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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 10, 2009
TALIBAN, THE SEQUEL: Columnist Ellen Goodman writes, "Somewhere in southern Afghanistan another little girl is being 'protected' from school ... This is happening on our watch." For the full commentary, go to baltimoresun.com/opinion
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 28, 1995
I have a year-end question for you. If the city is in trouble, how come so many new restaurants opened downtown in 1995, while nothing much was happening in the suburbs?The year's big news as far as restaurants were concerned was two places so new I haven't even eaten in them yet. (I like to give restaurants at least a month before I review them.) The Joy America Cafe in the new American Visionary Art Museum already has a reputation for being offbeat, creative, visually stunning -- both food and decor -- and expensive.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
It's been more than three weeks since Michael Brown was shot by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo. After all that time, the average citizen has learned little factual information. I don't mean about the current closed grand jury investigation but things we as citizens should know and reporters could report. First, what do we know of Michael Brown? Did reporters interview family and friends to get an insight into who he was? Was he, as the video in the store implied, a bully? What kind of student was he?
SPORTS
May 9, 1998
Quote: "The bottom line is that we're getting behind and we're having to play catch-up. We're just in one of those little streaks right now when a lot of good things aren't happening." -- Rangers manager Johnny Oates on his team's having lost five of six games and having hit .219.It's a fact: The Mariners went 2-for-19 with runners in scoring position Thursday night against the Blue Jays.Who's hot: The Indians' Omar Vizquel, who went 2-for-5 last night, is hitting .325.Who's not: The Rangers' Aaron Sele (5-2)
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | November 30, 1993
TOKYO -- A continuing collapse in the Japanese stock market has raised the prospect that Western reality has finally taken hold of the Japanese economic miracle.After years of strong growth, Japan is suffering through its most painful recession since World War II, and with the protracted economic decline, the ebullient confidence that supported share prices on lofty clouds of expectations seems to have collapsed.The benchmark Nikkei Index of 225 stocks has declined 24 percent since August and was hammered yesterday during its worst session of the year, although stocks regained some ground today.
SPORTS
By Jayson Stark and Jayson Stark,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 10, 1992
Nobody knows exactly how it is that a ballplayer suddenly turns into a star.You can't find the latest stardom breakthroughs listed in the transactions column. They don't break into network programming to announce them. And, these days, you can't even measure star quality by the size of a guy's paycheck.No, this stardom stuff just kind of happens. And it is happening right now in front of your very eyes.It is happening to California's Bryan Harvey, suddenly the best short reliever on Earth.
NEWS
November 14, 1997
UNLESS YOU KNOW where you are, it is difficult to get where you need to be. It's important to keep that truism in mind in assessing the shockingly poor results of new achievement tests administered to children in Baltimore City's elementary schools.The September tests were given to all Baltimore elementary students in grades one through five. They show that city children enter first grade only a few months behind national norms in basic skills. Yet five years later, the achievement levels of these students have fallen as much as a grade-and-a-half behind in reading and about a grade behind in math.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 9, 2003
CHANDRA Fernando's hands rest in her lap like sleeping butterflies. She seems the very heart of all gentleness in the world. But, in her little cottage in Hagerstown yesterday, she recalled that hour of national trauma two Septembers ago and talked about a children's book she has written. It is the stuff that restores souls. Called A Little Book of Peace, the book offers lotus blossoms and nightingales in place of airplanes crashing and buildings going down. It is a kind of haiku distillation of her philosophy, and her career, and her life.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 25, 1992
In Ms. Fussell's sixth grade math class at Hampstead Hill Middle School, in East Baltimore, a thing is happening last week that has nothing to do with addition, or fractions, or computing the distance from Baltimore to New York in kilometers, whatever they are.The day has been turned over to the violence in children's lives, to changing this condition which stays with us like a stain. And the thing happening in this classroom is at once heartfelt and frightening."It's not just happening in your neighborhood," says Ms. Fussell, "but what?"
