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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 1998
HAVANA -- The joke going around town these days is that Pope John Paul II is coming to Cuba this week to see three things: He wants to meet the devil, visit hell and witness a people living by a miracle.The devil is 70-year-old President Fidel Castro. Hell is the condition of life for many people. And the miracle is that the place is holding together as well as it is.The glue that is keeping the country together is tourism and the dollars it is bringing in, despite an ever-tightening U.S. trade embargo.
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NEWS
By Bay Fang and Bay Fang,Chicago Tribune | March 11, 2007
WASHINGTON --The United Nations Development Programme office in Pyongyang, North Korea, sits in a Soviet-style compound. Like clockwork, a North Korean official wearing a standard-issue dark windbreaker and slacks would come to the door each business day. He would take a manila envelope stuffed with cash -- a healthy portion of the U.N.'s disbursements for aid projects in the country -- and leave without ever providing receipts. According to sources at the U.N., this went on for years, resulting in the transfer of up to $150 million in hard foreign currency to the Kim Jong Il government at a time when the United States was trying to keep the North Korean government from receiving hard currency as part of its sanctions against the Kim regime.
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NEWS
By Carlos Rafael Rodriguez | December 6, 1990
HavanaTHE WORD to define Cuba's relationship with the Soviet Union is uncertainty. We don't know what will happen in the long run. The only certainty is that, in the immediate future, the situation will worsen.As a result of the U.S. trade embargo, Cuba conducts 70 percent of its total trade with the U.S.S.R. and gets 90 percent of its oil from the Soviets. So we are prepared for the worst, for what I estimate will be five to six very difficult years ahead.We must adjust to the changes in the world, hoping that the Soviet Union can sustain and reconsolidate itself while we put in place our own alternatives.
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2006
MACAU -- For decades, this former Portuguese colony was renowned as a haunt of counterfeiters, drug runners and spies. Banks here handled millions of dollars on behalf of North Korea's government, which long has been accused by the United States of selling illegal drugs to raise hard currency. The nation's founder, Kim Il Sung, and his son, current leader Kim Jong Il, allegedly kept their ill-gotten gains in Macau. But now the welcome mat has been rolled up and the North Koreans, who didn't have many friends to begin with, find themselves distinctly unwelcome in this autonomously governed Chinese territory.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | November 3, 1990
MOSCOW -- Coolly defying President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Moscow leaders authorized yesterday two anti-Communist rallies to compete with the traditional Red Square military parade and Communist demonstration on Wednesday.The Presidium of the U.S.S.R. Supreme Soviet, with Mr. Gorbachev's vocal backing, called for the cancellation Thursday all alternative rallies in Moscow on the 73rd anniversary of the ,, Bolsheviks' seizure of power. It asked the Moscow City Council to let political organizations know about the decree.
NEWS
By Bay Fang and Bay Fang,Chicago Tribune | March 11, 2007
WASHINGTON --The United Nations Development Programme office in Pyongyang, North Korea, sits in a Soviet-style compound. Like clockwork, a North Korean official wearing a standard-issue dark windbreaker and slacks would come to the door each business day. He would take a manila envelope stuffed with cash -- a healthy portion of the U.N.'s disbursements for aid projects in the country -- and leave without ever providing receipts. According to sources at the U.N., this went on for years, resulting in the transfer of up to $150 million in hard foreign currency to the Kim Jong Il government at a time when the United States was trying to keep the North Korean government from receiving hard currency as part of its sanctions against the Kim regime.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 23, 1990
MAE SAM LAEP, Thailand -- On the steep banks of the Salween River, which forms the border with Myanmar (formerly Burma), this small Thai town is having something of a timber boom.All around it the world's last great stand of teak forest is being ravaged to help finance Myanmar's military government and its long border war against ethnic insurgents.Every day now in the dry season, when the muddy roads through the mountains are more easily passable,rafts of teak logs come floating down the river.
BUSINESS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1992
BELGRADE -- Bank advertisements this week in Belgrade newspapers poignantly explained the surreal atmosphere created by the former Yugoslavia's civil war.Belgrade, it seems, is El Dorado for anyone with money to invest. Private banks which have sprung up over the past two years are offering fantastic yields "without risk."On local currency, they pay 75 percent on 30-day deposits, 100 percent a month for six-month deposits.For customers with hard currency -- German marks, Swiss francs, U.S. dollars, Austrian shillings --30-day yields range between 11 and 12 percent.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 21, 1990
MOSCOW -- Soviet newspapers and magazines, already hit hard by a paper shortage, may have to halt publication within two or three weeks because of a critical deficit of printer's ink, the head of the country's largest publishing house said yesterday."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 7, 2004
IT'S TIME WE started a new American tradition: Declare victory when victory has been achieved, and then go home. When it comes to the island nation that lies 90 miles south of our shores, we don't seem to be able to do that. President after president, from Dwight D. Eisenhower through George W. Bush, has treated Cuba as a pariah and Fidel Castro as the Antichrist. There may have been some logic to that back in the days of the Cold War, when the Soviet Union armed Cuba and, at one time, put missiles aimed at America on the island.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 7, 2004
IT'S TIME WE started a new American tradition: Declare victory when victory has been achieved, and then go home. When it comes to the island nation that lies 90 miles south of our shores, we don't seem to be able to do that. President after president, from Dwight D. Eisenhower through George W. Bush, has treated Cuba as a pariah and Fidel Castro as the Antichrist. There may have been some logic to that back in the days of the Cold War, when the Soviet Union armed Cuba and, at one time, put missiles aimed at America on the island.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 1998
HAVANA -- The joke going around town these days is that Pope John Paul II is coming to Cuba this week to see three things: He wants to meet the devil, visit hell and witness a people living by a miracle.The devil is 70-year-old President Fidel Castro. Hell is the condition of life for many people. And the miracle is that the place is holding together as well as it is.The glue that is keeping the country together is tourism and the dollars it is bringing in, despite an ever-tightening U.S. trade embargo.
