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Harbor Court Hotel

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 25, 2005
When Bethesda-based photographer Amy Lamb began exhibiting her elegant, meticulously crafted images of flowers more than a decade ago, the digital technology that made the pictures possible was just emerging as a vital new creative tool. Lamb, a former National Institutes of Health scientist whose specialty was molecular biology, took up the camera seriously after taking a beginning photography course at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, where one of her assignments was to photograph an orchid show in the museum's botanical gardens.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Bulky televisions - gone. Floral bedspreads - out of the picture. Desks where you plug in your laptop - so yesterday. Touches once found in the best hotels are going by the wayside in downtown Baltimore. The biggest hotels are spending millions of dollars to update and upgrade, to cater to tech-savvy guests and compete in a radically shifting hotel landscape. Hotels are going wireless in the guestrooms, smoothing "popcorn" ceilings, installing flat-screen computer monitors to double as TVs and making bedding more luxurious and lobbies more inviting.
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NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF Reporter Peter Jensen contributed to this article | May 3, 1997
Maybe it's that Baltimore's proximity to Washington makes a president's trip here seem more like a commuter's shuttle than a state visit. Or that Bill Clinton has been here so many times before.Whatever it was, a visit to the Inner Harbor yesterday by President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore barely raised TC eyebrows. Except for those irked by the long line of shiny limos and police escorts that held up waterfront traffic, Baltimore seemed unable to muster much excitement.The nation's chief executive wasn't here long.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 25, 2005
When Bethesda-based photographer Amy Lamb began exhibiting her elegant, meticulously crafted images of flowers more than a decade ago, the digital technology that made the pictures possible was just emerging as a vital new creative tool. Lamb, a former National Institutes of Health scientist whose specialty was molecular biology, took up the camera seriously after taking a beginning photography course at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, where one of her assignments was to photograph an orchid show in the museum's botanical gardens.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1996
The sign on the Harbor Court Hotel in Baltimore is discreet, shedding no light upon who might be residing behind those ponderous-looking walls. But behind all that rust-colored brick is the city's most select hotel, a quiet and private sanctuary for the very successful.A peek inside the English draperies last week would have revealed Cal Ripken Jr. playing host at a luncheon. Or, several years ago, Frank Sinatra posing for photos with startled hotel guests in the safari-inspired Explorer's Lounge.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
It wasn't the custom-made Irish linen. Ditto for the Italian marble or the handmade rugs, the silk wall coverings, the frescoes on the ceiling, or even those 5-inch color TV sets mounted in the guest bathrooms.Oh, those things are nice. But to the discriminating traveler, they're practically a given. What makes Baltimore's tony Harbor Court Hotel truly special -- at least in the eyes of the American Academy of Hospitality Services -- is the service. Period."You can look at marble and crystal all day," says Joseph Cinque, the academy's director of operations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | December 9, 1999
York, Pa., artist Adrienne Stein is only 13 years old but has demonstrated an extraordinary, largely untutored natural facility for drawing and painting that her family has nurtured despite their relative isolation from mainstream art institutions.A selection of Stein's recent watercolors and oils, painted from life or from photographic reproductions in a naive, Impressionist-derived style, is on view at the Harbor Court Hotel Gallery in Baltimore through Jan. 31.The Harbor Court Hotel is at 550 Light St. The gallery is on the hotel's second floor and is open to the public free of charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 4, 2000
Judy Kistner called Linwood Restaurant's feta-cheese-and-crab-meat salad "incredible." Tom Brady found Suburban Club's shrimp scampi "nice and spicy." And Dr. Joel Sereboff deemed Chef's Expressions' sea bass "outasight." Everyone had favorites at Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland's eighth annual Culinary Extravaganza. Fifteen local chefs lined the walls of Harbor Court Hotel's ballroom, wooden spoons and saute pans in hand -- offering a treasure trove of gourmet dishes to 300 hungry guests.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1997
New positionsDevine to head human resources at Harbor Court HotelHarbor Court Hotel announced the selection of Eva M. Devine as director of human resources. She will have responsibility for implementing regulatory and corporate personnel policy and will also sit on the hotel's executive committee. Before joining the luxury hotel, the Sweet Briar College graduate was operations director for the Pride of Baltimore and the former marketing director for Baltimore-based Faidley's Seafood. Berkshire Consulting Group, in Ellicott City, announced Donna T. Rawlings has joined the firm as a senior consulting associate.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
Timothy Warren Green, who owned an Inner Harbor floral business and formerly taught eighth-graders bound for Baltimore's School for the Arts, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his Pikesville home. He was 45. The owner of the J.J. Cummings Floral Co. at the Harbor Court Hotel on Light Street in downtown Baltimore, he earlier had a career in theater. For nearly 15 years he taught and coached eighth-graders in acting -- and prepared them for School for the Arts auditions. Born in Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
