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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Update: The timing of the Cafe Hon's participation in the Habitat for Humanity's Women Build project, on the weekend it was being filmed for a "Kitchen Nightmares" episode, struck some observers as too coincidental. Surely, naysayers wondered (or came right out and said), the rehab shift was orchestrated by the producers of "Kitchen Nightmares," who would come down to film the Cafe Hon crew on the job site. On Saturday morning, I found the Hon crew -- employees, friends and longtime customers -- split between two Habitat for Humanity sites, one in Patterson Place and another a few blocks away in McElderry Park, where a corner house on Jefferson Street was being readied for a Monday morning dedication.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Normalcy remained elusive for the residents of the Charles Village block that collapsed in April even as they came back home this week. Construction still hums outside as workers rebuild East 26th Street and the wall that held it above adjacent railroad tracks. The block of neighbors on East 26th Street in between North Charles and St. Paul streets, so close-knit that they coordinated the pastel colors of their rowhouses, were allowed to return after more than a month of work to shore up the street and reconnect utilities.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 16, 1994
Starting time is 6:30 a.m. for a batch of young artists who wear gold-flecked hard hats to work.After ascending elevators to the 34th floor of the Maryland National Bank Building, they scale a grid of ladders to reach their work site -- the mansard-style roof of the landmark 1929 office building at 10 Light St. in downtown Baltimore.The roof is known as the bonnet, a name that newspapers gave this distinctive hood that tops the building that was the city's tallest when it opened.The roof is a 60-foot-high architectural hat -- something of a tiara -- majestic, steeply tapered and showing its age. For the past couple of months, this chapeau has been forced to wear a large metal scaffolding veil.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
As the rookie coach of the Towson women's basketball team, Niki Reid Geckeler understands - anticipates, in fact - that there will be growing pains for her players and coaches in the upcoming season. But that does not mean she has any intention of lowering her expectations. “You set a high bar from the beginning,” Reid Geckeler said at the Colonial Athletic Association women's basketball media day, held at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore on Tuesday. “I think any college athlete that is competitive wants that.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
OAKLAND, Calif. -- The Orioles took early batting practice yesterday in the new environment of the Oakland Coliseum, the sounds of hammers and drills and saws reverberating through the air.Construction on some additional seating and boxes is ongoing -- even through day games, even through batting practice, four huge cranes looming beyond the outfield. Balls hit beyond the left-field wall usually landed among construction workers, who were, luckily, all wearing hard hats."It's kind of weird," said Orioles utility man Jeff Huson.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | February 12, 1991
It was cold, blustery and muddy and absenteeism was high, but the few Baltimore Orioles who toured the Camden Yards stadium site yesterday were impressed by how far the project has come."
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Tracy Marcotte scanned a hand-held metal detector across various spots on the base of the Washington Monument as if she were searching for gold. But it was iron she was after. Specifically, she was searching for iron cramps that hold together stones that make up the monument. Marcotte was part of a team from Pennsylvania-based CVM engineers at the monument Saturday assessing the historic structure in preparation for a restoration to begin next spring. The $3 million restoration is the first project in a plan by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy to make improvements to Mount Vernon Square, which is made up of the monument and four public squares surrounding it. The conservancy was formed to raise money to improve and manage the site.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
As the rookie coach of the Towson women's basketball team, Niki Reid Geckeler understands - anticipates, in fact - that there will be growing pains for her players and coaches in the upcoming season. But that does not mean she has any intention of lowering her expectations. “You set a high bar from the beginning,” Reid Geckeler said at the Colonial Athletic Association women's basketball media day, held at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore on Tuesday. “I think any college athlete that is competitive wants that.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Wanted: Workers to hose down 150-foot flames in combat zones while covered in crude oil. Must have experience using explosives in 3,000-degree infernos that collapse steel oil rigs, cook sand into glass and melt boots and hard hats. The roughnecks who could answer such ads are keeping their bags packed. Defense officials say they'll be needed overseas if war breaks out and Saddam Hussein sets fire to Iraq's 1,500 oil wells, as he did in Kuwait in 1991. "We're fixin' to be going over" said Ronnie Roles, president of operations at Cudd Pressure Control, which extinguished some of the 732 blazing wells in Kuwait.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
