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May 3, 1993
Tennis Straight-set victories by Goran Ivanisevic and Goran Prpic gave Croatia a 3-2 win over Zimbabwe in their Davis Cup match in Harare, Zimbabwe.
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NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | April 6, 2008
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai accused Zimbabwe's authorities yesterday of preparing a "war against the people" to intimidate opposition voters in a presidential runoff. The accusation came as a document purporting to represent the opposition's "transition" plans circulated here in the capital, prominently featuring a "hit list" of bureaucrats and security officials who would be purged. A spokesman for the opposition Movement for Democratic Change scoffed at the authenticity of the document, saying it was merely another sortie in the regime's battle to prevent Tsvangirai from taking power by frightening the higher echelons of the bureaucracy and security services.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 2007
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Keith Charumbira had just stepped off a minivan taxi in southwest Harare three weeks ago, fresh from a Friday evening gathering of civic advocates in Zimbabwe's capital city, when he saw the knot of policemen walking toward him. It was too late to flee. "They started asking questions," Charumbira said: "`Why are you active in an opposition party that is against the needs of the government? Don't you know you are part of a leadership that is leading to violence?' " The officers rifled through his pockets, Charumbira said, and took his cash, amounting to about $60. Then, for the next 20 minutes, they beat him. "They used batons," he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 2007
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Keith Charumbira had just stepped off a minivan taxi in southwest Harare three weeks ago, fresh from a Friday evening gathering of civic advocates in Zimbabwe's capital city, when he saw the knot of policemen walking toward him. It was too late to flee. "They started asking questions," Charumbira said: "`Why are you active in an opposition party that is against the needs of the government? Don't you know you are part of a leadership that is leading to violence?' " The officers rifled through his pockets, Charumbira said, and took his cash, amounting to about $60. Then, for the next 20 minutes, they beat him. "They used batons," he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Hundreds of Zimbabwe's riot police officers violently crushed yesterday an attempt by protesters to hold what they called a prayer meeting in one of the capital's largest slums to express opposition to President Robert G. Mugabe's rule. Beatrice Mtetwa, a civil rights lawyer in Harare, the capital, said at least 35 people had been arrested, including the leaders of the two rival political factions that oppose Mugabe's governing party, the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | April 6, 2008
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai accused Zimbabwe's authorities yesterday of preparing a "war against the people" to intimidate opposition voters in a presidential runoff. The accusation came as a document purporting to represent the opposition's "transition" plans circulated here in the capital, prominently featuring a "hit list" of bureaucrats and security officials who would be purged. A spokesman for the opposition Movement for Democratic Change scoffed at the authenticity of the document, saying it was merely another sortie in the regime's battle to prevent Tsvangirai from taking power by frightening the higher echelons of the bureaucracy and security services.
NEWS
By Hativagone Mushonga | September 3, 2006
HARARE, ZIMBABWE -- It's hard to image that in a country with the world's highest inflation rate, high unemployment and chronic food shortages, people are worried that the worst is yet to come. Yet after six years of a political and economic free-fall, many here believe that the bottom still isn't in sight, as least not as long as President Robert G. Mugabe remains in power. Most Zimbabweans have assumed that something would happen to rein in their country's precipitous decline. Instead, they have watched as conditions have gone from bad to worse.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 11, 1995
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Leonard looked around his small apartment and realized he had been robbed. Someone who was staying with him for a few days had taken his television set and CD player.He knew who had done it -- but Leonard was nervous about going to the police, because Leonard is gay, making him one of the targets of new, somewhat bewildering attacks from Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe's increasingly autocratic president. In speeches, Mr. Mugabe has taken to criticizing homosexuals as "sexual perverts" and insisting that they have no political rights.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 21, 2000
HARARE, Zimbabwe - President Robert Mugabe has dismissed Ian Smith, the last white leader of this nation, as nothing but a "ghost" of its ugly colonial past. But ghosts haunt. And as Smith has watched the nation he once dubbed the "jewel of Africa" crumble, he has been one of the most outspoken critics of its downfall. "There are no jobs. We have one of the highest rates of unemployment in the world. We are churning out 300,000 students of higher institutions every year, and less than 10 percent get jobs.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 23, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The United Nations harshly criticized Zimbabwe yesterday for creating a "disastrous" humanitarian crisis through a vast slum-clearing project that has left 700,000 people homeless or jobless in the middle of winter. The comments in the report included unusually harsh criticism of President Robert G. Mugabe, who has been in office since 1980. But it is unclear whether the condemnation will loosen his hold on power, even as the country sinks further into poverty.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Hundreds of Zimbabwe's riot police officers violently crushed yesterday an attempt by protesters to hold what they called a prayer meeting in one of the capital's largest slums to express opposition to President Robert G. Mugabe's rule. Beatrice Mtetwa, a civil rights lawyer in Harare, the capital, said at least 35 people had been arrested, including the leaders of the two rival political factions that oppose Mugabe's governing party, the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front.
