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By LAURA DEMANSKI and LAURA DEMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 1999
"Hannibal," by Thomas Harris. Delacorte. 486 pages. $27.95.''Hannibal" was still tightly under wraps when readers began to applaud it on Amazon.com last month. Thomas Harris' ardent fans didn't need to read a word to know that his "Silence of the Lambs" sequel was going to be brilliant.Great expectations, alas, can breed major disappointment. The reviews appearing since the book's release have fallen pretty evenly into rants ("I feel like I've been mugged") and raves ("a unique work of art")
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SPORTS
October 22, 2007
Moves Basketball NUGGETS -- Suspended G J.R. Smith for first three games of regular season for conduct detrimental to team. WARRIORS -- Waived F Pat Burke and G Tierre Brown. WIZARDS -- Waived C Tony Massenburg and G Donell Taylor. Football 49ERS -- Waived LB Hannibal Navies. Signed FB Zak Keasey from practice squad. LIONS -- Released RB Aveion Cason and S Eric Frampton. Signed TE Eric Sylvan and DB Ramzee Robinson from practice squad. Hockey CAPITALS -- Assigned RW Joe Motzko to AHL-Hershey.
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NEWS
By Russell Baker | June 28, 1991
New YorkBEFORE LONG I'll probably manage to say something outrageous about "multicultural education," but the best I can produce right now is a small laugh. Here's why:Just a few minutes ago a dear relative, the product of a pretty good -- should we call it "monocultural" or "unicultural"? -- education, consulted me about the crossword puzzle. Who was Scipio and what washis relationship to Hannibal, and what zTC people were "Khartoum residents"? she needed to know, poor dear. Did I ever tell her!
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
In one of the few playful moments in Hannibal Rising, the evil genius with an advanced taste for humans dons a samurai mask (don't ask) that resembles the face guard Doctor Lecter wore to keep his fangs off innocent flesh in Silence of the Lambs. The image makes no sense, but it's kind of funny. Most of the movie makes too much sense and is no fun at all. Hannibal Rising (an inadvertently uproarious title) suggests this serial-killer franchise is on its last legs. "Secret origin" stories used to appear in old-time comics and pulp series right after a character clicked with the public and fans were yearning to know more.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
A franchise defender.A crucial part of the Liberty girls lacrosse dynasty.That's senior Natalie Hannibal, who will play her final regular-season game for the Lions Monday at Howard.Hannibal is one of those rare athletes who can drive herself to a top level of performance in every game no matter the opponentSure, she might get a little extra psyched for neighborhood rival South Carroll.But she also plays a fiercely intense game against a Westminster or a North Carroll in what are usually runaway victories for the fifth-ranked Lions (13-0)
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2002
The tabloid reporter eases his bronze Lincoln Versailles up Calvert Street, turns left on Franklin. His arm dangling out the window, cigarette in hand, press pass perched on the dashboard, he motions to the parking lot attendant and swings a little recklessly into the garage of the National Tattler. So unfolds a scene from Red Dragon, a movie being filmed in and around Baltimore yesterday and for the next few weeks. The "prequel" to Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, it features one of the most celebrated casts to appear in a film shot in the area, which has a movie-rich past.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
Poured into a straitjacket, a device of his own making, David Page is a disturbing sight. All those leather straps and buckles - and the artist's benign expression while confined in them - lend an R-rated feel to the scene unfolding in his Baltimore rowhouse. You're not exactly sure why. Page's description of the piece, named "From the closet of fear and desire," does nothing to assuage its unsettling effect: "A formidable but elegant jacket," he writes on his Web site (www.davidpageartist.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 9, 2001
In "The Silence of the Lambs," we met Hannibal Lecter and Clarice Starling, got to look inside their heads a little bit. What we found was a rookie FBI agent with emotional reserves she never knew she could tap into and a cannibalistic killer with a soft spot for vulnerability. Ten years later, with those characters fully imprinted in moviegoers' collective consciousness, it's time to have some fun with them. That's where "Hannibal" comes in. There's not much new ground trod on, nobody does anything that really surprises us, and the mood may be way too dark and grotesque for some tastes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 9, 2001
The stars of "Hannibal" know full well the movie's in for a lot of flak. It's a film that will anger some people, disappoint others and invite comparisons to its illustrious ancestor, the Oscar-winning "The Silence of the Lambs." They know that some people are going to say it's too violent, that others are going to complain about the changes (both Jodie Foster and director Jonathan Demme, who appeared in "Silence," declined invitations to work on "Hannibal"), and others will decry a film with a cannibalistic murderer as its protagonist.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | February 20, 2001
As "Hannibal" ruled the box office for a second consecutive weekend, one thing remains clear: The most horrible part of Hannibal Lecter's return is not his taste for cannibalism but the epidemic of indigestible puns and word games he continues to evoke from the nation's movie critics and headline writers. They certainly have enjoyed a feeding frenzy: "Tasteless `Hannibal' Lacks Old Bite," declared USA Today, with the punny aplomb of the Riddler taunting Batman. "Hopkins Back for Second helping," chortled the Washington Times.