When all the pomp and circumstance was over and the orange ribbon that had been spread across home plate was cut to officially open the new Ed Smith Stadium, the Orioles took the field and sparked hope that it wasn't all just window dressing. They were lucky they didn't break any windows in the process. Outfielder Nick Markakis, perhaps the face of the franchise, deposited two balls that bounced toward the player's parking lot past right field. Vladimir Guerrero, the Orioles' new slugger, hit one that nearly clipped the Tampa Bay Rays' team bus in left-center field, and multitalented center fielder Adam Jones cleared everything with a tape-measure shot to left.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Men and women wearing hairnets, hard hats, safety glasses and bright-orange vests wended their way through Domino Sugars' Baltimore refinery Tuesday - there to look, not work. The manufacturing engineers and engineering students toured Domino as part of an international conference in town this week, a chance for boosters to get people thinking of Baltimore-area manufacturing in present and future tense rather than past. The Society of Manufacturing Engineers says new-wave manufacturing - 3-D printing, specifically - is one reason officials decided to meet in Baltimore this year.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Tracy Marcotte scanned a hand-held metal detector across various spots on the base of the Washington Monument as if she were searching for gold. But it was iron she was after. Specifically, she was searching for iron cramps that hold together stones that make up the monument. Marcotte was part of a team from Pennsylvania-based CVM engineers at the monument Saturday assessing the historic structure in preparation for a restoration to begin next spring. The $3 million restoration is the first project in a plan by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy to make improvements to Mount Vernon Square, which is made up of the monument and four public squares surrounding it. The conservancy was formed to raise money to improve and manage the site.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Update: The timing of the Cafe Hon's participation in the Habitat for Humanity's Women Build project, on the weekend it was being filmed for a "Kitchen Nightmares" episode, struck some observers as too coincidental. Surely, naysayers wondered (or came right out and said), the rehab shift was orchestrated by the producers of "Kitchen Nightmares," who would come down to film the Cafe Hon crew on the job site. On Saturday morning, I found the Hon crew -- employees, friends and longtime customers -- split between two Habitat for Humanity sites, one in Patterson Place and another a few blocks away in McElderry Park, where a corner house on Jefferson Street was being readied for a Monday morning dedication.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
When all the pomp and circumstance was over and the orange ribbon that had been spread across home plate was cut to officially open the new Ed Smith Stadium, the Orioles took the field and sparked hope that it wasn't all just window dressing. They were lucky they didn't break any windows in the process. Outfielder Nick Markakis, perhaps the face of the franchise, deposited two balls that bounced toward the player's parking lot past right field. Vladimir Guerrero, the Orioles' new slugger, hit one that nearly clipped the Tampa Bay Rays' team bus in left-center field, and multitalented center fielder Adam Jones cleared everything with a tape-measure shot to left.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Wanted: Workers to hose down 150-foot flames in combat zones while covered in crude oil. Must have experience using explosives in 3,000-degree infernos that collapse steel oil rigs, cook sand into glass and melt boots and hard hats. The roughnecks who could answer such ads are keeping their bags packed. Defense officials say they'll be needed overseas if war breaks out and Saddam Hussein sets fire to Iraq's 1,500 oil wells, as he did in Kuwait in 1991. "We're fixin' to be going over" said Ronnie Roles, president of operations at Cudd Pressure Control, which extinguished some of the 732 blazing wells in Kuwait.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
OAKLAND, Calif. -- The Orioles took early batting practice yesterday in the new environment of the Oakland Coliseum, the sounds of hammers and drills and saws reverberating through the air.Construction on some additional seating and boxes is ongoing -- even through day games, even through batting practice, four huge cranes looming beyond the outfield. Balls hit beyond the left-field wall usually landed among construction workers, who were, luckily, all wearing hard hats."It's kind of weird," said Orioles utility man Jeff Huson.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Normalcy remained elusive for the residents of the Charles Village block that collapsed in April even as they came back home this week. Construction still hums outside as workers rebuild East 26th Street and the wall that held it above adjacent railroad tracks. The block of neighbors on East 26th Street in between North Charles and St. Paul streets, so close-knit that they coordinated the pastel colors of their rowhouses, were allowed to return after more than a month of work to shore up the street and reconnect utilities.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- The holiday weekend began early for heavy equipment operators, whose work was scheduled to stop at 3 p.m. yesterday, but lacrosse fans are nonetheless warned that they're heading into a construction site for the NCAA tournament at Byrd Stadium."
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