NEWS
By Karsonya Wise Whitehead | August 17, 2014
I would like to write my sons a love letter about peace and post-racial living, of a wonderful time when all people move freely, of a place where black bodies are not endangered and black life is not criminalized. But that is not my story, and it is not their reality. As much as I try, I cannot hide my frustration about what happened to Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., my disgust over what happened to Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y., my outrage over what happened to John Crawford III in Ohio, and my horror over what happened to Ezell Ford in Los Angeles, Calif.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Baltimore police are investigating two shootings that occurred Wednesday evening in southeast and West Baltimore and left two men in the hospital. Officers first responded at 5:12 p.m. to the 400 block of N. Bouldin St. in the Ellwood Park/Monument neighborhood for a report of a man shot in the back. They found an unidentified 30-year-old man suffering from multiple gunshot wounds to his back. He was transported to the hospital, where he was listed in critical condition Wednesday evening.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
After a woman picked out a photo of Tyree Threatt and said he was the man who robbed her off Reisterstown Road a month and a half ago, Baltimore detectives quickly got a warrant for his arrest, and they hauled him down to Central Booking over the past weekend, where he was held in lieu of $75,000 bail. There was just one problem: Records show that the 21-year-old Baltimore man was jailed in another case at the time of the robbery. A public defender who represented Threatt this week says he laid out jail records before a judge Monday showing that his client had what might have been the best possible alibi.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A man was killed and another three wounded in city shootings on Monday, Baltimore Police said. The first incident, in the 2900 block Brighton Street, was the non-fatal shooting of a 38-year-old man at around 12:25 a.m., police said. Homicide detectives are investigating the case because of the severity of the man's injuries, police said. Then about 20 minutes later, in the 600 block of Belair Road, 42-year-old Shante Authur was shot multiple times and died of his wounds, police said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
A chain-link fence marks the edge of Aberdeen Proving Ground, an Army installation where a nationwide base reorganization was supposed to bring so many people and jobs to Harford County that officials worried they would not have the space or resources to meet demand. Inside the fence, an estimated 21,000 people report to work, conducting research in massive new buildings. Shots fire in the distance. Sometimes bombs explode. But outside the fence, gleaming new offices completed in anticipation of economic spillover stand empty, a reminder that any growth that's taken place growth remains tightly contained.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
A pedestrian was struck and killed by a Norfolk Southern freight train late Saturday in Aberdeen. A man was on the Amtrak tracks in the 300 block of South Phildelphia Boulevard just before midnight Saturday when he was hit by a freight train heading south, according to Lt. Fred Budnick of Aberdeen Police Department. Freight trains frequently use the Amtrak tracks, he said. The incident happened behind Advance Auto Parts. The man was pronounced dead at the scene, Budnick said Sunday.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker and Michael Olesker,SUN COLUMNIST | March 7, 2005
His was the Voice of Summer. Across five decades of Baltimore Orioles baseball, those familiar tones arrived in bedrooms and barrooms, in kitchens and in cars strung out along dark lonesome roads. The athletes came and went with the years, as athletes do, but Chuck Thompson held things together. He brought us the ballgames of summer, and these helped turn us into a community. He was there every autumn, too, in a now-vanished ballpark on 33rd Street where he led the Sunday worship services for a religion called the Baltimore Colts.
NEWS
By Doug Miller | July 1, 2014
"Once a librarian, always a librarian," Pattee Fletcher says. Strictly speaking, she was never actually a librarian. But with postgraduate degrees in library and information sciences, she knows a little something about the profession. About nine months ago, the retired college professor and master gardener added a piece to her backyard landscaping through which she shares her passion for books with her neighbors in Long Reach. At first glance, those passing by on the Columbia Association pathway that runs behind Fletcher's house in the Phelps Luck neighborhood might see it as either a very large bird house or an oddly placed doll house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
It took decades before serious documentaries about the civil rights struggle of the 1960s began to appear. But less than a year after some of the biggest victories in the fight for same-sex marriage, a social movement often compared to civil rights, compelling nonfiction films chronicling that history are already starting to arrive. I'm not certain whether such near-instant history will prove to be a good or bad thing, but it's sure to shape the way the fight for marriage equality and gay rights is perceived in future battlegrounds and by future generations.
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