NEWS
By Dale Bailey and Dale Bailey,Los Angeles Times | December 10, 2006
Hannibal Rising Thomas Harris Delacorte Press / 496 pages / $31.95 In The Philosophy of Horror, Noel Carroll argues that monsters violate our core conceptual frameworks. By merging otherwise exclusive states of being - zombies, for example, are both alive and dead - they undermine our faith in a safe and orderly universe. Their threat is as much existential as physical. Which brings us to Dr. Hannibal Lecter, a.k.a. Hannibal the Cannibal, the serial killer who parlayed his cameo in Thomas Harris' fine 1981 thriller, Red Dragon, into a franchise that reaches its fourth installment in Harris' new novel, Hannibal Rising.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 6, 2005
I've often wondered how Jonathan Demme, the warmest, most intuitive of filmmakers, managed, in his biggest hit, to create a benchmark monster - Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs (1991). It may be that Hannibal reflects everything Demme mistrusts about power without conscience and intellect without feeling. Writers once commonly referred to villains as "bad actors." Hannibal is more like a bad director. Often described as the devil, he's more specifically the anti-God. He controls life or death like a natural catastrophe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | December 7, 2003
If all goes according to plan, a new museum will open next summer dedicated to Maryland's African-American heritage. On Thursday night at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the effort to see that museum reach fruition will get a substantial boost from a gala event that will commemorate the tragedy and triumph that is part of every African-American's heritage. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Morgan State University Choir and a starry lineup of guest artists, including Bill Cosby, James Earl Jones and Nnenna Freelon, will be joined by local and national politicos, African ambassadors, corporate sponsors and lots of other folks interested in launching the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | August 17, 2003
Why didn't someone in Hollywood think of this sooner? New Line's Freddy vs. Jason opened in theaters Friday, and the genius at work here is so evident, the amazing thing is no one ever considered it before. Take characters from two successful movies, put them together in one guaranteed awe-inspiring film, then sit back and watch the box-office grosses grow and grow. Freddy, that dream-monger from all those Nightmare on Elm Street movies, and creepmeister Jason from Friday the 13th parts 1 through 1,000, together again for the first time.
NEWS
April 22, 2003
On April 21, 2003, MARY A., devoted wife of the late Anibal A. Brisueno. She is also survived by four daughters: Wanda Butler, of Newark, DE, Maria Brisueno Burnett, Joanne Brisueno Carr and Phyllis Brisueno, all of Baltimore, MD, four sons: Anthony of Stafford, VA, Ralph, Ramsey and Hannibal Brisueno of Baltimore, 15 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren, a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Friends may call at he family owned March Fuenral Home West, Inc., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Wednesday after 8:30 A.M., where family will receive friends on Thursday at 11:30 A.M., followed by Funeral Services at 12 noon.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 9, 2003
THE KNOCK on the door came about 15 minutes before 10 on Tuesday night. I answered, and there stood Hannibal Brisueno. Hannibal Brisueno was just one of the neighborhood teens when I moved to the 4900 block of Edgemere Ave. in 1986. He was grown now, with kids of his own, and had long since departed. His appearance at my door brought sad news. "My father died about an hour ago," he said, knowing that I, and every soul on this block, would want to know. Anibal Ayala Brisueno, retired Marine Corps master sergeant, community activist, anti-drug crusader and scold, and nemesis of every scofflaw and lowlife in our Pimlico neighborhood, died Tuesday.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
Oddball names are an Appalachian Trail tradition.Hikers on the 2,160-mile path forsake their urban titles and become Ladder with his faithful dog, Hook; Hairbear, Ramble-On, Hungry Mother, Mr. Clean, Lazy Daisy and The Fugitive.David S. Hannibal, 25, of Baltimore County, who hiked with them all, was Shaman the Medicine Man -- because of the pills he had to take daily as he walked the full length of the trail.Hannibal is an epileptic, an asthmatic and allergic to trail dust, but none of those problems proved big enough to keep him from finishing the trek.
NEWS
By Dale Bailey and Dale Bailey,Los Angeles Times | December 10, 2006
Hannibal Rising Thomas Harris Delacorte Press / 496 pages / $31.95 In The Philosophy of Horror, Noel Carroll argues that monsters violate our core conceptual frameworks. By merging otherwise exclusive states of being - zombies, for example, are both alive and dead - they undermine our faith in a safe and orderly universe. Their threat is as much existential as physical. Which brings us to Dr. Hannibal Lecter, a.k.a. Hannibal the Cannibal, the serial killer who parlayed his cameo in Thomas Harris' fine 1981 thriller, Red Dragon, into a franchise that reaches its fourth installment in Harris' new novel, Hannibal Rising.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 27, 2002
This ain't really your life ... really ain't nothin' but a movie. -- Gil Scott-Heron WASHINGTON -- Is it really over? No more choosing a gas station by its distance from the nearest on-ramp? No more selecting the parking space closest to the supermarket door? No more watching the treeline in fear? Hard to believe, but it seems probable. Officials think they've caught the two people who have been terrorizing Washington, Virginia and Maryland for three weeks in a series of random sniper attacks.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 4, 2002
Red Dragon is to terror films what Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone is to fantasy flicks. The script cleverly compresses the source book (along with a piece of The Silence of the Lambs), and the cast members look and in some cases act their parts to a T. Die-hard fans of Thomas A. Harris' original novel - the one that introduced genius serial-killer Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) and his FBI nemesis Will Graham (Edward Norton) - will enjoy the skillful illustration of its major plots and themes.
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