Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHappy Days
IN THE NEWS

Happy Days

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 6, 2013
Economist John Kenneth Galbraith once observed that there are two kinds of market forecasters, those who don't know and those who don't know they don't know. That is well illustrated by the current disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street, as the market's leading indicator, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, continues to surge forward while the overall outlook for the U.S. economy appears mixed at best. The Dow closed Tuesday at an all-time peak of 14,253.77, and many believe that the bullish trend will continue even if there is some profit-taking in the short term.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 24, 2013
Since the economic disaster of 2008 sent incomes spinning downward and the jobless rate shooting upward, at least one group of Americans has found a path back to prosperity: the top 1 percent. Over the last four years, the super rich have been able to rake in 95 percent of all income gains. That's right. According to a new study done by Emmanuel Saez, an economics professor at the University of California, Berkeley, while the number of poor Americans has risen and members of the middle class are mired at diminished income levels, the wealthiest Americans are back in the money.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
I've lived in Maryland for my entire life, and I didn't even know that Frederick County had its own holiday on November 23rd until this week. On this week's episode of J. Doug at Night , House of Delegates candidate Darren Wigfield introduced us to the concept of Repudiation Day, the first act of defiance by British Colonists against the stamp act. The day was made a holiday by the Maryland General Assembly during its 1894 session....
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 3, 1992
"Oh, Happy Days..." went the lyric from the popular sitcom, a clear rejection of any pretension toward the social relevance of other series airing in the same years (1974-84), such as "All in the Family" and "M*A*S*H."There is a trove of trivia surrounding the show, which is being celebrated on ABC tonight with "The Happy Days Reunion Special." (The program, at 9:30 p.m. on Channel 13, is reviewed on Page 1C in Accent today.)1. When were the key elements of the series actually first seen?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 9, 1997
To Chachi or not to Chachi? That's the question on Nick-at-Nite this week.Through Friday, Nickelodeon will be devoting eight hours of its daily evening programming to reruns of "Happy Days" (8: 30 p.m.-12: 30 a.m.), that '70s sitcom about how wonderful and harmless life was in the '50s. But this isn't just any old "Happy Days" marathon. For the folks at Nick have a question to ask:Do you prefer your "Happy Days" with or without Chachi?Chachi, you'll recall, was Fonzie's cousin, played by that renowned thespian Scott Baio.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 3, 1992
It's all there: Henry Winkler and Marion Ross necking on the set of "Happy Days"; Winkler explaining how ABC wouldn't let his character, Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli, wear a leather jacket at first because network executives thought the jacket made him look "too much like a hood"; Robin Williams' first network TV appearance as an alien named Mork visiting the Cunninghams of Milwaukee.Yes, it's all there in the "Happy Days Reunion," at 9:30 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13). But, as promising as those three moments might sound, that's as good as it gets.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 3, 1992
It's all there: Henry Winkler and Marion Ross necking on the set of "Happy Days"; Winkler explaining how ABC wouldn't let his character, Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli, wear a leather jacket at first because network executives thought the jacket made him look "too much like a hood"; Robin Williams' first network TV appearance as an alien named Mork visiting the Cunninghams of Milwaukee.Yes, it's all there in the "Happy Days Reunion," at 9:30 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13). But, as promising as those three moments might sound, that's as good as it gets.
