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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
A $5 million lawsuit brought by a Baltimore penthouse condo owner over mold in his unit was recently dismissed by a Baltimore Circuit Court judge in favor of the waterfront property's condo association. The condo owner, Paul G. Clark, bought a penthouse unit at auction at the HarborView off Key Highway for $1.15 million in 2009. He later sued the condo association and property manager, Zalco Realty Inc., at the 27-story building over a water leak that he claimed damaged his unit and caused mold.
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FEATURES
By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Peter Bowe and his wife, Barbara Stewart, chose their waterfront townhome for its location. An end unit at the tip of a pier in the HarborView complex, the home soars next to Baltimore's harbor, affording spectacular views, a stellar seat for Pier Six concerts and a quick, five-minute commute to Bowe's job as president of Ellicott Dredges in South Baltimore. “I describe it by saying you can fish out of every room in the house except the kitchen,” quips Bowe. “You look out the window every day, and you're connected to the city and the water,” Stewart continues, “but it's remarkably quiet.” Bowe, 58, and Stewart, 51, a retired executive at JP Morgan, share a life goal of spending more time with friends and family, and this house, which they purchased a year ago, is an idyllic spot.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ruled that the Harborview condo association must pay the owner of one of the tower's penthouses more than $15,500 each month for failing to complete maintenance within a court-ordered deadline. Judge Emanuel Brown found the condo association in contempt of a 2011 award, upheld on appeal in 2013, that required the board to complete maintenance due to water infiltration in owner James W. Ancel, Sr.'s 27 t h floor unit. Ancel, the head of a Towson-based construction firm, filed suit against the board in 2010 over mold problems in the luxury waterfront tower.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ruled that the Harborview condo association must pay the owner of one of the tower's penthouses more than $15,500 each month for failing to complete maintenance within a court-ordered deadline. Judge Emanuel Brown found the condo association in contempt of a 2011 award, upheld on appeal in 2013, that required the board to complete maintenance due to water infiltration in owner James W. Ancel, Sr.'s 27 t h floor unit. Ancel, the head of a Towson-based construction firm, filed suit against the board in 2010 over mold problems in the luxury waterfront tower.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
Bending to a weak real estate market but determined to push ahead with a proposed $600 million waterfront village on Key Highway, developers of HarborView will rent luxury apartments rather than sell condominiums in the high-rise tower they plan to start in a year.Proceeding with a rental tower -- which developers always have planned to include somewhere among six proposed towers on the 42 acres -- in no way means developers have veered from their original vision of an upscale, resort-style community, said HarborView officials.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Many Marylanders live on the water, but the owner of this contemporary townhouse in Baltimore can walk out on three balconies and be over the water. The five-level home, built in 2006, sold for $1,125,000, about $100,000 less than the asking price. "This home was fun to sell because it showed so well and had excellent views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor from every level," said real estate agent William J. Ganz III, who listed the townhouse at 647 Ponte Villas South. "Combined with the fact that it is located in the private, gated Pier Homes at Harborview community, it was just a matter of time before it sold.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
Buyers snapped up townhouses alongside the Inner Harbor for as much as $1 million off the asking price at a Monday night auction that experts say could help reset prices in Baltimore's languishing luxury real estate market. The auction — held at a Baltimore Marriott Waterfront hotel ballroom where bidders were greeted with an ice sculpture and served dishes such as pork tenderloin — drew about 400 people, 135 of whom registered to bid. After the action started, the development partners put more units on the block than originally planned and sold 18, all for hundreds of thousands of dollars off. The most expensive of the Pier Homes at HarborView auctioned off was a 3,732-square-foot unit.
