Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHar Homa
IN THE NEWS

Har Homa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 5, 1997
ISRAEL AND the Palestinian Authority are each trying to change facts before beginning negotiations on the final status of Palestine this month. Each is outraged that the other is doing so.Israel's decision to begin construction of Har Homa, completing a ring of settlements around East Jerusalem, is a case in point. One purpose is to render impossible the incorporation of the Arab part of Jerusalem into the Palestinian state (be it sovereign or less). Denial of Jewish access to holy places when Jordan ruled East Jerusalem inspires the passion with which most Israelis demand the unity of Jerusalem.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Hagit Ofran | February 28, 2008
JERUSALEM -- Every few days, Israel's prime minister repeats his commitment to freeze West Bank settlements and remove illegal outposts. Such commitments and statements from successive Israeli governments have been a part of our lives since the 1993 Oslo agreement. However, since then, the number of the settlers in the occupied territories has more than doubled. Palestinians interpret that surge as proof that Israel doesn't really want peace. Otherwise, they say, why would it continue to build in areas it intends to evacuate?
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 15, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Overriding the objections of the Palestinians and many of his foreign allies, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is forging ahead with a controversial housing development in predominantly Arab East Jerusalem.Work will begin next week, possibly as soon as Monday."I am building Har Homa this week, and nothing is going to stop me," Netanyahu said in an interview published yesterday in the Israeli newspaper Ma'ariv. "If they think they can frighten us, they are mistaken. I am determined about my view more than ever."
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | February 13, 2008
JERUSALEM -- Israel unveiled plans yesterday to build 1,120 apartments for Jews in East Jerusalem, a move the Palestinians called a new setback for U.S.-backed peace negotiations. The announcement by Housing Minister Zeev Boim appeared to be aimed at placating the Shas religious party, which had vowed to quit the coalition government if it conceded anything to the Palestinians on Jerusalem. Shas had criticized a government freeze on approval of new Jewish housing projects in territory claimed by the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | December 25, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Meeting for the second time this month as part of a new U.S.-influenced peace effort, Israeli and Palestinian negotiators bogged down again yesterday over familiar issues: proposed Israeli construction in areas that the Palestinians claim for a future state and Israel's demand that the Palestinians crack down on armed groups. The two sides have made no apparent progress since President Bush convened the peace conference last month in an effort to revive serious peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians.
NEWS
March 27, 1997
THE HAPPY FESTIVAL of Purim was marred in Israel by two atrocities that are all too familiar. They do not justify a relaxation in the search for peace. Nor do they vindicate construction of an Israeli housing development at Har Homa, extending Jerusalem. They do serve to remind the world of attacks that Israelis have had to endure.President Clinton rightly responded by sending Middle East envoy Dennis Ross back to rescue an accord he had only recently cobbled back together. He may not succeed, but the potential loss is too great not to make the effort.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 29, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Israel and the Palestinian authority took a step yesterday toward reviving the moribund Middle East peace talks, although neither side offered any concessions on the critical issues that have deadlocked the process for months.Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy and Nabil Sha'ath, the Palestinian minister of planning and international cooperation, jointly announced a resumption of talks between committees discussing several secondary issues in the peace process. But Sha'ath emphasized that the critical issues that led to a deadlock -- the future of Jerusalem, construction of Israeli settlements and final status talks -- "still await solution."
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | February 13, 2008
JERUSALEM -- Israel unveiled plans yesterday to build 1,120 apartments for Jews in East Jerusalem, a move the Palestinians called a new setback for U.S.-backed peace negotiations. The announcement by Housing Minister Zeev Boim appeared to be aimed at placating the Shas religious party, which had vowed to quit the coalition government if it conceded anything to the Palestinians on Jerusalem. Shas had criticized a government freeze on approval of new Jewish housing projects in territory claimed by the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Amid heavy security, Israel began work as promised on a controversial housing settlement in Arab East Jerusalem yesterday while Palestinians peacefully denounced the project from their perch on a nearby hilltop.Four bulldozers cut through the rocky slopes of the mountain Jews know as Har Homa. No incidents occurred there, despite warnings that the equipment's arrival would provoke violence. But the military kept most Palestinians from the site.When the bulldozers left the site around dusk, a small group of youngsters threw stones at the departing equipment.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 1997
JERUSALEM -- It was a different kind of protest. No stone-throwing. No bullets.The men of Umm Tuba lined the soccer field with their prayer rugs and knelt. Facing the rocky slopes of Jabal Abu Ghneim, they asked God to save their pine-forested mountain from the Israelis.The Palestinian villagers arrived at this disputed hillside for the noon prayer yesterday, the Muslim holy day. In two weeks, bulldozers might appear at the foot of the mountain to begin work on a new Jewish neighborhood.Israel gave the go-ahead this week to build the 6,500-unit project in southeast Jerusalem on the hill Israelis call Har Homa.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | December 25, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Meeting for the second time this month as part of a new U.S.-influenced peace effort, Israeli and Palestinian negotiators bogged down again yesterday over familiar issues: proposed Israeli construction in areas that the Palestinians claim for a future state and Israel's demand that the Palestinians crack down on armed groups. The two sides have made no apparent progress since President Bush convened the peace conference last month in an effort to revive serious peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 29, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Israel and the Palestinian authority took a step yesterday toward reviving the moribund Middle East peace talks, although neither side offered any concessions on the critical issues that have deadlocked the process for months.Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy and Nabil Sha'ath, the Palestinian minister of planning and international cooperation, jointly announced a resumption of talks between committees discussing several secondary issues in the peace process. But Sha'ath emphasized that the critical issues that led to a deadlock -- the future of Jerusalem, construction of Israeli settlements and final status talks -- "still await solution."
