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By New York Times News Service | April 9, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Ten days after Zimbabwe voted and by most accounts rejected its long-serving, autocratic president, the mood of the country grew more ominous yesterday. The opposition reported widespread attacks on its supporters, black youths drove white farmers off their land and elections officials were arrested on charges of vote tampering. As President Robert G. Mugabe sought to cling to power beyond his 28th year in office, Zimbabwe's High Court began to weigh the opposition Movement for Democratic Change's demand for the immediate release of the presidential election results.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2000
MUTOKO, Zimbabwe - In 1975, at age 17, Maxwell Hodzi left his family in this rural mountain village eager to fight alongside Robert Mugabe in a liberation war against white rule. Now, some 20 years after victory, as his country teeters on the brink of economic ruin, Hodzi appears ready to go to battle again for his president and former commander. Wearing a black beret, Hodzi led a group of teen-agers in Mugabe T-shirts down the potholed streets of his hometown over the weekend hoping to develop a new generation of ruling party members.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 29, 2000
HARARE, Zimbabwe - Getting rid of President Robert G. Mugabe isn't easy, but the opposition that made unprecedented inroads in summer's parliamentary elections is trying its darndest to topple one of Africa's abiding autocrats. They criticize him openly, calling him evil, a tyrant and a racist. They travel the world attempting to build international pressure against a government they say is lawless and corrupt. Last month, in their latest effort to push Mugabe from power, they started impeachment proceedings against the 76-year-old leader.
NEWS
August 16, 2002
IT COULDN'T be any clearer if novelist Richard Preston had previewed it in his latest bioterrorism thriller. Any federal investigator trying to unearth the anthrax mailer who terrorized the nation last fall would want to speak with Dr. Steven J. Hatfill. He's a scientist knowledgeable about anthrax who commissioned a study on the danger of an airborne attack of the bacteria. He has worked at the nation's top biodefense laboratory and described the ease with which deadly germs can be cooked up at home.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 18, 2002
BEITBRIDGE, South Africa - One measure of just how troubled life has become in Zimbabwe is the wad of Zimbabwe dollar bills tucked in Chris Murehwa's pocket. Murehwa is a smuggler. More politely, a cross-border profiteer. And here at South Africa's border with Zimbabwe, along the banks of the Limpopo River, his business has never been better. As food shortages and economic and political chaos cripple Zimbabwe, Murehwa is making a small fortune supplying desperately needed goods through Zimbabwe's black market.
NEWS
By Neely Tucker and Neely Tucker,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 12, 1999
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- When soft-spoken Vennia Magaya was evicted from her deceased father's house, her TV set and oven thrown out into the yard after her, she thought it wasn't right.So she sued her half-brother for evicting her.She had a compelling case. The nation's constitution, a separate law enforcing women's rights and several international human-rights treaties that Zimbabwe has signed clearly backed her claim as heir to her father's estate.But in a stunning reversal of fortune for Zimbabwean women in particular and African women in general, the nation's Supreme Court overruled or challenged almost every law relating to women's rights in Zimbabwe and gave the house to her half-brother.
NEWS
By Jean Packard and Jean Packard,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- The problems of African libraries include those familiar anywhere, such as funding, staffing and keeping up with advancing technology. But in Zimbabwe, librarians also must find books in 19 local languages and 43 dialects.But there is no shortage of enthusiasm. In honor of the Zimbabwe International Book Fair last summer, war veterans who had been demonstrating for higher pensions suspended their protest. Youth and children's groups treated the assembled publishers, book-sellers and librarians to dramatic readings and musical performances extolling the importance of books in their lives.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 3, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Less than a week before Zimbabwe's presidential election, the campaign of opposition candidate Morgan Tsvangirai would appear to be in shambles. He has been charged with high treason - a crime punishable by death - for an alleged plot to assassinate President Robert G. Mugabe. His supporters have been beaten up by mobs. Police officers have shot at his motorcade. But first as a labor leader and now as a political candidate, Tsvangirai (CHAN-ger-i) is one of the few Zimbabweans who has been able to stand up to Mugabe's regime.
NEWS
March 9, 2002
ZIMBABWE'S "First Chimurenga" was its unsuccessful attempt in the 1850s to repel British colonists. The second liberation struggle brought Robert Mugabe to power in 1980. The president now calls this weekend's presidential election the "Third Chimurenga" - a crucial test of self-determination. This it is. But at stake this time is Zimbabwe's future as a stable country of laws and fair processes. Already, President Mugabe, 78, has let it be known he will reject the voters' verdict if he is not re-elected.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 1, 2008
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- The main opposition party pressed its claim yesterday that it had won a landslide election victory to unseat Zimbabwe President Robert G. Mugabe, but the government said nothing about the presidential vote 48 hours after ballots had been cast. The only official announcement was that both sides were tied in early parliamentary results. At a news conference yesterday, officials from the opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change, claimed to have seen the results from more than half of the constituencies and that, according to their calculations, the opposition presidential candidate, Morgan Tsvangirai, had won 60 percent of the presidential vote to beat the 84-year-old Mugabe.
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