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Hard Times

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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The Depression had Shirley Temple. This recession has … Kim Kardashian? Maybe every downturn gets the distraction it deserves. This has to be filed under the good news/bad news category: New figures are out showing that advertising has picked up at many magazines, among the industries hit hard by the recession, after steep declines in the past couple of years. But it's not all magazines. While newsstand mainstays like Newsweek and Forbes continued to struggle, particularly big jumps in ad pages came in the category of celebrity mags, those breathless trackers of the stars in all their dating, divorcing, drunken-driving glory.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2013
During the long Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union, when a spy from either side defected he was said to be "coming in from the cold. " In the evolving case of Edward Snowden, the self-described whistleblower on National Security Agency secrets, he seems to be having an uncommonly difficult time accomplishing it. His flight from his NSA surveillance job in Hawaii to Hong Kong, while causing shock and distress to the Obama administration, at first came off as another example of a fed-up insider deciding his country was in the wrong and letting let his conscience be his guide.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 17, 2012
Former Baltimore Ravens player Jermaine Lewis has apparently fallen on hard times. Remembered for returning a kickoff 84 yards for a touchdown in the 2001 Super Bowl, he now makes the headlines more for his arrests than his exploits on the field. His most recent brush with the law on Thursday in Baltimore County gives hints that the former star has fallen. According to a police report, after Lewis was pulled over after an officer saw an unrestrained child in the car, the former player said was driving on a suspended license because "he needed to get food for his son and something to heat his home.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Republicans and Democrats appear to agree on at least one thing: that the United States is facing a STEM (science, technology engineering and math) crisis. In his most recent State of the Union address, President Barack Obama declared that he wants to "reward schools" that focus on STEM classes, for they are "the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. " And as far to the other end of the political spectrum as you can get, Gov. Rick Perry of Texas deemed May 6-12 to be the first ever "Celebration of STEM Education Week in Texas.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 30, 1992
In New Jersey, it's the liberal Democratic congressman who won the governorship by a landslide and then ramrodded through $2.8 billion in new taxes. He had his political head handed to him last fall as Republicans rebounded to veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature. At last count, Gov. James Florio's voter approval rating stood at 26 percent -- a recovery of a few points since last year when it was at 17 percent.L But are big taxers the only governors in the political soup?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 15, 1991
President Bush may not concede there is an economic recession, but WJZ-Channel 13 is offering this weekend an unusual on-the-air campaign "to help Maryland families survive recession," in cooperation with local radio station WWIN-AM/FM (1400/95.9).Anchor Al Sanders is hosting "Hope In Hard Times," an hour-long special spawned by layoffs and budget cutbacks. It airs at 8 p.m. tomorrow and will be simulcast on the radio stations. (A repeat airing is also scheduled on Channel 13 at 10 a.m. Monday.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | October 5, 1992
WELCOME TO HARD TIMES. By E.L. Doctorow. Vintage International. 212 pages. $10.Over the last three decades, E.L. Doctorow has gained fame as the author of such novels as "Ragtime" and "Billy Bathgate." But "Welcome to Hard Times" was his first book, which came in 1960.Because the story takes place in the Old West, it looks like a Western, acts like a Western and was even made into a Western movie. Yet it isn't really a Western. The setting merely provides a backdrop for Mr. Doctorow's story of cowardice and hate.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | September 17, 1992
A gurgling fountain surrounded by palm trees adorns th atrium in front of the new Nordstrom department store in Towson Town Center mall.Cafe-style tables are grouped about the fountain and the palms, and a waiter in formal attire moves quietly from table to table, taking orders, tidying up.Patrons sip espresso, nibble at pastry.From a distant skylight, sunlight splashes the area.Ivory-colored columns line the walls.All told, I beheld a scene of genteel splendor."Hmm," I said as I approached the store with a friend.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
James Smith sat outside the Maryland National Bank building on Calvert Street, holding a plastic cup and a sign that detailed his plight: burned out of his home, injured in the fire, two grandchildren killed.Every word of it was true. But it happened in 1975 -- a fact that Smith readily shared after two quarters dropped into his cup.After all, 50 cents is a sizable donation in this economy, one of the largest Smith may have seen all day. And Smith -- with his hand-lettered tale of woe -- was having a better day than most panhandlers can count on in these hard times.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | December 18, 1991
Friends and colleagues may have thought Ernie Swanson had lost his mind a few months back.Amid a recession that has many car dealers tightening their belts and scrambling to reduce inventory, Mr. Swanson, owner of Lee Oldsmobile, a medium-size dealership in Glen Burnie, did the unthinkable.He ordered nearly 200 more cars from the factory and started a high-spirited promotion blitz that raised his advertising budget by 40 percent.It was a "tremendous gamble," Anthony P. Filice, Oldsmobile's local zone manager, said.
