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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
A Baltimore law firm lost a portable hard drive containing information about its cases, including medical records for 161 stent patients suing cardiologist Dr. Mark G. Midei, a firm client, for alleged malpractice at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. The drive was lost Aug. 4 by an employee of Baxter, Baker, Sidle, Conn & Jones who was traveling on the Baltimore light rail, according to a letter obtained by The Baltimore Sun that was sent to one of the stent patients last week — two months after the drive went missing.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | March 15, 2014
Larissa Carter scored a basket after a missed shot with 28 seconds remaining to give Coppin State a 57-55 win over North Carolina A&T in the semifinal of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference tournament at The Scope in Norfolk, Va. The third-seeded Eagles (17-13), will take on top-seeded Hampton in the championship game Saturday at 3 pm. The teams went back and forth in the first 20 minutes. The game featured six ties and six lead changes. After Coppin State's Kyra Coleman's two free throws that tied the score for the sixth time, the Aggies (24-6)
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NEWS
Liz F. Kay | October 11, 2011
The 161 patients of Dr. Mark G. Midei who are party to a malpractice suit against the cardiologist may have had their personal information compromised as a result of the security practices of a Baltimore law firm, reports Tricia Bishop. According to the story, an employee of Baxter, Baker, Sidle, Conn & Jones, which represents Midei, lost a hard drive with back-up information, which was "taken home nightly as a security precaution in case of fire or flood, a firm spokesman said, though the portable information was not encrypted -   among the most stringent security precautions that is standard practice for health professionals dealing with medical records.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
A man who stole personal data of thousands of Baltimore County employees while working as a information technology contract worker was identified Wednesday after being extradited from Florida. Baltimore County police said Courtney Calbert, 34, of Dundalk made off with employees' banking information, Social Security numbers, and other personal information when he worked for a county contractor between December 2011 and July 2012. County officials have said more than 12,000 current and former county workers are affected.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | April 13, 1997
WHEN YOU bought that new computer a couple of years ago, you probably thought its 500-megabyte hard disk would last forever.Of course, that's what I thought when I bought my first 20-megabyte hard disk back in 1984.But I quickly found out that hard drives obey the Law of Closets: the stuff you accumulate will expand to fill the space available -- and then some.Millions of otherwise serviceable computers today are suffering from space crunch. Their owners learn about it the hard way, when they try to install a new program and get a message that says there isn't enough room on the hard drive.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | February 3, 1992
A hard disk drive is never more than one second away from disaster. A power fluctuation, a computer virus, a faulty circuit, a corrupted file, a hard knock on the desk, a burglar, an infestation of gremlins -- any one of them can render your hard disk as useless as a stone, sending data into oblivion.Luckily, you have a current backup. You DO have a backup, don't you?Gulp.Backing up a hard disk is the process of copying all or some of its files onto another disk or tape. It does not help to copy files from one part of the hard disk to another part of the same hard disk.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 1, 2011
I am not a hoarder, I can say with authority. But then I start feeling like Richard "I am not a crook" Nixon. Hoarding can be a matter of degree, and although I do not have a room full of empty pizza boxes, I do have a box of cassette tapes and another of record albums, and we no longer have a cassette player or a turntable. I spent a recent Saturday clearing out junk from my back basement, and afterward felt an incredible lightness of being. But I was unable to let go of my cross-stitch projects and the box of 125 different colors of thread.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Gallo and James Gallo,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
While computers have the ability to bring home users endless entertainment, and fun, anyone who owns one knows that without proper care, computers also offer equal amounts of frustration. That is precisely why people should protect their investment with routine maintenance. In an age of rampant viruses, spyware and browser hijackings, most owners know that they should have a virus program, spyware catcher and firewall. Routine cleaning of the fans, defragmenting the hard drives and making sure you use the "Check Disk" feature from time to time can stave off minor and major problems on a Windows-based PC. Disk defragmenting is an important aspect of helping your computer to run smoothly, according to Microsoft.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
In recent years, album release dates haven't mattered as much as "leak" days have. That trend continued when the compilation album from Kanye West and his G.O.O.D. Music clique - "Cruel Summer," an odd name for a record that will hit stores on Tuesday, five days before fall begins - hit the Internet while most of us were sleeping last night. You won't find a link here, but if you're good with the Google, you should have no problem finding it. There's always iTunes, too. We've heard the singles - the ubiquitous "Mercy" has been banging out of cars for months and "New God Flow" (now with a wonderful Ghostface Killah verse tacked on at the end)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2001
