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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
From its waterfront perch at the corner of Thames Street and Broadway, Barcocina might occupy the most enviable real estate in all of Baltimore. With views of the harbor on one side and historic Fells Point on the other, the restaurant provides a glimpse of Baltimore at its most attractive. With those vistas and that central location, Barcocina's owners would have been forgiven for playing it safe in the kitchen, sticking with crab cakes and bar food. Instead, the restaurant has adopted a modern approach to Mexican food, serving creative twists on familiar dishes like tacos and seviche.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
From its waterfront perch at the corner of Thames Street and Broadway, Barcocina might occupy the most enviable real estate in all of Baltimore. With views of the harbor on one side and historic Fells Point on the other, the restaurant provides a glimpse of Baltimore at its most attractive. With those vistas and that central location, Barcocina's owners would have been forgiven for playing it safe in the kitchen, sticking with crab cakes and bar food. Instead, the restaurant has adopted a modern approach to Mexican food, serving creative twists on familiar dishes like tacos and seviche.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | December 9, 2004
Hometown: Baltimore Current members: Mario Clementoni, vocals, guitar; Lynn Roxy Green, sax, flute, keyboards, vocals. Founded in: 1994 Style: Smooth jazz Influenced by: Scott Hamilton and Diana Krall. Notable: Roxy & Company's new record, titled My Heart Will Catch Up With the News, comes out on Saturday. Green collaborated with blues artist Deanna Bogart on the title song -- which refers to "that time when your head knows a relationship is bound for failure but your heart doesn't want to believe it yet," said Green.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
A $5 million lawsuit brought by a Baltimore penthouse condo owner over mold in his unit was recently dismissed by a Baltimore Circuit Court judge in favor of the waterfront property's condo association. The condo owner, Paul G. Clark, bought a penthouse unit at auction at the HarborView off Key Highway for $1.15 million in 2009. He later sued the condo association and property manager, Zalco Realty Inc., at the 27-story building over a water leak that he claimed damaged his unit and caused mold.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
Back when Baltimore had a working waterfront, full of rotting piers and rusty barges, hardly anyone sat around admiring the harbor view. Now that's all the newcomers want to do - from atop roof decks cobbled in Canton, Federal Hill and elsewhere at a rate approaching one a day. Two and three stories above street level, there's a building boom in Baltimore, one that has come at great expense to homeowners, required both the newest and crudest construction techniques,...
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
Baltimore added a third line to its free Charm City Circulator service Tuesday, with the launch of the new Green Route at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Green line will run from Hopkins Hospital through Fells Point and Harbor East before heading north to City Hall and the Fallsway. It will then head back to Hopkins along the same route. The Green joins the east-west Orange Route, launched in January 2010 as one of the last acts of Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration, and the north-south Purple Route, which got its start later that year.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
THE VIEW of Baltimore's waterfront should belong to no one and everyone. A stroll around Federal Hill Park affords those with energy and a pair of comfortable shoes a million-dollar view of the city skyline at an unbeatable price - free. That kind of access should be the standard. When city planning officials offer a harbor view through a series of tall, slender waterfront buildings, it sounds like taking in the sights through a pair of vertical blinds. A prime city-owned parcel along Key Highway is under consideration to be redeveloped.
NEWS
September 15, 1993
In some ways, Baltimore's 27-story HarborView condominium complex seems as odd as its roof-top beacon that lights the night sky around the Inner Harbor. Here is one of the biggest private residential developments ever built in the city being completed at a time of continuing real estate foreclosures and economic uncertainty.Is it a harbinger of a boom or bust?With apartment prices ranging from $161,000 to $1.7 million, HarborView does not promise cheap living in a rowhouse city where a number of condominiums have run into trouble.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
One of the largest collections of property on Baltimore's Inner Harbor — the last four undeveloped parcels of the HarborView community — was put up for sale Monday. CB Richard Ellis, or CBRE, a commercial real estate services firm, announced Monday that it has set Feb. 1 as the deadline for prospective buyers to express interest in acquiring or investing in one or more of the parcels at HarborView, the upscale community along Key Highway that Baltimore businessman Richard Swirnow and others have built over the past two decades.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
Buyers snapped up townhouses alongside the Inner Harbor for as much as $1 million off the asking price at a Monday night auction that experts say could help reset prices in Baltimore's languishing luxury real estate market. The auction — held at a Baltimore Marriott Waterfront hotel ballroom where bidders were greeted with an ice sculpture and served dishes such as pork tenderloin — drew about 400 people, 135 of whom registered to bid. After the action started, the development partners put more units on the block than originally planned and sold 18, all for hundreds of thousands of dollars off. The most expensive of the Pier Homes at HarborView auctioned off was a 3,732-square-foot unit.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