NEWS
By JEFFREY M. SANDMAN | May 16, 1993
Back when one of three American workers belonged to a union and labor had strong Democratic allies in the White House, the party's theme song was "Happy Days Are Here Again." Now that a dozen years of anti-union Republican rule are over, one question with important ramifications for the economy and working families is: Are happy days here again for the labor movement? Recent developments suggest that if "happy" isn't the most apt term, at least better days are here.For example:* In the first major organizing election of 1993, the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA)
NEWS
By Richard Horrmann and Richard Horrmann,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
"Do you know what it's like to never have had someone turn to you and say, 'I love you'?"Eight months after filming, these words, softly uttered by Aurora Greenway's housekeeper in the new film "The Evening Star," still bring tears to Marion Ross' eyes.As well they should. For not only do they signal a defining moment in this long-awaited sequel to "Terms of Endearment," they also are the words that landed Ross a role in the movie, the biggest part she's ever had in a feature film -- and they're the words that just might land her an Oscar.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 24, 2013
Since the economic disaster of 2008 sent incomes spinning downward and the jobless rate shooting upward, at least one group of Americans has found a path back to prosperity: the top 1 percent. Over the last four years, the super rich have been able to rake in 95 percent of all income gains. That's right. According to a new study done by Emmanuel Saez, an economics professor at the University of California, Berkeley, while the number of poor Americans has risen and members of the middle class are mired at diminished income levels, the wealthiest Americans are back in the money.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
Economist John Kenneth Galbraith once observed that there are two kinds of market forecasters, those who don't know and those who don't know they don't know. That is well illustrated by the current disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street, as the market's leading indicator, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, continues to surge forward while the overall outlook for the U.S. economy appears mixed at best. The Dow closed Tuesday at an all-time peak of 14,253.77, and many believe that the bullish trend will continue even if there is some profit-taking in the short term.
EXPLORE
April 18, 2012
Happy Earth Day, dear readers, It's this Sunday, April 22. In celebration, on Saturday, (April 21) join the annual River Sweep event along the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. from Tydings Park to the Susquehanna Museum at the Lock House. For details, phone 410-457-2482, 410-939-7644 or 410-808-6118 or email peter.d.green@att.net . April 22 is Earth Day celebrated by people around the world to build awareness and inspire environmental change. Visit http://www.earthday.net . April 27 is National Arbor Day - plant a tree!
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
With "Grease" and "Hairspray" already revisiting the 1950s and 1960s, Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia might have bored the crowd with another familiar show by putting on "Happy Days" — but the production results in a lively, entertaining evening. More than just another look through rose-colored glasses at the popular sitcom, this musical set in 1959 Milwaukee celebrates the heroes from the 1970s TV show and still has its own cheerful bouncy appeal to audiences today. The "Happy Days" television show, which aired for a decade starting in 1974, focused on the Cunningham family — teenager Richie, his parents, hardware store owner Howard and homemaker Marion, and Richie's younger sister, Joanie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2011
For the record: Julie Shanklin did not, as a 16-year-old girl in the 1970s, take up the hem of her Gino's uniform to make it a mini-dress. She was 5 foot 11, OK? And because she was so tall, the red-and-white dress was short on her, even by 1970s standards. "My mom was like, 'Is there any hem we could let out?'" There was not, so Shanklin paired her uniform with the ruffled bloomers her mother wore square dancing. "It would have been obscene. " Even with obscenity averted, Shanklin caught the eye of Harold Autry, also 16 and working as a cook at the same Gino's in Montgomery County.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 25, 2010
You must understand if some of us are feeling a little blue after hearing of the deaths last week of actors Barbara Billingsley and Tom Bosley. The passing of "June Cleaver" and "Mr. C" produced that vague sorrow, that echo of grief that comes when you think of your own long-dead parents. Even in middle age, you can feel like an orphan. "Leave it to Beaver," a 1950s show about a suburban family, and "Happy Days," a 1970s show about a 1950s suburban family, allowed those of us of a certain age to watch ourselves grow up — twice — even if the families on the small screen in no way resembled our own. Television has always had that kind of through-the-looking-glass quality.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
Happy days are here again. The new slots facility on the highway will provide jobs for all, money for the children, and a chicken in every oven. Don't worry; be happy. And pay no attention to that man behind the curtain. Jim Tabeling, Baltimore
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
Elvis has left the building. More specifically, a 7-foot-tall statue of the king appears to have been stolen from atop the Happy Day Diner in Rosedale, where he'd stood for nearly a decade. Customers alerted owners Maria and Dimitrios Pigiaditis to the missing statue Sunday morning, and they filed a report with Baltimore County police. Elvis was bolted to the roof, and the thieves apparently broke him off, leaving behind part of his feet. The couple reviewed surveillance tapes, which they have turned over to police, and saw a white van pull up overnight Wednesday, when they think the theft occurred.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.