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NEWS
August 29, 2013
How do you differentiate between the first 100,000 Syrians killed and the next 200? This has been a travesty for years, and now our non-leader draws a line and has to step up ( "Punishing Syria," Aug. 26). Moreover, now we are, in effect, backing Al Qaeda too. We really have them on the run now! If this was a George Bush concoction, a very different editorial would have been written. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
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NEWS
June 20, 2014
There are certainly hard choices in Iraq ( "Hard choices in Iraq," June 16). Although you didn't mention it, the lack of foresight by the George W. Bush administration to have an "exit" strategy in this war is the main cause. President Barack Obama didn't help by not demanding a Status of Forces Agreement. The big issue now is that Mr. Obama spends more time playing golf and fundraising than tending to his duties, but I am sure Valerie Jarrett is on top of this. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
March 11, 2010
Much thanks to Ron Smith for his article about New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's decision to stop putting off fixing the deficit ("A leader opts for painful honesty in the Garden State," March 5). With so many politicians trying to put off making hard decisions for someone else, it is great to see someone recognized for taking responsibility. Mr. Smith said that this is important and he's right. People might not like Mr. Christie for his decision, but a major reason for the recession we're in right now is that people spent money they didn't have.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
The lightening takeover of large parts of Syria and western Iraq last week by Sunni Muslim extremists has totally scrambled U.S. efforts to deal with a burgeoning conflict that threatens to engulf the entire region - and the situation got worse over the weekend when the insurgents announced they had murdered some 1,700 Shiite soldiers captured in the areas they control. The challenge for the Obama administration is that there are no good options to protect our immediate interest in halting the insurgents' advance that don't also work at cross-purposes to our long-term policy goals there.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 7, 1993
Washington.--Since the House vote to raise taxes considerably and cut spending slightly, the Democratic wing of the political class is preening about the ''hard choices'' it made. It chose to preserve every program, prune a few, and grasp a larger share of taxpayers' resources.The honey subsidy (a relic of the Second World War, when honey was a sugar substitute and beeswax was used for waterproofing) survived. The wool subsidy (a relic of the immediate postwar period, when the military worried about having enough wool for uniforms)
NEWS
By CAROL COX WAIT | February 4, 1992
Washington -- Record high deficits are the single most important problem facing economic policy makers today. In this election-recession year politicians unable to resist the siren song of tax cuts and pump-priming spending increases may make the deficit problem worse. In that context, the president's budget is a surprisingly responsible document.The budget does contain some creative accounting and blue smoke and mirrors. That is bad budget practice and bad politics. It is bad budget practice because everyone who wants deeper tax cuts or higher spending will adopt and expand the gimmicks in the budget to create the illusion such proposals won't increase the deficit.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
There are certainly hard choices in Iraq ( "Hard choices in Iraq," June 16). Although you didn't mention it, the lack of foresight by the George W. Bush administration to have an "exit" strategy in this war is the main cause. President Barack Obama didn't help by not demanding a Status of Forces Agreement. The big issue now is that Mr. Obama spends more time playing golf and fundraising than tending to his duties, but I am sure Valerie Jarrett is on top of this. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 30, 1991
Environmental Protection Agency chief William Reilly, heretofore a champion of the Earth, has come out with a worrisome pronouncement:"I do not intend to include 60 percent of North Carolina or 40 percent of Maryland's Eastern Shore as wetlands," he told the House Public Works Committee. That was in response to a storm of criticism raised by farmers, landowners and developers over the language of a 1989 Army Corps of Engineers manual which widely increased the number of property owners whose land might be subject to wetlands regulation.
