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Hansel And Gretel

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
For most people, the attractions of Christmas do not include the possibility of children roasting over an open fire. But that has not kept Engelbert Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel" from becoming a favorite opera at Christmastide. Based on a vivid tale by the Brothers Grimm and first performed Dec. 23, 1893, Humperdinck's most famous opera does, of course, feature lots of talk and images of sweets, notably gingerbread. So it's easy to make a seasonal tie-in, which is what Washington National Opera did over the weekend with a revival of its 2007 family-friendly production.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 25, 2013
Hansel and Gretel Witch Hunters is the latest twisted adptation of a classic tale or character, akin to tales Pride and Prejudice and Zombies or Abraham Lincolm Vampire Hunter . As might be expected from such a bizarre mashup of Grimm's fairy tale and modern culture, the movie seems to have split critics and viewers, according to early reactions. Here are excerpts some reviews: -- Tribune: Writer-director Tommy Wirkola focuses on the fights, and flings all manner of viscera at the 3-D camera as limbs are whacked off and heads and torsos explode.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 3, 1995
Ocean City is coming to Carroll County tomorrow in the form of an annual stage musical that the entire family can enjoy.William and Sue Wills will bring their Parker Playhouse to Westminster High School at 2 p.m. for a single, free performance of the Grimm fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel."Rewritten as a stage play with five songs by Mr. and Mrs. Wills, "Hansel and Gretel" follows the classic story until the end, which comes as a happy surprise, said Mr. Wills."It's just a different viewpoint," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
For most people, the attractions of Christmas do not include the possibility of children roasting over an open fire. But that has not kept Engelbert Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel" from becoming a favorite opera at Christmastide. Based on a vivid tale by the Brothers Grimm and first performed Dec. 23, 1893, Humperdinck's most famous opera does, of course, feature lots of talk and images of sweets, notably gingerbread. So it's easy to make a seasonal tie-in, which is what Washington National Opera did over the weekend with a revival of its 2007 family-friendly production.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2000
SAVAGE RESIDENT Liberty Spicher, 11, will be singing her heart out tonight in a performance of Engelbert Humperdinck's opera "Hansel and Gretel" at Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. The sixth-grader from Patuxent Valley Middle School also is a student at Peabody Institute, the renowned music school. It's common for professional groups such as the Baltimore Opera Company to cull singers from the school's choirs to play minor roles. Liberty is in five scenes, first as a gingerbread child and, in a later dream sequence, as an angel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | December 3, 2000
Ah, there's nothing like the prospect of oven-roasted youngsters to get the holiday season rolling. Not to mention a short-tempered mother, a tipsy father, a wicked witch, the Sandman, the Dew Man, 14 guardian angels, a gingerbread house and some of the most enchanting music ever written. Other than that confection-bricked abode, there may be little to connect Christmastime with Engelbert Humperdinck's operatic take on the Brothers Grimm fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel." But ever since its premiere on Dec. 23, 1893, the opera has been associated with the yuletide.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2000
The Brothers Grimm were aptly named. Their fairy tales inevitably have a dark edge somewhere, an unpleasant touch of evil, dread, harm. Stephen Sondheim seized on that underside in his musical "Into the Woods," stripping away the cute veneer of fairy tales and reminding us how impressionable, as well as precious, children are. Engelbert Humperdinck, composing in 1893, didn't have the benefit of 20th-century cynicism or skepticism and didn't necessarily appreciate...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 1998
In the Moonlight Troupers' version of "Hansel and Gretel," in production at Anne Arundel Community College, the brothers Grimm are not very grim at all.The wicked stepmother has been replaced by a loving mother who is merely under the witch's hypnotic spell. The opening scene has the requisite dark woods with spooky mist and flashes of lightning, but it is made less menacing by a pair of human-sized characters -- a gnome and a bird.And the actors have added their own child-centered twists to this William Glennon adaptation of the story of two children tricked into a wicked witch's house after they become lost in the woods.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers will present the classic fairy tale "Hansel and Gretel," with a few twists, this weekend and next.The company, which produces a children's play every other spring to coincide with an AACC course in children's theater, is using William Glennon's adaptation of the Brothers Grimm story of a witch and the two children who outsmart her.This version has no wicked stepmother. The children's real mother is put under a spell by the witch. A bird and a gnome -- puppets of nearly human size -- are unwilling henchmen of the witch, leading the children to the gingerbread house.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | April 3, 1994
Frederick Busch wrote "Ralph the Duck" for his son. At first, it was a bedtime story. Then it became a story about a man's attempts to keep a suicidal college girl alive. In a sense it's a love story, created from the complex feeling parents have when they see their grown children and remember holding what was once so little. This story, Mr. Busch said, balances loss and gain; doing so, it talks both tough and soft."Ralph the Duck," included in "The Best American Short Stories of 1989," is one of 23 stories in "The Children in the Woods," Mr. Busch's latest book.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | October 20, 2012
Maggi Uhland was happy on Tuesday that she decided to pursue German at South Carroll High School. "It is a lot easier than Spanish and a lot more fun," the 14-year-old freshman said, of the language. "And we can choose to come here. " Uhland was one of more than 1,000 students from around the county, state, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., to participate in German-American Day at McDaniel College in Westminster on Oct. 16. Now in its 18th year, the day focuses on German culture and history through workshops and lectures that discuss everything from German fairy tales and music to chilling survivors' tales of the Holocaust and anti-Hitler resistance movements during World War II. Among those was Rubin Sztajer, of Baltimore, a Polish Jew who told students of his experiences as a Holocaust survivor who endured the Warsaw Ghetto and Nazi concentration camps.