August 4, 2002
IT SPEAKS volumes about bakery magnate John Paterakis' deep pockets and self-confidence that he has announced plans to construct a 200-room Four Seasons luxury resort even though the hospitality industry nationwide is in the doldrums. And he's not the only would-be hotel builder in Baltimore. Ritz-Carlton also hopes to introduce its top-tier brand here. Baltimore's current room capacity is so limited that such opulent establishments would be welcomed. But they should not be financed through taxpayer subsidies.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
Timothy Warren Green, who owned an Inner Harbor floral business and formerly taught eighth-graders bound for Baltimore's School for the Arts, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his Pikesville home. He was 45. The owner of the J.J. Cummings Floral Co. at the Harbor Court Hotel on Light Street in downtown Baltimore, he earlier had a career in theater. For nearly 15 years he taught and coached eighth-graders in acting -- and prepared them for School for the Arts auditions. Born in Hartford, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 4, 2000
Judy Kistner called Linwood Restaurant's feta-cheese-and-crab-meat salad "incredible." Tom Brady found Suburban Club's shrimp scampi "nice and spicy." And Dr. Joel Sereboff deemed Chef's Expressions' sea bass "outasight." Everyone had favorites at Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland's eighth annual Culinary Extravaganza. Fifteen local chefs lined the walls of Harbor Court Hotel's ballroom, wooden spoons and saute pans in hand -- offering a treasure trove of gourmet dishes to 300 hungry guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | December 9, 1999
York, Pa., artist Adrienne Stein is only 13 years old but has demonstrated an extraordinary, largely untutored natural facility for drawing and painting that her family has nurtured despite their relative isolation from mainstream art institutions.A selection of Stein's recent watercolors and oils, painted from life or from photographic reproductions in a naive, Impressionist-derived style, is on view at the Harbor Court Hotel Gallery in Baltimore through Jan. 31.The Harbor Court Hotel is at 550 Light St. The gallery is on the hotel's second floor and is open to the public free of charge.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
It wasn't the custom-made Irish linen. Ditto for the Italian marble or the handmade rugs, the silk wall coverings, the frescoes on the ceiling, or even those 5-inch color TV sets mounted in the guest bathrooms.Oh, those things are nice. But to the discriminating traveler, they're practically a given. What makes Baltimore's tony Harbor Court Hotel truly special -- at least in the eyes of the American Academy of Hospitality Services -- is the service. Period."You can look at marble and crystal all day," says Joseph Cinque, the academy's director of operations.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
While some fear that the stroke of midnight on Dec. 31 will bring the end of civilization as we know it, some businesses see it as the perfect time to cash in on those revelers who have no fear of power outages, stock market crashes or rampant madness.Many hotels and resorts are charging exorbitant prices, believing that people will pay any amount for what is being heavily hyped as a can't-miss, once-in-a-lifetime event.The Harbor Court Hotel in the Inner Harbor, for instance, is selling a two-night deluxe package -- including gourmet meals and entertainment -- for $6,550.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Bulky televisions - gone. Floral bedspreads - out of the picture. Desks where you plug in your laptop - so yesterday. Touches once found in the best hotels are going by the wayside in downtown Baltimore. The biggest hotels are spending millions of dollars to update and upgrade, to cater to tech-savvy guests and compete in a radically shifting hotel landscape. Hotels are going wireless in the guestrooms, smoothing "popcorn" ceilings, installing flat-screen computer monitors to double as TVs and making bedding more luxurious and lobbies more inviting.
NEWS
August 4, 2002
IT SPEAKS volumes about bakery magnate John Paterakis' deep pockets and self-confidence that he has announced plans to construct a 200-room Four Seasons luxury resort even though the hospitality industry nationwide is in the doldrums. And he's not the only would-be hotel builder in Baltimore. Ritz-Carlton also hopes to introduce its top-tier brand here. Baltimore's current room capacity is so limited that such opulent establishments would be welcomed. But they should not be financed through taxpayer subsidies.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
Call it the Ritz-Carlton South Baltimore.In what would be the sixth major hotel planned downtown, a Florida real estate developer is in negotiations to build a "five star" luxury hotel on the south side of the Inner Harbor, on land adjacent to the Rusty Scupper restaurant.Developer Neil Fisher said he has been discussing the $80 million project with several luxury hotel chains, but the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Co. of Atlanta appears to top the list."We're discussing the project with Ritz-Carlton," said Fisher, chief executive of North American Doctors Investment Fund Inc. "I think it would be a good fit with the harbor, and we believe we have a site that is second to none."
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | November 22, 1998
Social calendarNov. 22: Dorothy Friedman Caplan Guild's Tea for Two-Hundred, Harbor Court Hotel, 550 Light St. High tea and fashion show. Benefits cancer research and patient aid. 2:30 p.m. $30. Call 410-764-8321.Nov. 22: The Jewish Singles Social Network is holding a sixth anniversary party at Hurricanes nightclub (BWI Sheraton Hotel). Dressy casual. Hot buffet and cash bar. Raffle prizes. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. $12. Call 410-358-5776.Nov. 23: "A Grand Slam Celebration" marks Pam Shriver's 13th annual charity tennis challenge.
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