NEWS
By Erik German and Erik German,Newsday | December 17, 2006
VICTORIA FALLS, Zimbabwe -- A few miles south of the empty luxury hotels in this once-dazzling tourist spot, dozens of gaunt young men survive by scavenging food from the town dump. Allan Sibanda, 23, has been coming here on and off for the past five years, scuffling with baboons and vultures for the least-rotten scraps. Since midsummer, garbage has been his sole source of food, he said. "I think a lot about the way I'm living," he said, watching the horizon anxiously for the next rubbish truck.
NEWS
By Hativagone Mushonga | September 3, 2006
HARARE, ZIMBABWE -- It's hard to image that in a country with the world's highest inflation rate, high unemployment and chronic food shortages, people are worried that the worst is yet to come. Yet after six years of a political and economic free-fall, many here believe that the bottom still isn't in sight, as least not as long as President Robert G. Mugabe remains in power. Most Zimbabweans have assumed that something would happen to rein in their country's precipitous decline. Instead, they have watched as conditions have gone from bad to worse.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 23, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The United Nations harshly criticized Zimbabwe yesterday for creating a "disastrous" humanitarian crisis through a vast slum-clearing project that has left 700,000 people homeless or jobless in the middle of winter. The comments in the report included unusually harsh criticism of President Robert G. Mugabe, who has been in office since 1980. But it is unclear whether the condemnation will loosen his hold on power, even as the country sinks further into poverty.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
His critics accuse President Robert G. Mugabe, who has run Zimbabwe since the African nation became independent from Britain 21 years ago, of destroying democracy and ruining the country. Mugabe blames Zimbabwe's troubles on others, including the former colonial power, Britain, and the news media. He says outsiders, especially whites, dislike a legitimate campaign of land reform that is distributing farms to deserving, and landless, blacks. The country has its troubles: Militants, sanctioned by the government, have been steadily driving whites off their farms, allowing squatters to move in. During a wave of assaults last week, 23 farms were looted and the landowners were forced to flee.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 21, 2000
HARARE, Zimbabwe - President Robert Mugabe has dismissed Ian Smith, the last white leader of this nation, as nothing but a "ghost" of its ugly colonial past. But ghosts haunt. And as Smith has watched the nation he once dubbed the "jewel of Africa" crumble, he has been one of the most outspoken critics of its downfall. "There are no jobs. We have one of the highest rates of unemployment in the world. We are churning out 300,000 students of higher institutions every year, and less than 10 percent get jobs.
NEWS
By Erik German and Erik German,Newsday | December 17, 2006
VICTORIA FALLS, Zimbabwe -- A few miles south of the empty luxury hotels in this once-dazzling tourist spot, dozens of gaunt young men survive by scavenging food from the town dump. Allan Sibanda, 23, has been coming here on and off for the past five years, scuffling with baboons and vultures for the least-rotten scraps. Since midsummer, garbage has been his sole source of food, he said. "I think a lot about the way I'm living," he said, watching the horizon anxiously for the next rubbish truck.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
His critics accuse President Robert G. Mugabe, who has run Zimbabwe since the African nation became independent from Britain 21 years ago, of destroying democracy and ruining the country. Mugabe blames Zimbabwe's troubles on others, including the former colonial power, Britain, and the news media. He says outsiders, especially whites, dislike a legitimate campaign of land reform that is distributing farms to deserving, and landless, blacks. The country has its troubles: Militants, sanctioned by the government, have been steadily driving whites off their farms, allowing squatters to move in. During a wave of assaults last week, 23 farms were looted and the landowners were forced to flee.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 11, 1995
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Leonard looked around his small apartment and realized he had been robbed. Someone who was staying with him for a few days had taken his television set and CD player.He knew who had done it -- but Leonard was nervous about going to the police, because Leonard is gay, making him one of the targets of new, somewhat bewildering attacks from Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe's increasingly autocratic president. In speeches, Mr. Mugabe has taken to criticizing homosexuals as "sexual perverts" and insisting that they have no political rights.
SPORTS
May 3, 1993
Tennis Straight-set victories by Goran Ivanisevic and Goran Prpic gave Croatia a 3-2 win over Zimbabwe in their Davis Cup match in Harare, Zimbabwe.
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