NEWS
December 13, 2009
The National Marionette Theatre presents the Brothers Grimm's classic fairy tale at 3 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. today at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway. Tickets are $10. Call 410-997-2324 or go to candlelightconcerts.org.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Phone rings. I pick up the receiver, say "Hello." "Hello," says Stephen Dixon. He sounds ... The phone rings after I punch in 10 digits. Brpuppupp. Bruuuuup. Brp. "Hello," someone says. "This is Stephen Dixon. No, it's fine. I can talk now. Just give me a minute, while I hand my wife a shirt." Phone doesn't ring. Why not? I'm sitting at my desk, waiting for Stephen Dixon to call. I drum my fingers. I want to chat about his 25th book. It's called Phone Rings. It's fair to say that Dixon, a critically acclaimed Baltimore author, has a writing style that is easily parodied.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 18, 2002
Claudia Stevens is a performance artist adept at using the unlikely to unearth unexpected truths. The unlikely components of In the Puppeteer's Wake - her moving one-woman show at the Theatre Project - are fairy tales and the Holocaust. The truths she unearths concern survival, identity and self-discovery. The Richmond-based performer revealed a talent for unusual juxtapositions in her previous Theatre Project piece, Playing Paradis, in 1994, which interwove the biography of a blind 18th-century Viennese musician with Stevens' own discovery of her parents' hidden past as Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2000
SAVAGE RESIDENT Liberty Spicher, 11, will be singing her heart out tonight in a performance of Engelbert Humperdinck's opera "Hansel and Gretel" at Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. The sixth-grader from Patuxent Valley Middle School also is a student at Peabody Institute, the renowned music school. It's common for professional groups such as the Baltimore Opera Company to cull singers from the school's choirs to play minor roles. Liberty is in five scenes, first as a gingerbread child and, in a later dream sequence, as an angel.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2000
The Brothers Grimm were aptly named. Their fairy tales inevitably have a dark edge somewhere, an unpleasant touch of evil, dread, harm. Stephen Sondheim seized on that underside in his musical "Into the Woods," stripping away the cute veneer of fairy tales and reminding us how impressionable, as well as precious, children are. Engelbert Humperdinck, composing in 1893, didn't have the benefit of 20th-century cynicism or skepticism and didn't necessarily appreciate...
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Hansel and Gretel have become the most popular residents of a retirement community nursing home in Glenarm.They coo and nuzzle on a branch inside a large coop -- lovebirds that have not only delighted their human companions but, living up to their name, recently hatched two chicks.The birds at Glen Meadows Retirement Community health care center and others perched in nursing homes around the Baltimore Beltway are the passion and business of Robin Wallace, a Pennsylvania housewife who rents her pets and provides weekly servicing of their custom-made oak and acrylic cages.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | October 20, 2012
Maggi Uhland was happy on Tuesday that she decided to pursue German at South Carroll High School. "It is a lot easier than Spanish and a lot more fun," the 14-year-old freshman said, of the language. "And we can choose to come here. " Uhland was one of more than 1,000 students from around the county, state, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., to participate in German-American Day at McDaniel College in Westminster on Oct. 16. Now in its 18th year, the day focuses on German culture and history through workshops and lectures that discuss everything from German fairy tales and music to chilling survivors' tales of the Holocaust and anti-Hitler resistance movements during World War II. Among those was Rubin Sztajer, of Baltimore, a Polish Jew who told students of his experiences as a Holocaust survivor who endured the Warsaw Ghetto and Nazi concentration camps.
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