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By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Baltimore's familiar Harbor Shuttle, scuttled for a week, resurfaced yesterday in the Inner Harbor.With little fanfare, the city has negotiated a new agreement with Ron Morgan, operator of the water taxi service. The deal puts Harbor Shuttle back in business, a week after Morgan accused city officials of giving his only competitor favored treatment and filed a $2 million lawsuit against the city.According to Morgan, the new agreement will allow Harbor Shuttle to land at the Maryland Science Center and the Harborplace Amphitheatre, between the Pratt and Light streets pavilions.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | June 27, 2009
When a squall flipped the Lady D water taxi in 2004, killing five people and injuring many more, the pontoon boat had 25 people aboard - 10 more than there should have been - because of a Coast Guard mistake. The agency overestimated the capacity the boat could safely carry. But it can't be held responsible. A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that the Coast Guard cannot be sued in the Inner Harbor tragedy because the inspection process it used fell under certain discretionary duties that are immune from legal blame.
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NEWS
February 21, 1998
THANKS TO competition, service by Inner Harbor shuttle boat companies keeps improving. Ridership is up. Unusuallytemperate weather has created demand for year-round operation.An unprecedented 400,000 passengers were ferried within the last 12 months by Ed Kane's Water Taxi. Add to that well over 100,000 visitors transported by Ron Morgan's Harbor Shuttle and it's clear these criss-crossing boats are thriving as never before.With the two companies' contracts expiring in March 1999 -- along with a third operator's exclusive agreement to service Fort McHenry -- the city is in a position to further upgrade the water shuttles.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2000
How's this for a morning commute? Instead of sweating in Beltway traffic, you cruise across the water on a 57-foot-long floating cafe, sipping coffee under a red and white canvas awning as the sun rises over Baltimore's Inner Harbor. A nonprofit organization will launch a commuter boat shuttle service Tuesday to ferry workers who live along Baltimore's waterfront to appointments and meetings in the growing number of high-technology companies sprouting in former industrial buildings. The first Seaport Taxi pushed off yesterday from the Tide Point office complex in Locust Point, carrying reporters on a tour of office development sites.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
One of Baltimore's familiar water taxis went out of business yesterday.The city is prohibiting Silver Clipper Inc., which operates as Harbor Shuttle, from landing at the Harborplace Amphitheatre, between the Pratt and Light streets pavilions. The amphitheater was the company's only Inner Harbor stop."It's devastating," said Ron Morgan, Silver Clipper president. "At this point, I don't know what's going to happen. We're officially out of business."George G. Balog, director of the Department of Public Works, issued the directive Monday -- five days after Morgan filed a $2 million suit against the city for halting his use of six other landings.
NEWS
March 1, 1997
AS BALTIMORE'S public works director, George S. Balog is a powerful man. He commands a big budget and an army of workers, who can favor friends or punish enemies. This fact is well understood: Mr. Balog derives much of his considerable power from being one of the most productive fund raisers for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's political causes.Mr. Balog has now made a peculiar contribution to the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Baltimore's incorporation. At the start of the tourist season, he has banished one of the two rival water taxi companies from using city landings at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1996
There is a brave new band of commuters in Baltimore who literally float to work each day.They might be called the harbor water brigade.This handful of downtown lawyers, accountants, advertising executives and brokers commute across the harbor's waters on a daily voyage they describe as "relaxing," "invigorating" and "free of traffic hassles." They also say they save a lot of money in downtown parking fees.They travel on the Harbor Shuttle, a pontoon boat that picks them up each morning at Canton (off Tindeco Wharf along Boston Street)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 22, 1992
You don't have to be a New Jersey tourist to enjoy Baltimore's harbor ballet.Three competing water shuttles skim from the Light Street Promenade all over the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River. For less than the cost of a designer ice cream confection, you can dart all day to and from the waterside neighborhoods of Fells Point or Canton. You'd never get there so fast in a car and voyagers see Baltimore as it looks best -- from the water.Some fans are even taking one of the lines from Canton to the Oriole games.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | August 30, 1997
THIS HAS BEEN one great summer for merchants and restaurateurs who depend on Inner Harbor tourism. There hasn't been one rained-out weekend since Memorial Day. Can't beat that!Baltimore's water-shuttle companies have ferried record numbers of people between harbor attractions ranging from Canton's Waterfront Park in the east to the Museum of Industry in the south. ''It's not a boat ride, it's a transportation system,'' says Ed Kane of Water Taxi.The shuttles, which have carried an estimated 500,000 so far this year, have enabled growing numbers of tourists to discover Fells Point.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
Baltimore's familiar water taxis are facing turbulent tides in their bid to do business in the Inner Harbor.The city has told operators of the Water Taxi and Harbor Shuttle that the proposals they submitted to city officials this summer -- in hopes of securing a new contract that would allow them to stay afloat into the next century -- are insufficient.The companies were the only businesses to compete for the contract, which would have granted one or more water taxi services the right to land at city-owned docks in the Inner Harbor for an unspecified period beginning April 1, 1999.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
The operators of an Inner Harbor water taxi filed a $9 million suit in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday against a rival service, alleging the rival made false claims to win city approval and that its boats make the Inner Harbor unsafe for water taxis.Harbor Boating Inc., which operates Water Taxi, filed the suit against Silver Clipper Inc. and its two principals, Ronald B. Morgan and Gail B. Flanagan.The suit alleges Morgan and Flanagan misrepresented Silver Clipper as "100 percent woman owned" last year when they won city approval to continue shuttling Inner Harbor passengers.