NEWS
December 17, 2006
With tax revenues continuing to fall short of projections, Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley is under increasing pressure to curb promised new spending. That's not necessarily bad advice. Until the state's structural deficit is addressed, and a projected multibillion-dollar budget shortfall is no longer looming, fiscal restraint is in order. But there is at least one program where Mr. O'Malley needs to stick to his pledge to spend substantially more money next year: school construction. As a candidate for governor, Baltimore's mayor said he would set aside $400 million to help build and renovate public schools and $250 million annually after that.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 1998
LIMERICK, Ireland -- When it comes to giving peace a boost on the Irish island, there's nothing like a visit by President Clinton.During his three-day all-Ireland barnstorming tour that ended yesterday, Clinton emerged as the No. 1 cheerleader -- and backer -- of the historic Northern Ireland peace accord. He lectured often bitter political foes. He warned the public that there could be more bombs like the blast Aug. 15 in Omagh, the bloodiest attack of Northern Ireland's terrorist troubles.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
How do you differentiate between the first 100,000 Syrians killed and the next 200? This has been a travesty for years, and now our non-leader draws a line and has to step up ( "Punishing Syria," Aug. 26). Moreover, now we are, in effect, backing Al Qaeda too. We really have them on the run now! If this was a George Bush concoction, a very different editorial would have been written. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
NEWS
May 13, 2011
When the Chesapeake Bay Bridge (now properly known as the William Preston Lane Jr. Memorial Bridge) opened in 1952, motorists paid $2.80 for a round-trip. Had that Opening Day toll been tied to inflation, the same commute would cost $23.61 today. That's one perspective on the Maryland Transportation Authority's proposed toll increases, which would raise the Bay Bridge toll from $2.50 to $8 and double tolls on other MdTA facilities, including the Baltimore Harbor crossings. Here's another: The state borrowed too heavily to build the Intercounty Connector and now motorists everywhere are going to be penalized for that mistake.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Mary Gail Hare and Baltimore Sun reporters | March 29, 2010
The Cardinal Gibbons School is due to close in June, but sophomore Brady Fischer can't see trading Crusaders red for the purple togs of the rival Gaels of nearby Mount St. Joseph High School. His parents, meanwhile, have overruled his proposal to enroll at Archbishop Spalding in Severn, at least partly because, like Gibbons, it's operated by the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and they're still angry that the archdiocese is shutting Gibbons down. "I'm not giving them a penny," Jayne Fischer said.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
Much thanks to Ron Smith for his article about New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's decision to stop putting off fixing the deficit ("A leader opts for painful honesty in the Garden State," March 5). With so many politicians trying to put off making hard decisions for someone else, it is great to see someone recognized for taking responsibility. Mr. Smith said that this is important and he's right. People might not like Mr. Christie for his decision, but a major reason for the recession we're in right now is that people spent money they didn't have.
NEWS
By Lawrence Harrison | June 1, 2009
Palo Alto, Calif. -President Barack Obama has encouraged Americans to start laying a new foundation for the country - on a number of fronts. He has stressed that we'll need to have the courage to make some hard choices. One of those hard choices is how to handle immigration. The U.S. must get serious about the tide of legal and illegal immigrants, above all from Latin America. It's not just a short-run issue of immigrants competing with citizens for jobs as unemployment approaches 10 percent, or the number of uninsured straining the quality of healthcare.
NEWS
By Matt Welch | August 19, 2007
Hard Call Great Decisions and the Extraordinary People Who Made Them By John McCain with Mark Salter Twelve / 460 pages / $25.99 Eight years ago, in a presidential campaign far, far away, Republican candidate John McCain released his first book, the rightly acclaimed early-years autobiography Faith of My Fathers. Written with the help of aide Mark Salter, Faith was a delightfully profane redemption tale of how an underachieving, hard-living Navy brat was broken, then made stronger, during his captivity in Vietnam.
NEWS
By Lawrence Harrison | June 1, 2009
Palo Alto, Calif. -President Barack Obama has encouraged Americans to start laying a new foundation for the country - on a number of fronts. He has stressed that we'll need to have the courage to make some hard choices. One of those hard choices is how to handle immigration. The U.S. must get serious about the tide of legal and illegal immigrants, above all from Latin America. It's not just a short-run issue of immigrants competing with citizens for jobs as unemployment approaches 10 percent, or the number of uninsured straining the quality of healthcare.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 23, 1994
Washington. -- Democrats are trying to revive their flagging spirits and reverse their sagging fortunes by attacking the ''contract'' that Republican congressional candidates have signed. The core of the contract is a constitutional amendment to require a balanced budget, an idea many Democrats and much of the intelligentsia call ''simplistic.''But now comes James Q. Wilson, past president of the American Political Science Association and no simpleton, defending the amendment as a sound response to the current tensions between American's political and constitutional systems.
NEWS
By Article by Abigail Tucker and Article by Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
His memories gathered rain. The Christmas ornaments, the baseball card collection, the baby blankets his mother had boxed and labeled with marker and masking tape - Tyler Krus' whole childhood was spread out on the front lawn, getting drenched in a sudden August shower. "Nick!" 17-year-old Tyler yelled, his voice brittle with stress. "I told you not to put this stuff out here!" Nick, 15, sprinted out of the house. Together the brothers struggled to drag moving boxes and furniture across the grass to the dry porch.
NEWS
December 17, 2006
With tax revenues continuing to fall short of projections, Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley is under increasing pressure to curb promised new spending. That's not necessarily bad advice. Until the state's structural deficit is addressed, and a projected multibillion-dollar budget shortfall is no longer looming, fiscal restraint is in order. But there is at least one program where Mr. O'Malley needs to stick to his pledge to spend substantially more money next year: school construction. As a candidate for governor, Baltimore's mayor said he would set aside $400 million to help build and renovate public schools and $250 million annually after that.
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