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By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
At one point during the three years that Harbor Bank of Maryland operated under heightened federal scrutiny, a regulator asked CEO Joseph Haskins Jr. why he stuck it out. Why not just retire? But for Haskins, one of the founders of the Baltimore bank in 1982, walking away was not an option. "I've grown up not running from a challenge, but facing it head on and looking to find a solution," said Haskins, 65. "And so, it isn't in my DNA to wilt under pressure. In fact, it only strengthens my resolve.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
At one point during the three years that Harbor Bank of Maryland operated under heightened federal scrutiny, a regulator asked CEO Joseph Haskins Jr. why he stuck it out. Why not just retire? But for Haskins, one of the founders of the Baltimore bank in 1982, walking away was not an option. "I've grown up not running from a challenge, but facing it head on and looking to find a solution," said Haskins, 65. "And so, it isn't in my DNA to wilt under pressure. In fact, it only strengthens my resolve.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Harbor Bank of Maryland, denied earlier this year in its attempt to buy the former Vermont Federal Building next door, plans to do the next best thing by leasing it after it is sold to another buyer at the end of the year.The company signed a lease last week to occupy the vacant building, at 25 W. Fayette St., and give up its current headquarters at 21 W. Fayette, according to officials representing the bank and the people who bought the building.Household Bank F.S.B., the former owner of the 49,000-square-foot building, signed a contract this week to sell the building to Baltimore real estate investors Samuel Boltansky, Larry Boltansky and Israel Freedman, who are principals in the Bofree Limited Partnership.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
The Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta has agreed to provide $1.3 million to fund affordable housing projects in Baltimore and Cecil County, Maryland's U.S. senators announced Wednesday. "As a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I have fought to put funds in the federal checkbook to develop affordable housing," Senator Barbara Mikulski said in a joint statement with Senator Ben Cardin. Developers will work with local member institutions of the Atlanta-based community development bank to construct or renovate 128 residential units, the senators said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
A former senior vice president at Harbor Bank of Maryland has been banned from banking after allegations that he engaged in unsafe banking practices, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. announced Friday. David M. Terrance, who also had been a senior lending officer at the Baltimore bank, agreed to the ban without admitting or denying any violations, according to the FDIC. Terrance started at the bank in October 2006 and left in February 2008. Joseph Haskins Jr., chairman and chief executive of Harbor Bank, said the activity in question occurred a couple of years ago. Haskins declined to provide details but said Terrance was found to have established a side business that rewarded him with profits while he made commercial loans for the bank.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Fueled by a growing number of home and commercial loans, Harbor Bank of Maryland's profit jumped 45 percent in the second quarter, the company said yesterday. The Baltimore-based bank made $451,947, in the quarter that ended June 30, up from $311,647, a year earlier. "I am pleased," said Joseph Haskins Jr., president and chief executive of Harbor Bank. "It has continued a positive trend. Our first two quarters have exceeded our budget expectations." For the first six months of the year, Harbor's earnings rose 34.3 percent to $830,763.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
A startup insurance company that opened in Baltimore last year with promises to offer more affordable policies to city residents said yesterday that it will begin selling its services at four branches of Harbor Bank of Maryland. American Skyline Insurance Co., which sells its own auto and home insurance policies, will keep its headquarters on Light Street, but hopes to reach more customers by locating in the lobbies of four branch banks in the city, effective immediately. "Financial services is a big part of what insurance is all about," said Ernest Hines, president and chief executive officer at American Skyline.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
A radio advertisement for a Baltimore bank says that Nancy S. Grasmick recommends its services, raising possible ethical questions for Maryland's superintendent of schools.On a commercial on radio station WBAL-AM, Dr. Grasmick's husband, lumber company executive Louis J. Grasmick, endorses Harbor Bank of Maryland and says his wife does, too."If you want a bank that's friendly, reliable and cares about your business, Nancy and I recommend the Harbor Bank of Maryland," Mr. Grasmick says.Later, an announcer urges listeners to visit a branch and says, "Like Lou and Nancy Grasmick, you will be convinced that the Harbor Bank of Maryland is Maryland's premier community bank."