NEWS
February 21, 1998
THANKS TO competition, service by Inner Harbor shuttle boat companies keeps improving. Ridership is up. Unusuallytemperate weather has created demand for year-round operation.An unprecedented 400,000 passengers were ferried within the last 12 months by Ed Kane's Water Taxi. Add to that well over 100,000 visitors transported by Ron Morgan's Harbor Shuttle and it's clear these criss-crossing boats are thriving as never before.With the two companies' contracts expiring in March 1999 -- along with a third operator's exclusive agreement to service Fort McHenry -- the city is in a position to further upgrade the water shuttles.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
Baltimore's two competing water taxis will stay afloat into the next century, if city officials can persuade the operators to share several landings in the Inner Harbor.That proposal doesn't please Ed Kane, owner of Water Taxi, who is refusing to dock at any landing that his competitor is allowed to use."The city's recommendation raises very severe safety concerns," said James P. Gillece Jr., the lawyer representing Kane. "The idea of having two boats going to one landing, which they are to share, to try to pick up passengers -- it would be a prelude to disaster."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
Baltimore's familiar water taxis are facing turbulent tides in their bid to do business in the Inner Harbor.The city has told operators of the Water Taxi and Harbor Shuttle that the proposals they submitted to city officials this summer -- in hopes of securing a new contract that would allow them to stay afloat into the next century -- are insufficient.The companies were the only businesses to compete for the contract, which would have granted one or more water taxi services the right to land at city-owned docks in the Inner Harbor for an unspecified period beginning April 1, 1999.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | August 30, 1997
THIS HAS BEEN one great summer for merchants and restaurateurs who depend on Inner Harbor tourism. There hasn't been one rained-out weekend since Memorial Day. Can't beat that!Baltimore's water-shuttle companies have ferried record numbers of people between harbor attractions ranging from Canton's Waterfront Park in the east to the Museum of Industry in the south. ''It's not a boat ride, it's a transportation system,'' says Ed Kane of Water Taxi.The shuttles, which have carried an estimated 500,000 so far this year, have enabled growing numbers of tourists to discover Fells Point.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Baltimore's familiar Harbor Shuttle, scuttled for a week, resurfaced yesterday in the Inner Harbor.With little fanfare, the city has negotiated a new agreement with Ron Morgan, operator of the water taxi service. The deal puts Harbor Shuttle back in business, a week after Morgan accused city officials of giving his only competitor favored treatment and filed a $2 million lawsuit against the city.According to Morgan, the new agreement will allow Harbor Shuttle to land at the Maryland Science Center and the Harborplace Amphitheatre, between the Pratt and Light streets pavilions.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
The operators of an Inner Harbor water taxi filed a $9 million suit in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday against a rival service, alleging the rival made false claims to win city approval and that its boats make the Inner Harbor unsafe for water taxis.Harbor Boating Inc., which operates Water Taxi, filed the suit against Silver Clipper Inc. and its two principals, Ronald B. Morgan and Gail B. Flanagan.The suit alleges Morgan and Flanagan misrepresented Silver Clipper as "100 percent woman owned" last year when they won city approval to continue shuttling Inner Harbor passengers.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
Baltimore's two competing water taxis will stay afloat into the next century, if city officials can persuade the operators to share several landings in the Inner Harbor.That proposal doesn't please Ed Kane, owner of Water Taxi, who is refusing to dock at any landing that his competitor is allowed to use."The city's recommendation raises very severe safety concerns," said James P. Gillece Jr., the lawyer representing Kane. "The idea of having two boats going to one landing, which they are to share, to try to pick up passengers -- it would be a prelude to disaster."
NEWS
March 1, 1997
AS BALTIMORE'S public works director, George S. Balog is a powerful man. He commands a big budget and an army of workers, who can favor friends or punish enemies. This fact is well understood: Mr. Balog derives much of his considerable power from being one of the most productive fund raisers for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's political causes.Mr. Balog has now made a peculiar contribution to the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Baltimore's incorporation. At the start of the tourist season, he has banished one of the two rival water taxi companies from using city landings at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
One of Baltimore's familiar water taxis went out of business yesterday.The city is prohibiting Silver Clipper Inc., which operates as Harbor Shuttle, from landing at the Harborplace Amphitheatre, between the Pratt and Light streets pavilions. The amphitheater was the company's only Inner Harbor stop."It's devastating," said Ron Morgan, Silver Clipper president. "At this point, I don't know what's going to happen. We're officially out of business."George G. Balog, director of the Department of Public Works, issued the directive Monday -- five days after Morgan filed a $2 million suit against the city for halting his use of six other landings.
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