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SPORTS
By Jennifer Frey and Jennifer Frey,Knight-Ridder | June 11, 1991
In the end, this National League expansion race didn't hing on time zones or climates or appeasements for the American League. Miami's rain didn't matter. Neither did Colorado's high elevation and thin air.And, much as St. Petersburg would like to find consolation in an American League conspiracy theory, the AL's stated desire to keep one of the Florida markets for itself "never entered the committee's thinking," according to expansion commitee member Bill Giles.What it did come down to is what these big business decisions almost always revolve around -- cold, hard cash.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 4, 2013
Joe Flacco strolled into the cramped media room at the Under Armour Performance Center in Owings Mills looking like he had just signed a scorecard after a round of 18 holes, not the richest contract in league history. In the moment, he forgot to thank his agent, who was standing at his side, for negotiating his six-year extension and thank the Ravens for agreeing to give him $120.6 million. In between the several quality jokes he cracked, Flacco quipped that this was never about the money.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | July 16, 2007
I know how some of you like to whine about the heat and humidity, as if you live in Lake Tahoe or something and this kind of weather comes as a total shock. Stop deluding yourself. This is Baltimore, hon. Hell's Waiting Room in the summertime. You have to suck it up and deal with it. OK, here's what you do to beat the heat: Stay inside, grab the remote and click on Ice Road Truckers, a reality series on The History Channel that follows six lunatics as they drive their big 18-wheelers over "ice roads" carved on frozen lakes, hauling supplies to remote diamond mines near the Arctic Circle in Canada's Northwest Territories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Krishana Davis | November 5, 2012
As we embark on the fifth season with our favorite Atlanta housewives, there's a new mean girl in town. Kenya Moore, the second black woman to join the ranks of beauties as MISS USA, shows her ugly side as a judge for JET magazine Black Beauty of The Week casting. Our ears are still ringing from her sounding off about some of the contestants' "coochie crack," showing in their swimsuits. But more on Kenya later. In other housewives-related news, even if you had been under a rock all summer you still heard that NeNe Leakes has more than self-proclaimed long money -- yes she's "rich b----.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 4, 2013
Joe Flacco strolled into the cramped media room at the Under Armour Performance Center in Owings Mills looking like he had just signed a scorecard after a round of 18 holes, not the richest contract in league history. In the moment, he forgot to thank his agent, who was standing at his side, for negotiating his six-year extension and thank the Ravens for agreeing to give him $120.6 million. In between the several quality jokes he cracked, Flacco quipped that this was never about the money.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 1, 1993
There comes a time in a man's life when he begins to tire of waking up on New Year's Day in somebody's bathtub, clad only in underwear and cowboy boots, a half-smoked Marlboro dangling from his lips and clumps of confetti and Ritz cracker in his hair.Therefore, I spent last night pretty much as I've spent many nights recently, rocking to and fro in one corner of the darkened living room and adjusting the shawl around my shoulders from time to time.Aside from speed-dialing the neighbors every 10 minutes and asking in a withering voice if they could please keep the noise down, as the sound of all that laughter was depressing, there was very little social interaction.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- If money talks, you can't prove it by Frankie Lucas.The manager of a U.S. 50 convenience store, Lucas has been waving cold hard cash -- a $1,000 bonus -- from a banner hanging on the West Ocean City business. She has hired three of the two dozen workers she needs for the summer season."This is the second year we've offered it to anybody who stays through Labor Day," Lucas says. "We started out with $500, and that didn't seem to do it. It's so much worse than last year. You keep thinking it can't get any worse, but I'm working at least 60 hours a week."
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 8, 2010
Employers are offering financial incentives so workers will do the right things, and veteran mothers, who have been paying for everything from good grades to made beds for years, are, like, "Duh!" One program pays employees $10 to $100 a day to take their blood pressure medicine because the health care costs of not doing so can be so high. Another gives workers time to go to exercise classes and then cuts their share of health care premiums if they show up regularly. Another pays people to stop smoking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Krishana Davis | November 5, 2012
As we embark on the fifth season with our favorite Atlanta housewives, there's a new mean girl in town. Kenya Moore, the second black woman to join the ranks of beauties as MISS USA, shows her ugly side as a judge for JET magazine Black Beauty of The Week casting. Our ears are still ringing from her sounding off about some of the contestants' "coochie crack," showing in their swimsuits. But more on Kenya later. In other housewives-related news, even if you had been under a rock all summer you still heard that NeNe Leakes has more than self-proclaimed long money -- yes she's "rich b----.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | November 1, 1991
Charles Allmon isn't shy -- shareholders of his Growth Stock Outlook Trust were asked recently to rename it after him -- but he is plenty cautious when it comes to investing the trust's money in stocks.Since the trust went into business a bit more than five years ago, Allmon, long a successful financial adviser, has been reluctant to commit much of the trust's money to stocks. His bearishness on the stock market in general means that the Bethesda-based trust is largely in cash.Allmon Trust is a closed-end investment company, unlike a mutual fund in that a closed-ender has a set number of shares that trade back and forth, whereas a mutual can issue any number of new shares as new money comes in, or reduce shares as holders sell.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 8, 2010
Employers are offering financial incentives so workers will do the right things, and veteran mothers, who have been paying for everything from good grades to made beds for years, are, like, "Duh!" One program pays employees $10 to $100 a day to take their blood pressure medicine because the health care costs of not doing so can be so high. Another gives workers time to go to exercise classes and then cuts their share of health care premiums if they show up regularly. Another pays people to stop smoking.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | July 16, 2007
I know how some of you like to whine about the heat and humidity, as if you live in Lake Tahoe or something and this kind of weather comes as a total shock. Stop deluding yourself. This is Baltimore, hon. Hell's Waiting Room in the summertime. You have to suck it up and deal with it. OK, here's what you do to beat the heat: Stay inside, grab the remote and click on Ice Road Truckers, a reality series on The History Channel that follows six lunatics as they drive their big 18-wheelers over "ice roads" carved on frozen lakes, hauling supplies to remote diamond mines near the Arctic Circle in Canada's Northwest Territories.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- If money talks, you can't prove it by Frankie Lucas.The manager of a U.S. 50 convenience store, Lucas has been waving cold hard cash -- a $1,000 bonus -- from a banner hanging on the West Ocean City business. She has hired three of the two dozen workers she needs for the summer season."This is the second year we've offered it to anybody who stays through Labor Day," Lucas says. "We started out with $500, and that didn't seem to do it. It's so much worse than last year. You keep thinking it can't get any worse, but I'm working at least 60 hours a week."