If you're a couch potato, get yourself a comfy office chair as well, because these days you can sit at your computer and participate in America's favorite pastime - watching television. With hardware such as ATI Technologies' Radeon All-In-Wonder video card, you'll also have more control over what you watch - and when you watch it - than with a regular television. As I write this, I'm flipping through dozens of cable channels with my PC mouse. The picture quality is good, and any time I want to, I can hit the "record" button on my screen to start "taping" the show on my hard disk.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Baltimore County authorities say they found Social Security numbers and other personal information from more than 12,000 current and former county workers on the computer of a man who used to work for a county information-technology contractor. The man is in custody in another state and is to be extradited to Maryland to face charges in an unrelated identity-theft case. Police say the hard drive on a personal computer seized by authorities contains information that includes county employees' home addresses, salaries, leave balances and county identification numbers.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, Justin Fenton and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita A. Levy wrote an apology letter to his wife before wrapping a plastic bag around his head Monday and pumping it with helium, killing himself in the basement of his Towson-area home, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the investigation. Along with the letter, he left behind multiple hard drives, computers and servers that police have seized and are scrutinizing, police said. More than 300 of Levy's current and former patients have contacted officers, fearing that they are pictured in images he is accused of secretly capturing, Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said Wednesday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
A 25-year-old Gambrills man was sentenced Tuesday to eight years in prison for possession of child pornography, including images depicting "sadistic and violent conduct" toward children, according to prosecutors. Robert Jay Hudson II, who pleaded guilty to the charge in July, will also have to serve 40 years of supervised release after his incarceration and be registered as a sex offender wherever he lives, works or attends school, the office of Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
In recent years, album release dates haven't mattered as much as "leak" days have. That trend continued when the compilation album from Kanye West and his G.O.O.D. Music clique - "Cruel Summer," an odd name for a record that will hit stores on Tuesday, five days before fall begins - hit the Internet while most of us were sleeping last night. You won't find a link here, but if you're good with the Google, you should have no problem finding it. There's always iTunes, too. We've heard the singles - the ubiquitous "Mercy" has been banging out of cars for months and "New God Flow" (now with a wonderful Ghostface Killah verse tacked on at the end)
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
A 25-year-old Gambrills man pleaded guilty Tuesday to possession of child pornography after Anne Arundel County police located hundreds of images of prepubescent children on computers and other digital storage devices in his home, according to the office of Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. Many of the images Robert Jay Hudson II had collected contained "sadistic and violent conduct" against children, including the rape of toddlers, prosecutors said. According to the plea agreement, police were first notified that Hudson possessed child pornography in April 2011, after he let someone use his computer and that person saw the images.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
See some asparagus, snap it. See some peas, shoot them. When you're out at the farmers market this weekend, take some photographs and send them to us. That way, we can all follow the growing season in real time. Even better, we can look back next year and see what came when. You can upload your photographs from your a hard drive of directly from Facebook here. There's room for you to give caption information telling us where and when you snapped your beautiful images.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 2, 1998
I started getting X-rated e-mail on AOL out of the clear blue. I can't imagine where they came from, but I need to stop them immediately. My children use this computer and e-mail.You should log on to America Online, type in Control + K for Keyword Search and type in Mail Controls. Many options are available in the windows that follow.You can order all e-mail addressed to your account shut off. Another choice lets you stipulate which e-mail senders' notes will reach you, causing all others to be rejected.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | September 28, 1998
My daughter is off to school at the University of Michigan. In trying to install the Ethernet card she needs to get online at school, I discovered that the screw heads in the back of the computer are stripped and I cannot get in there.When this happens to me, I break out my Sears 3/8-inch power drill, stick a carbide bit in the chuck and drill the screw out. The chrome-plated screws used on most PCs are soft enough to drill away.I understand there is technology out there today that will, in effect, copy images from old Super 8 and videocam tapes directly onto CDs, and that PCs can serve as the hardware for this transfer.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
The National Security Agency says it found top-secret information on hard drives that were seized in a failed espionage probe, and the agency is refusing to release the computers — despite the continued protests of their owners. In court filings in Baltimore this week, the government says the seized computers "cannot lawfully be returned. " NSA's deputy chief of staff for signals intelligence concluded that disclosing the contents of one computer hard drive would "cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security.
NEWS
Liz F. Kay | October 11, 2011
The 161 patients of Dr. Mark G. Midei who are party to a malpractice suit against the cardiologist may have had their personal information compromised as a result of the security practices of a Baltimore law firm, reports Tricia Bishop. According to the story, an employee of Baxter, Baker, Sidle, Conn & Jones, which represents Midei, lost a hard drive with back-up information, which was "taken home nightly as a security precaution in case of fire or flood, a firm spokesman said, though the portable information was not encrypted -   among the most stringent security precautions that is standard practice for health professionals dealing with medical records.
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