NEWS
March 27, 1997
THE HAPPY FESTIVAL of Purim was marred in Israel by two atrocities that are all too familiar. They do not justify a relaxation in the search for peace. Nor do they vindicate construction of an Israeli housing development at Har Homa, extending Jerusalem. They do serve to remind the world of attacks that Israelis have had to endure.President Clinton rightly responded by sending Middle East envoy Dennis Ross back to rescue an accord he had only recently cobbled back together. He may not succeed, but the potential loss is too great not to make the effort.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Amid heavy security, Israel began work as promised on a controversial housing settlement in Arab East Jerusalem yesterday while Palestinians peacefully denounced the project from their perch on a nearby hilltop.Four bulldozers cut through the rocky slopes of the mountain Jews know as Har Homa. No incidents occurred there, despite warnings that the equipment's arrival would provoke violence. But the military kept most Palestinians from the site.When the bulldozers left the site around dusk, a small group of youngsters threw stones at the departing equipment.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 15, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Overriding the objections of the Palestinians and many of his foreign allies, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is forging ahead with a controversial housing development in predominantly Arab East Jerusalem.Work will begin next week, possibly as soon as Monday."I am building Har Homa this week, and nothing is going to stop me," Netanyahu said in an interview published yesterday in the Israeli newspaper Ma'ariv. "If they think they can frighten us, they are mistaken. I am determined about my view more than ever."
NEWS
March 15, 1997
Har Homa is vacant, Jewish-owned landI realize that in the grand scheme of things editorial cartoons don't count for very much, but the one by KAL appearing March 4 betrays such a lack of understanding of the decision by the Israeli government to construct housing on Har Homa.For starters, the placard proclaiming ''New Construction in Arab Jerusalem'' reveals that your cartoonist doesn't know where the project is to be built. The only area that might be called ''Arab'' Jerusalem is rather specific, and doesn't include the proposed site.
NEWS
By Hagit Ofran | February 28, 2008
JERUSALEM -- Every few days, Israel's prime minister repeats his commitment to freeze West Bank settlements and remove illegal outposts. Such commitments and statements from successive Israeli governments have been a part of our lives since the 1993 Oslo agreement. However, since then, the number of the settlers in the occupied territories has more than doubled. Palestinians interpret that surge as proof that Israel doesn't really want peace. Otherwise, they say, why would it continue to build in areas it intends to evacuate?
NEWS
March 15, 1997
Har Homa is vacant, Jewish-owned landI realize that in the grand scheme of things editorial cartoons don't count for very much, but the one by KAL appearing March 4 betrays such a lack of understanding of the decision by the Israeli government to construct housing on Har Homa.For starters, the placard proclaiming ''New Construction in Arab Jerusalem'' reveals that your cartoonist doesn't know where the project is to be built. The only area that might be called ''Arab'' Jerusalem is rather specific, and doesn't include the proposed site.
NEWS
March 5, 1997
ISRAEL AND the Palestinian Authority are each trying to change facts before beginning negotiations on the final status of Palestine this month. Each is outraged that the other is doing so.Israel's decision to begin construction of Har Homa, completing a ring of settlements around East Jerusalem, is a case in point. One purpose is to render impossible the incorporation of the Arab part of Jerusalem into the Palestinian state (be it sovereign or less). Denial of Jewish access to holy places when Jordan ruled East Jerusalem inspires the passion with which most Israelis demand the unity of Jerusalem.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 1997
JERUSALEM -- It was a different kind of protest. No stone-throwing. No bullets.The men of Umm Tuba lined the soccer field with their prayer rugs and knelt. Facing the rocky slopes of Jabal Abu Ghneim, they asked God to save their pine-forested mountain from the Israelis.The Palestinian villagers arrived at this disputed hillside for the noon prayer yesterday, the Muslim holy day. In two weeks, bulldozers might appear at the foot of the mountain to begin work on a new Jewish neighborhood.Israel gave the go-ahead this week to build the 6,500-unit project in southeast Jerusalem on the hill Israelis call Har Homa.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.