Baltimore added a third line to its free Charm City Circulator service Tuesday, with the launch of the new Green Route at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Green line will run from Hopkins Hospital through Fells Point and Harbor East before heading north to City Hall and the Fallsway. It will then head back to Hopkins along the same route. The Green joins the east-west Orange Route, launched in January 2010 as one of the last acts of Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration, and the north-south Purple Route, which got its start later that year.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
One of the largest collections of property on Baltimore's Inner Harbor — the last four undeveloped parcels of the HarborView community — was put up for sale Monday. CB Richard Ellis, or CBRE, a commercial real estate services firm, announced Monday that it has set Feb. 1 as the deadline for prospective buyers to express interest in acquiring or investing in one or more of the parcels at HarborView, the upscale community along Key Highway that Baltimore businessman Richard Swirnow and others have built over the past two decades.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
Buyers snapped up townhouses alongside the Inner Harbor for as much as $1 million off the asking price at a Monday night auction that experts say could help reset prices in Baltimore's languishing luxury real estate market. The auction — held at a Baltimore Marriott Waterfront hotel ballroom where bidders were greeted with an ice sculpture and served dishes such as pork tenderloin — drew about 400 people, 135 of whom registered to bid. After the action started, the development partners put more units on the block than originally planned and sold 18, all for hundreds of thousands of dollars off. The most expensive of the Pier Homes at HarborView auctioned off was a 3,732-square-foot unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa and sam sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | July 2, 2009
The biggest nightlife event this weekend isn't a crazy dance party or a concert by a hot new band - it's the Fourth of July fireworks display downtown. Since the annual holiday falls on a Saturday, bars, restaurants and clubs are going to be busy all day and night. And no part of town will be more flooded with revelers than the Inner Harbor. Restaurants there will fill up fast, traffic will be tied in a knot, and it could take as long as half an hour to hoof it across Harborplace. Though the Light and Pratt street pavilions offer front-row seats for the annual fireworks at 9:30 p.m., they're not the only harborside spots with great views.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
A prominent Key Highway development could expand after years of delay - and despite community concerns - under a zoning proposal advanced by a City Council committee last night. The legislation would allow HarborView's developer, Richard A. Swirnow, to build a 26-story tower, and also to proceed on an adjacent 17-story building west of the high-rise on the site. At a lengthy hearing before the Urban Affairs and Aging Committee yesterday, proponents argued that design on the towers was the best HarborView had put forward for the project because it preserved greater views and access to the water.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | June 4, 2008
After years of delay, Baltimore is moving to allow a prominent developer to build two residential towers along Key Highway - renewing community concerns about the future of the peninsula's vanishing waterfront. If the City Council approves the zoning change, HarborView developer Richard A. Swirnow would be permitted to build a 26-story tower and could also proceed on an adjacent 17-story building west of the high-rise already on the site. City officials say the proposed design is the best they have seen because it maintains better views of the water for surrounding residents and includes first-floor shopping to enliven Key Highway.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1991
The developer of Baltimore's HarborView Marina and Yacht )) Club was selected as a Silver finalist for marketing efforts in the 1992 "MIRM" awards, the nation's largest new home marketing competition.HarborView Development Co., a joint venture of the Swirnow Group and Parkway Holdings Ltd., was named as having the "Best Sales and Information Pavilion" -- the three-story sales center and yacht club off the 1100 block of Key Highway.The pavilion was designed by the Columbia Design Collective to serve as the sales center for the entire $600 million, 42-acre HarborView community, which will have up to 1,590 residences.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
Dato Tan Chin Nam, the Malaysia-based chairman of Far Eastern investors bankrolling Baltimore's HarborView, is the first one to admit that the $100 million condominium complex near Federal Hill has done poorly in its initial year."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
To the relief of many in South Baltimore, Mayor Sheila Dixon has blocked a plan to build two more waterfront towers at HarborView. Faced with intense community opposition, the mayor pushed HarborView's developer, Richard A. Swirnow, to rescind his request to the City Council that would have enabled him to keep building even though he technically had exhausted his construction options. "I have decided to withdraw [the bill] and instruct the Planning Department and Mayor's Office of Neighborhoods to bring all parties together to find common ground," Dixon wrote in a letter to a community leader who opposes the proposal.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2007
A plan by HarborView to build two more waterfront towers - despite having exhausted its construction options on the South Baltimore site - has aggravated long-standing tensions between the prolific developer and Federal Hill area neighborhoods. People who live south of HarborView, with its hundreds of luxury homes that multiplied at the water's edge in the past two decades, are urging city leaders not to indulge a developer who they say has blocked views, hung no-trespassing signs, violated height limits and defied stop-work orders.
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