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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 16, 1996
"Why," said Goldfinger, with a cosmopolitan smirk way back in 1964, "I don't expect you to talk at all, Mr. Bond. I expect you to die." As he spoke, a laser beam began to melt its way up toward the elegantly attired but otherwise helpless 007.Of course, James Bond figured out a way to escape, but, alas, all these many years later, it is Goldfinger -- or at least what he represented -- who faces extinction.As an icon, the super criminal, the master of dark arts and deep conspiracy, can probably be traced back to Conan Doyle's archfiend Moriarty and, further, to King Arthur's bastard son Mordred.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 16, 1996
"Why," said Goldfinger, with a cosmopolitan smirk way back in 1964, "I don't expect you to talk at all, Mr. Bond. I expect you to die." As he spoke, a laser beam began to melt its way up toward the elegantly attired but otherwise helpless 007.Of course, James Bond figured out a way to escape, but, alas, all these many years later, it is Goldfinger -- or at least what he represented -- who faces extinction.As an icon, the super criminal, the master of dark arts and deep conspiracy, can probably be traced back to Conan Doyle's archfiend Moriarty and, further, to King Arthur's bastard son Mordred.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 5, 2007
Perfume offers eau de crud. Director Tom Tykwer, who created an international sensation with the contemporary thriller Run Lola Run, has turned this portrait of an 18th-century French serial killer into a Hannibal Lecter movie for aesthetes and highbrows. Tykwer proved himself a kinetic entertainer to his bones in Lola, whose heroine never stopped moving. But in Perfume he's saddled with an anti-hero whose nose never stops twitching. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (Paramount) Starring Ben Whishaw, Dustin Hoffman, Alan Rickman.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 20, 2007
A few truths to be gleaned from Fracture, the new cat-and-mouse thriller starring Anthony Hopkins as a really smart guy who kills his wife and Ryan Gosling as the assistant D.A. charged with bringing him to justice: 1. Hopkins could spend the rest of his career channeling Hannibal Lecter, playing riffs on the criminal who's so much smarter than everyone else, though we hope he won't coast like that. Still, he is so good at the type. Fracture (New Line Cinema) Starring Anthony Hopkins, Ryan Gosling.
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By Carl Schoettler | February 20, 2001
As "Hannibal" ruled the box office for a second consecutive weekend, one thing remains clear: The most horrible part of Hannibal Lecter's return is not his taste for cannibalism but the epidemic of indigestible puns and word games he continues to evoke from the nation's movie critics and headline writers. They certainly have enjoyed a feeding frenzy: "Tasteless `Hannibal' Lacks Old Bite," declared USA Today, with the punny aplomb of the Riddler taunting Batman. "Hopkins Back for Second helping," chortled the Washington Times.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | June 8, 2007
Maybe it's time for filmmakers to try telling one story at a time. Already this spring, Spider-Man 3 and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End have committed the sin of cinematic overkill by trying to cram too many stories into a single film. And now Mr. Brooks, with Kevin Costner as a model citizen by day, serial killer by night, joins the list of the jam-packed. In addition to the story line centering on Mr. Brooks, there's one involving Demi Moore as an heiress-turned-detective with some serious parental issues to work out and another with Dane Cook as a serial killer wannabe.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1999
Dr. Hannibal Lecter, the flesh-eating villain of Thomas Harris' 1988 novel, "The Silence of the Lambs," will continue his adventures in a sequel, "Hannibal," delivered unexpectedly last week by Harris to his publisher, Delacorte Press.The novel is being rushed into print with unusual speed, said Harris' editor, Carole Baron, who is president and publisher of Dell Publishing. (Delacorte Press is Dell's hardcover imprint.) Baron said the book, which took Harris 10 years to write, would go on sale on June 8.She said the manuscript was about 600 pages long and would be about 480 pages in print.
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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
Quantico, Va.--It's no wonder actor Scott Glenn, who portrays the FBI's expert on serial killers in the movie "The Silence of the Lambs," still has nightmares.He and co-star Jodie Foster spent a week at the FBI Academy with John Douglas -- the real-life expert on serial killers and the head of the FBI's National Center for Analysis of Violent Crime -- and got a taste of what Mr. Douglas does for a living.For starters, Mr. Douglas, 45, and far more engaging and jollthan the movie character based on him, played audio and video tapes for Mr. Glenn of killers torturing their victims.
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By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 15, 1992
THE HOT HOUSE: LIFE INSIDE LEAVENWORTH PRISON.Pete Earley.Bantam.381 pages, $22.50. The federal prison at Leavenworth, Kan., was designed to resemble the Capitol in Washington.The architects weren't making a joke. At the turn of the century, when Leavenworth was built, many correctional experts believed that a well-designed, well-run prison could convert hardened criminals into model citizens.What would those innocents have made of Leavenworth today? Eight decades after it opened, it houses 1,400 of the nation's most brutal and least repentant criminals -- mobsters, bank robbers, rapists and cop killers.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Film Critic | February 11, 2001
NEW YORK -- He's won an Oscar. He's been nominated four times. He's played everyone from presidents and Nobel laureates to butlers and crazed ventriloquists. He's even been knighted. It would be hard to think of an actor more accomplished than Anthony Hopkins, who returned to movie screens last week in his role as that most erudite of cannibals, Hannibal Lecter. Yet it would also be hard to find someone less inclined to pontificate on the fine art of acting. "I've become so detached over the years," the 63-year-old actor says during a roundtable discussion at New York's Regency hotel.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 9, 2001
Want a truly horrifying experience? Forget "Hannibal." See "Saving Silverman" instead. This comedy wannabe subjects viewers to excruciatingly unfunny dialogue, abrasively unappealing characters and mentally abusive situations. "Saving Silverman" clearly strives to offend everyone. There's nothing wrong with that - the most riotous comedies often feature daring departures from good taste. But "Saving Silverman's" bad taste is laced with bad humor. It adds up to nothing but negatives. Sweet Darren Silverman (Jason Biggs)
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