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 18, 1999
After a recent screening of "Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace," a 14-year-old was overheard to say, "The blue-screen was amazing. I wonder how much it will make?"The "blue screen" refers to how special effects are done these days: Live-action actors do their thing against a blue screen, which is later replaced with digital backgrounds and effects. When the first "Star Wars" became a sleeper hit over the summer, 22 years ago, few if any 14-year-olds would have known what a blue screen was.The wonks have won. Those niggling concerns of movies past -- things like story, character and meaning -- have finally been vanquished by Lucas' megalo-merchandising machine.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
Jeff Harding, a local pro bowler who began competing on the national tournament regularly this spring, had a good week at the $140,000 Wichita Open this week at North Rock Lanes in Wichita, Kan..Harding, a left-hander who has regularly bowled at Country Club Lanes despite living in Frederick County, bowled well enough to make the top 24. And going into Friday's competition, he was in fifth place.After the fifth and sixth rounds Friday, however, Harding had dropped to 19th place. Over 42 games he averaged 213, knocking down 8,984 pins.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 1, 1993
There comes a time in a man's life when he begins to tire of waking up on New Year's Day in somebody's bathtub, clad only in underwear and cowboy boots, a half-smoked Marlboro dangling from his lips and clumps of confetti and Ritz cracker in his hair.Therefore, I spent last night pretty much as I've spent many nights recently, rocking to and fro in one corner of the darkened living room and adjusting the shawl around my shoulders from time to time.Aside from speed-dialing the neighbors every 10 minutes and asking in a withering voice if they could please keep the noise down, as the sound of all that laughter was depressing, there was very little social interaction.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
Jeff Harding, a local pro bowler who began competing on the national tournament regularly this spring, had a good week at the $140,000 Wichita Open this week at North Rock Lanes in Wichita, Kan..Harding, a left-hander who has regularly bowled at Country Club Lanes despite living in Frederick County, bowled well enough to make the top 24. And going into Friday's competition, he was in fifth place.After the fifth and sixth rounds Friday, however, Harding had dropped to 19th place. Over 42 games he averaged 213, knocking down 8,984 pins.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillon | August 23, 1992
Allan Palmer and his wife, Patti, are very busy when the weekends roll around. Allan drag races every weekend, and Patti spends her weekends bowling.Patti would like to be with her husband, but she is a professional duckpin bowler. Her competitions, like his, are on weekends."Our hobbies conflict," said Allan. "We try to go with each other as often as we can. But we can't always do that."The nice thing about their hobbies is that they are both making money doing what they enjoy. Last weekend, Patti competed in a tournament at Southside Fair Lanes in Baltimore while Allan was at 75-80 Dragway in Monrovia.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillon | August 23, 1992
Allan Palmer and his wife, Patti, are very busy when the weekends roll around. Allan drag races every weekend, and Patti spends her weekends bowling.Patti would like to be with her husband, but she is a professional duckpin bowler. Her competitions, like his, are on weekends."Our hobbies conflict," said Allan. "We try to go with each other as often as we can. But we can't always do that."The nice thing about their hobbies is that they are both making money doing what they enjoy. Last weekend, Patti competed in a tournament at Southside Fair Lanes in Baltimore while Allan was at 75-80 Dragway in Monrovia.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | November 1, 1991
Charles Allmon isn't shy -- shareholders of his Growth Stock Outlook Trust were asked recently to rename it after him -- but he is plenty cautious when it comes to investing the trust's money in stocks.Since the trust went into business a bit more than five years ago, Allmon, long a successful financial adviser, has been reluctant to commit much of the trust's money to stocks. His bearishness on the stock market in general means that the Bethesda-based trust is largely in cash.Allmon Trust is a closed-end investment company, unlike a mutual fund in that a closed-ender has a set number of shares that trade back and forth, whereas a mutual can issue any number of new shares as new money comes in, or reduce shares as holders sell.
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