FEATURES
By Katie Mercado, For The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Something really important to me for the wedding is to make sure my mom is honored in a special way. As a little bit of background, my mom was a single mom most of my life and raised three kids (eventually four but the littlest came much later), while going to school and working full time. Somehow she managed to raise us all to be strong individuals who can succeed at anything we put our mind to. I think having to deal with hard times made her a better mom, and I wouldn't change a thing about how she raised me if I could.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Just a comment about Gov. Martin O'Malley's forecast of hard times for Maryland if sequestration comes to pass: Perhaps the governor should have been working harder all along to improve the industrial diversity in the state instead of working so hard to bring more and more government to Maryland. August J. Nicastro, Forest Hill
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
I know we have become a nation of such short attention spans and long-term addiction to instant gratification that asking viewers to spend even an hour with a documentary that could change the way they see the world is probably a fool's errand. But this fool is asking -- no begging -- you to see "Hard Times: Lost on Long Island," an HBO documentary premiering at 9 Monday night and repeating throughout the month on HBO and HBO2. I have not seen anything on-air, online or in print that so deftly nails one of the most important and least reported stories of our economic and political lives in this presidential election year.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
Growing up in Dundalk, Kent Mosmiller knew about Sparrows Point Country Club. He spent summers on little boats along Bear Creek where he could check out the 40-foot cabin cruisers at the club marina and, beyond that, the green expanse of the golf course. It wasn't for him or his family. The club was an enclave for what he called "white hats" at Bethlehem Steel, which established the club as a benefit for supervisors in the 1920s. Neither Mosmiller nor his parents ever worked for the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
She isn't quite 5 feet tall, but Kristin Chenoweth has achieved uncommon stature in show business, thanks to consistently sizzling performances on Broadway, including an indelible portrayal of Glinda in "Wicked"that earned her a Tony nomination, and several television shows. With just the slightest touch of hyperbole, "Glee"actor Chris Colfer neatly expressed Chenoweth's appeal after her guest appearance on that series, telling the Los Angeles Times that "working with Kristin is what I can imagine what a priest would go through if he worked with Jesus.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 17, 2012
Former Baltimore Ravens player Jermaine Lewis has apparently fallen on hard times. Remembered for returning a kickoff 84 yards for a touchdown in the 2001 Super Bowl, he now makes the headlines more for his arrests than his exploits on the field. His most recent brush with the law on Thursday in Baltimore County gives hints that the former star has fallen. According to a police report, after Lewis was pulled over after an officer saw an unrestrained child in the car, the former player said was driving on a suspended license because "he needed to get food for his son and something to heat his home.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff correspondents Mark Matthews, Gilbert Lewthwaite and Peter Honey contributed to this article | January 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush fought for his political life last night using the same battle cry against his new foe -- the deeply ailing economy -- that he took up last year against Iraq: "This will not stand."In a State of the Union address that has been called critical to his re-election, Mr. Bush outlined what he wants to do to end "hard times" and attempted to re-ignite the patriotic spirit that made the president last year's hero after the Persian Gulf war."We are going to lift this nation out of hard times inch by inch and day by day, and those who would stop us had best step aside," the president said, openly taunting the Democratic lawmakers assembled before him in a joint session of Congress.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
It's no secret that the character of Ed Easton in "Pink Slips and Parting Gifts" is based on Columbia founder James Rouse. And the white stucco architectural oddity that overlooks a man-made lake is clearly the undisguised former digs of the Rouse Co. First-time author Deb Hosey White, an ex-Rouse employee, further acknowledges that her general-fiction book was inspired by the General Growth Properties' purchase of the Rouse Co. in 2004. "Fact and fiction blend and flow together throughout the book," she said of the novel, published in August.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 15, 2011
I sat with Kate Schulz and Stephanie Halcott, social workers with headsets, as they answered pleas for help at the United Way of Central Maryland's fifth-floor 211 call center overlooking Lombard Street. People who've lost their jobs and who've contemplated suicide, people who've lost their homes and had to move into a relative's abode, people who've run out of food and money - they all call this place. More so, of course, since the Great Recession and its long, grinding aftermath.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 8, 2011
Something seemed not quite right the other evening while I stood at a Charles Street bus stop. There were just too many people purposefully moving about on the street at 7:30. Some carried grocery bags. Others were making runs to the wine shop. Some were on bicycles. Flip-flops were the footwear of choice. Charles Street had a steady stream of people — what I've heard called a critical mass, a buzz, a bustle. It was a good experience, but it nevertheless caught me off guard.
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