NEWS
September 15, 1993
In some ways, Baltimore's 27-story HarborView condominium complex seems as odd as its roof-top beacon that lights the night sky around the Inner Harbor. Here is one of the biggest private residential developments ever built in the city being completed at a time of continuing real estate foreclosures and economic uncertainty.Is it a harbinger of a boom or bust?With apartment prices ranging from $161,000 to $1.7 million, HarborView does not promise cheap living in a rowhouse city where a number of condominiums have run into trouble.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | September 16, 1990
The fall of 1990 hardly seems an ideal time to start selling luxury high-rise condominiums on Baltimore's waterfront. With the crisis in the Middle East, the sluggish economy back home and past resistance to high-rise housing locally, it may seem more like sheer madness.But if anyone is going to roll the dice and come up a winner, the developers of the HarborView condominiums in South Baltimore appear to have a shot.With today's grand opening of a $5 million sales center and yacht club at 500 HarborView Drive, the public is going to see a high-powered, high-tech marketing effort that surpasses the debuts of just about any other local project in recent years -- for sheer chutzpah if nothing else.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1991
The developer of Baltimore's HarborView Marina and Yacht )) Club was selected as a Silver finalist for marketing efforts in the 1992 "MIRM" awards, the nation's largest new home marketing competition.HarborView Development Co., a joint venture of the Swirnow Group and Parkway Holdings Ltd., was named as having the "Best Sales and Information Pavilion" -- the three-story sales center and yacht club off the 1100 block of Key Highway.The pavilion was designed by the Columbia Design Collective to serve as the sales center for the entire $600 million, 42-acre HarborView community, which will have up to 1,590 residences.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
HarborView Towers, a condominium complex on the Inner Harbor, aims to become an iconic part of the Baltimore skyline now that it has revamped the beacon atop its east tower. "[It's] new and exciting, and I think people are just going to love it," said John Cochran, president of the council of unit owners at HarborView Towers. The new beacon on the building off Key Highway uses energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, which are not only environmentally friendly and cost-efficient, but offer the opportunity for ever-changing displays.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Your headline writers and editors need to learn where the Inner Harbor is and consider the negative, false impression they are giving the world about Baltimore's "crown jewel" ("Body found in Inner Harbor is ninth in recent months," Feb. 28). Though the headline said nine dead bodies have been found in the Inner Harbor in recent months, only one was actually in the Inner Harbor, and that one is considered a suicide by police. The map showing the nine locations was labeled "Bodies found in the Inner Harbor," although eight of them were outside of it: two at Harbor East, two at Fells Point, two at Port Covington and one each at Canton, the Canton Industrial Area and Harborview.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Many Marylanders live on the water, but the owner of this contemporary townhouse in Baltimore can walk out on three balconies and be over the water. The five-level home, built in 2006, sold for $1,125,000, about $100,000 less than the asking price. "This home was fun to sell because it showed so well and had excellent views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor from every level," said real estate agent William J. Ganz III, who listed the townhouse at 647 Ponte Villas South. "Combined with the fact that it is located in the private, gated Pier Homes at Harborview community, it was just a matter of time before it sold.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2012
If a little green might help restore Baltimore's ailing harbor, how can a lot be bad? That's the question city, state and federal officials are pondering as they weigh a local marina magnate's plan to fill an unused corner of the Inner Harbor with a large floating marsh. Inspired by a pair of pint-sized experimental wetlands placed in the harbor two years ago, Dan Naor has proposed building a much larger one, covering 1.6 acres of open water in the Harborview marina off Key Highway.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
At issue: City Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector routinely bills the city for driving to her Northwest Baltimore district - trips she says often begin at the Inner Harbor condominium where she lives with her boyfriend. The cost: Spector, who has served on the council since 1977, filed for more than $3,000 in mileage for travel within the city during a 13-month period, according to her expense reports, an average of more than 400 miles a month. Only one other city legislator, Councilwoman Helen Holton, bills the city for travel within Baltimore; she submitted less than $200 in travel charges within city limits for the same period.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
A $5 million lawsuit brought by a Baltimore penthouse condo owner over mold in his unit was recently dismissed by a Baltimore Circuit Court judge in favor of the waterfront property's condo association. The condo owner, Paul G. Clark, bought a penthouse unit at auction at the HarborView off Key Highway for $1.15 million in 2009. He later sued the condo association and property manager, Zalco Realty Inc., at the 27-story building over a water leak that he claimed damaged his unit and caused mold.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
Dato Tan Chin Nam, the Malaysia-based chairman of Far Eastern investors bankrolling Baltimore's HarborView, is the first one to admit that the $100 million condominium complex near Federal Hill has done poorly in its initial year."
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
One month after opening an $80 million, 248-unit condominium tower in South Baltimore, developers of the HarborView community are seeking approval to build an $8 million comprehensive-care nursing home nearby.Sites proposed for the nursing home -- either 1100-1126, 1128 or 1200 Key Highway -- are controlled by HarborView Properties Development Co., headed by Richard Swirnow. They are across Key Highway from the 42-acre waterfront HarborView parcel, which has been approved for up to 1,590 condominiums.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
The Tiki Barge won't have a twin barge this Spring after all. Owners of the popular and controversial floating barge had planned to build a seafood and raw bar aboard a second barge this Spring, but the Baltimore Liquor Board Thursday sided with neighbors who opposed the idea. The decision was a major disappointment for Tiki manager Bud Craven, who was ready to start construction Monday.  "I'm real surprised," Craven said after the hearing. "A lot of time and a lot of money has already been spent on this project.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Chip Olsen and his wife, Linda, grew up on Long Island. Their memories, reflected in framed photographs on the walls of their home, are of long afternoons sitting on sandy beaches or idly dangling their feet from one of the many piers along the shore. Little wonder, then, that they would end up living in a home on a pier jutting 500 feet into Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Chip Olsen's job as senior managing director at CB Richard Ellis required travel and relocation, taking the couple from Charlotte to Atlanta.
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