NEWS
By Susan Milligan and Susan Milligan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 1997
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- In the hospitals, doctors have stopped performing all but emergency surgery because they don't have anesthesia or the money to buy it." 'Urgency' becomes a very relative term," says Dr. Slavyan Nikolov, a surgeon whose salary at First City Hospital is $10 a month. "There is no medicine. People without money have no options."The same diagnosis applies to all of Bulgaria, where a critical economic situation and political unrest have almost paralyzed the country. There is hyper-inflation, which means that Bulgarians without hard currency can barely afford to eat. The banking system has collapsed.
NEWS
By BRENDAN MURPHY | April 16, 1995
One of these days, the U.S. dollar could take a severe monetary caning at the hands of the Singaporean central bank. Or Bank Negara, the Malaysian monetary authority known at times for predatory forays into the $1 trillion-a-day global foreign exchange market. Even cautious Taiwan's central bank could take a whack at the buck.Last week, the dollar was still reeling from its latest sharp falls, against the Japanese yen in particular. It dropped to a post-World War II low of 80 yen to the dollar before bouncing.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- NHL players with ties to the former Soviet Union are being pressured to pay protection money to guarantee their families safety, including one incident that is being investigated by the Los Angeles Police Department, according to reports Thursday and Friday.The players are denying the allegations, although it is unclear whether they are doing it out of fear of reprisals or because those incidents have been exaggerated.The Vancouver Province on Friday quoted city police sources as saying Canucks right wing Pavel Bure has been a target of organized crime groups and had made two payments to a man who had befriended Russian players.
BUSINESS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1992
BELGRADE -- Bank advertisements this week in Belgrade newspapers poignantly explained the surreal atmosphere created by the former Yugoslavia's civil war.Belgrade, it seems, is El Dorado for anyone with money to invest. Private banks which have sprung up over the past two years are offering fantastic yields "without risk."On local currency, they pay 75 percent on 30-day deposits, 100 percent a month for six-month deposits.For customers with hard currency -- German marks, Swiss francs, U.S. dollars, Austrian shillings --30-day yields range between 11 and 12 percent.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | March 29, 1992
BELGRADE -- After a lifetime's work abroad and accumulated savings of almost $1 million, Ilija Ruzic last year decided that it was time to patter off into a comfortable retirement in the rolling hills of southern Serbia.He sold his Paris home, took all his savings and returned to his native village, where he built his dream house with all modern conveniences and a garage for two cars.He deposited the rest of his money -- one million in Swiss francs -- with Yugoslav banks.At age 59, he planned to use his luxurious setup to do everything that he had secretly wanted to do: chase butterflies, make his own wines, prepare French food and take occasional trips back to France -- Mr. Ruzic is a naturalized French citizen -- to see old friends from the Marcel Dessault company, where he was an aircraft test mechanic for more than three decades.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | December 11, 1991
Washington -- A couple of summers ago, a Washington political scientist got his 15 minutes of fame by asserting that the collapse of communism signaled ''the end of history.'' To him, what is happening in the former Soviet Union today must be a mere epilogue to all that mattered. But to millions there, it looks frighteningly like the the prologue to another volume of starvation and civil war.To Americans at home, one of those viewpoints seems as remote as the other -- one obscure in dippy theory, the other in distant geography.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | March 29, 1992
BELGRADE -- After a lifetime's work abroad and accumulated savings of almost $1 million, Ilija Ruzic last year decided that it was time to patter off into a comfortable retirement in the rolling hills of southern Serbia.He sold his Paris home, took all his savings and returned to his native village, where he built his dream house with all modern conveniences and a garage for two cars.He deposited the rest of his money -- one million in Swiss francs -- with Yugoslav banks.At age 59, he planned to use his luxurious setup to do everything that he had secretly wanted to do: chase butterflies, make his own wines, prepare French food and take occasional trips back to France -- Mr. Ruzic is a naturalized French citizen -- to see old friends from the Marcel Dessault company, where he was an aircraft test mechanic for more than three decades.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | December 11, 1991
Washington -- A couple of summers ago, a Washington political scientist got his 15 minutes of fame by asserting that the collapse of communism signaled ''the end of history.'' To him, what is happening in the former Soviet Union today must be a mere epilogue to all that mattered. But to millions there, it looks frighteningly like the the prologue to another volume of starvation and civil war.To Americans at home, one of those viewpoints seems as remote as the other -- one obscure in dippy theory, the other in distant geography.
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