NEWS
By Eric Addison | December 13, 1990
In the midst of all the bad news from the banking industry these days, the city's first and only minority-owned commercial bank, Harbor Bank of Maryland, can say that it has not been making headlines.Harbor Bank opened in Baltimore in September 1983. It now has assets of about $32.5 million, a loan portfolio of nearly $22 million and, according to the bank's president, Joseph Haskins Jr., it has been profitable since the end of its second year of operation."The original intent of the bank was to service the Baltimore metropolitan community, and essentially have a focus on providing banking services for the minority community.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2000
New positions Heidelmann joins Structural Preservation Structural Preservation Systems hired Georg Heidelmann as director of industrial market development for the Baltimore-based structural repair contractor. An engineering graduate of the University of Aachen in Germany, he was in charge of research and development for the Peiniger Group, based in Leverkusen, Germany. Advertising Gray promotes Yednock to chief operating officer Gray, Kirk/VanSant promoted Ken Yednock to chief operating officer for the Baltimore-based advertising and public relations agency.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Small businesses needing loans should think small — bankwise, that is. That's the finding of a new Internet tool that grades banks on their small-business lending. Banking Grades, which measures loans in relation to deposits, gives As and Bs to many community banks but Ds or worse to some banking behemoths. In Maryland, for instance, M&T Bank received a C — one of the best grades for a larger bank — while SunTrust and PNC received Ds. Bank of America got an F. Ouch! Meanwhile, lesser-known, smaller banks are taking home As. Those include the Harbor Bank of Maryland in Baltimore, Howard Bank in Ellicott City, Revere Bank in Anne Arundel County and Woodsboro Bank in Frederick County.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
A Reisterstown financial advisor was sentenced Friday to four years in prison followed by three years of supervised release for mail fraud in connection with defrauding clients, including a child suffering from cerebral palsy, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office announced. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine C. Blake also ordered Ralph Edward Thomas Jr. to pay $838,350 in restitution and to forfeit property in order to do so, including funds related to investment accounts, his home and his luxury cars.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
A Reisterstown financial advisor pleaded guilty in federal court in Baltimore on Wednesday to mail fraud in connection with the theft of more than $800,000 from accounts he managed for a child suffering from cerebral palsy and for an elderly client with dementia. Ralph Edward Thomas Jr., 52, a former vice president in a subsidiary of Harbor Bank, used more than $100,000 in stolen money from the child's trust fund to buy a home, the U.S. Attorney's office said. Thomas also obtained three mortgages valued at $205,000 on the home of the child's mother, using her name without her knowledge, authorities said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
A federal grand jury indicted a Baltimore financial adviser Tuesday for mail fraud in an alleged scheme to defraud vulnerable clients including an 85-year-old with dementia of more than $838,500, according to the U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland. Federal prosecutors say Ralph Edward Thomas Jr., 52, was vice president of a Harbor Bank subsidiary in late 2001 when he convinced a woman who was a trustee of her injured daughter's $3 million legal settlement to move the account to Harbor Bank.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
A Baltimore man was sentenced to 17 years in federal prison for armed bank robbery, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Maryland said Friday. Randolph Burke Wells, 46, signed a plea agreement with the government for the armed robbery last October of the Harbor Bank of Maryland on W. Fayette Street. Wells was given more than $3,500 in cash after pointing a gun at a teller, the government said. Wells was on supervised release for a previous federal bank robbery conviction when he was arrested last fall.
BUSINESS
By The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
PNC Financial Services Group Inc. plans to move its Greater Maryland regional headquarters from the Charles Center to the Inner Harbor by mid-2012, real estate brokerage CB Richard Ellis announced Tuesday. Bank officials have signed a lease that calls for PNC to occupy 119,000 square feet at One East Pratt St., the brokerage reported. PNC will move from the office tower at Two Hopkins Plaza beginning in July 2012. In addition to upper-level office space, the Pratt Street lease includes 7,000 square feet on the building's first floor to house a PNC Bank branch.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Baltimore's Downtown Partnership has hired former Harbor Bank of Maryland President Joseph L. Aston as its new director of business development, asking the 55-year-old banker to help capital-strapped small downtown businesses and attract minority merchants to downtown."
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2004
Harbor Bank is accustomed to taking over houses but not necessarily this way. "We've never taken on property directly like this other than when we have to repossess a home," said Joseph Haskins Jr., Harbor's chairman and chief executive. The bank will use a $100,000 Maryland Community Legacy grant to buy and renovate 30 vacant and dilapidated houses in Northwest Baltimore's Pimlico neighborhood. Harbor Bank plans to sell the rehabilitated homes and use the proceeds to rehabilitate more houses in the area.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
A former senior vice president at Harbor Bank of Maryland has been banned from banking after allegations that he engaged in unsafe banking practices, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. announced Friday. David M. Terrance, who also had been a senior lending officer at the Baltimore bank, agreed to the ban without admitting or denying any violations, according to the FDIC. Terrance started at the bank in October 2006 and left in February 2008. Joseph Haskins Jr., chairman and chief executive of Harbor Bank, said the activity in question occurred a couple of years ago. Haskins declined to provide details but said Terrance was found to have established a side business that rewarded him with profits while he made commercial loans for the bank.
NEWS
January 31, 2007
Whoever raised concerns with Harbor Bank over the mayoral candidacy of its employee, Baltimore Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., didn't do the city or Mayor Sheila Dixon any favors. The complaints led this week to his being placed on an unpaid leave of absence in an action that smacks of political intimidation. Harbor Bank President Joseph Haskins Jr. isn't saying who complained, just that he decided to rethink keeping Mr. Mitchell on the payroll as a business development officer after receiving "too many calls" that questioned Mr. Mitchell's mayoral ambitions and his work at the bank.
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