cavaliers every chance to steal a victory, shooting dismally most of the game and committing 16 turnovers in the first half.It was everything an opposing coach could ask for. But on this day, it wasn't enough.Ninth-ranked St. Frances used its speed and athleticism to escape with a 49-31 victory at the College of Notre Dame.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | April 1, 2001
WASHINGTON -- History may well remember Jeffery Pollock as the candidate who censored himself. He didn't plan to do it. He merely fell prey, as politicians often do, to the age-old Law of Unintended Consequences. Mr. Pollock, a conservative Republican businessman in Portland, Ore., ran for Congress last year as a big foe of Internet pornography. He favored federal laws to mandate the use of Internet filtering software to block pornographic sites from computers used in schools and libraries.
SPORTS
By David Steele | February 7, 2005
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - They did it again. The Patriots got away with another one, made it look hard, made you want to say, "This is the dominant team of our time?" Hey, dominate somebody if you're so great. Or, not. They hadn't done it that way in the previous two Super Bowls. Adam Vinatieri's late field goals helped the Patriots win their previous two Super Bowls, and that fact is practically an afterthought with this team. Almost without exception, the Patriots do just enough to win, especially the last game.
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